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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The odometer on my 2020 R1250R in Pollux Metallic Matte turned over 1000 miles a week or so ago, so I thought I'd give a 1000-mile lowdown on my experience with this bike, for those who may also be interested in picking up the new 1250. This is my first BMW, my first boxer engine, and my first naked bike, so hopefully this new-owner feedback may be especially helpful to those coming from a different type of bike (cruiser, sport tourer, et al). This will just be a brain dump rather than a carefully fashioned narrative, but with that said...

1). HANDLING is phenomenal, especially compared to my top-heavy FJR1300 (last bike) and the just-plain-heavy cruisers I'd owned previously. The relatively light weight, the low center of gravity (CG) offered by the boxer engine, and BMW's special R sauce makes for a remarkably nimble corner-carver and a bike that almost seems to follow thought and intent rather than active rider input...this is not a bike that one needs to muscle through the twisties. Riding with a pillion (my 125-lb. daughter) is similarly impressive (and surprisingly roomy), and this 525-pound bike seems far more balanced with two-up than my 650-pound FJR1300 did, and I suspect a good deal of that can be attributed to that low CG.

2). The TFT DISPLAY is a wonder, but does require both patience and practice to understand its options and how to manage them. But as with anything, it eventually becomes familiar and one begins to appreciate the considerable thought and planning that went into it by BMW's engineering/tech teams. The information is displayed in both an informative and visually pleasant manner, and it is as vivid during the brightest daytime glare as it is at night. Most reviews call this TFT the nicest on the market, and I certainly wouldn't disagree.

3). The SEAT is the most comfortable stock seat I've ever had on a motorcycle, and I'm pleased and relieved I won't need to seek aftermarket replacement. That said, it is for me still only a 90-minute seat, so brief breaks every couple of hours are part-and-parcel of an afternoon ride on this bike. The ergonomics fit me perfectly (and has since my first testride when I was immediately struck by a fit that felt almost custom) with just a slight forward lean; at this point, I don't at all anticipate the addition of risers.

4). I love that 136 hp BOXER ENGINE throb -- a distant cousin to the Harley shake -- and even the side shimmy from revving the throttle at a stop puts a smile on my face. I do not sense any issue or concern with vibrations, though they do appear somewhat at around the 5K mark, based on rear mirrors that begin to blur a bit (an issue I picked up on on the three 1250R models I testrode, but not on either of the 1250RS models I also tested...a clear difference between mirrors mounted on the handlebars and those not).

5). The SHIFT-CAM is a marvel and revelation; I've never experienced a bike with this kind of fantastic power-to-weight ratio. It's great to be back on a twin (after my last inline-4 bike) as the torque is a joy...but this shift-cam tech takes twin torque to a new level for me. Torque is delivered strong down low on the power curve like all twins, but also in the mid-range under load up to around 6500 (w/ a redline at 9K). It may not have the plastic flash of monster sportbikes with fairings, but with its 105 ft. lbs. of instant torque on demand throughout much of the rev range, this gentleman’s roadster is truly a beast in a tuxedo.

6). The LOWER RIGHTSIDE PANEL under the gas tank popped out at one point so it was flush with the tank rather than slightly inset as it should be...a firm pressing on the panel set it back in place and it hasn't moved again. The tech at the dealership at my 600-mile service said there is no fastener beneath, so not sure what happened, but am keeping an eye on it. I've had no other cosmetic or parts issue in this first 1000 miles.

7). This thing puts out one heckuva generous amount of HEAT on the right side. I've since read several threads going back years and years of R and GS folks complaining about the same issue, but no consensus seems to be reached...some say radiator, some say catalytic conv., some say exhaust. Whatever the cause, its result is not particularly pleasant on warmer days. Again, it's something I'll keep an eye on, and will probably mention it at my next service and while my 3-year warranty remains in effect. I suspect, based on what I've read, that it's just inherent in the big boxer design and all that comes with it, so am not particularly concerned. But I wish it wasn't there; it's probably the only true disappointment I have with the bike, as it would seem it shouldn't be there to that degree (no pun intended).

8). The BLUETOOTH PHONE PAIRING took more tries and was more frustrating than it should have been, but once done it seems to be holding the connection long-term. The speed limit indicator (indicates speed limit of the current road) is often wildly off, but I have to think that is the fault of whatever app I'm using on my phone to provide the info, not the TFT that's just displaying it. I've only used the (non-Nav.) turn-by-turn option once, and it worked as well as I'd hoped, and I look forward to longer rides where I know it's going to prove to be incredibly useful.

9). Because of the indicator wheel, the TURN SIGNAL SWITCH is too far from the grip and I'm constantly having to glance down to find it for use. Few folks' thumb could be that long. I hope at some point it will become natural enough to reach and stretch my thumb to activate it, but at this 1000-mile stage it still feels awkward and wrong.

10). The THROTTLE and RIDE MODES work well together, and I don't experience any snatchiness in Dynamic or lull in Road. There is a marked difference in the way each (and I'm ignoring Rain and Dynamic Pro as I haven't spent any notable time with either) delivers its ride-by-wire power, but in both modes throttle response is wonderfully smooth and predictable.

11). The DYNAMIC SUSPENSION is as good as I could ask for. I'm more of a set-it-and-forget-it kind of rider, so manually adjustable suspensions have, for me, always been a one-size-fits-all kind of exercise that only provided marginal reward. It's a joy, then, to have an optimized suspension (that I seem to recall is checking the road every, what, 100 times a minute?) that is by default dialed in far better than I could ever do myself and changes automatically according to road conditions, riding mode, pillion or not, and the way/speed/angles/etc. I'm riding. Now that is truly set it and forget it!

12). I have the small SPORT SHIELD, the flyscreen-sized OEM option, on my bike. I have found that it works well to take the pressure off one's chest, and, arguably more importantly, protects the TFT unit from hard debris. However, at speeds of 60 mph or greater, the top of that airstream of protection directly hits the underside of my helmet and creates a good deal of air noise. By sitting up unnaturally straighter, I can raise up my helmet two or three inches and the air becomes significantly cleaner and quieter. If I were to take a cross-state or interstate trip, I would likely remove the shield, as hours upon hours of that turbulence and noise would not be pleasant. For comparison, I am 6'1" with 34" inseam, so a generally standard-sized torso. Reports posted here r.e. bigger shields seem to suggest there are unfortunately few good options.

13). The HEADLIGHT works well at night, even with a setup that is not fully LED. It could certainly be better, but it's more than serviceable. I do wish the buttons and controls were backlit for night use, and like the absence of a full LED headlight, I'm both surprised and disappointed that they're not in a premium bike approaching $20K. But I don't ride much at night, so it's not something I'm too worked up about or plan to upgrade/add light(s).

14). I had one incident where the HILL HOLD function set on automatic created a concern -- stuck in a line of cars on a slight incline (that would not have activated if HH was set for manual) and the car in front of me started to reverse -- so even though such a scenario is, in the scheme of things, relatively unlikely to occur (again), I would still recommend keeping that function on manual. It takes input (and more incline) to activate, but it's not a good feeling to be stuck with the back end of car coming slowly at you. With little room to pull forward to deactivate the HH, I had to quickly kill the bike in order to deactivate and ease it back.

15). The QUICK SHIFTER works as advertised for both up and down shifting, provided one gives it adequate throttle for Up and briefly closes it for Down. While my use of it has been light as forty years of riding and muscle-memory operation leads me to prefer clutch work, I found that, generally speaking, gears three through six respond more favorably, more smoothly, to the QS than first and second.

I believe that's everything that comes to mind. In sum and a few nigglings aside, I absolutely love this bike, and could not be more pleased with my purchase. If there's anything I missed that any prospective 1250 buyer (or perhaps a 1200 owner looking to change to the 1250) is curious about, don't hesitate to ask.
 

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Very nice write-up, RC: should convince anyone contemplating buying an R.
 
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Excellent review, @RC65 .

I've read others' complaints about heat from the engine but I can't say I've noticed it on my 1200-LC, and I've ridden in some pretty high temperatures (including trips where it's over the century in old money).

Note that BMW pads their seats fairly firmly, and from my experience, they take at least 10,000 km to break in. Accordingly, some owners never experience a BMW seat as it's designed, either not clocking up the distance, or trading up to a different model too frequently.

Dynamic Pro is simply the ability to mix and match engine mode (throttle response) and ESA/DTC settings and store them as User setting. I normally ride with Road engine mode and Dynamic ESA/DTC, allowing more rear wheel slip than would be the case with the preset Road combo but retaining the throttle sensitivity of the Road mode. I find the straight Dynamic mode a bit too sensitive just off zero throttle – a bump in a corner could result in the bike lurching. When I test rode the 1250 I found BMW had softened the initial throttle response in each mode, perhaps due to the engine's additional torque, but to me it didn't feel as punchy as the 1200 in normal riding. Open the throttle a bit more though and it's a different ball game.

The self leveling suspension is one of the bike's best features for those of us who travel with varying loads, I reckon. Brill!

I must admit that hill-hold feature is one that holds no attraction to me. Probably handy on a fully laden adventure bike on a gnarly track, but I've never had a problem using either the hand or foot lever to hold the bike as I start off on the road.
 

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That's a comprehensive write up RC65.

Here some of my thoughts.

1. Handling. My previous bike, a 2004 FZS1000 (which I bought new and I still have, though its off the road at the mo) is a good bit lighter than the R1250R. My FZS1000 has a K-Tech rear shock. The R1250R is a heavy bike, but the weight is low down, so yeah it handles well for big lump. The Z8 tyres seem to have a sporty profile, and the bike is surpisingly flickable. Though on undulating roads I find the rear end a bit floaty and you can also feel the suspention working hard to keep things in check. It's fun.

2. One of the reasons I went mad and splashed out for a new un, was I was well taken by the TFT. I've also just noticed that if you press the menu button up, you can scroll through all the info without going through the menus. Me? I just wish the tip distance was displayed next to my fuel indication. You do need to be careful you don't get distracted looking through those menus whilst riding. Personally, there are too many features and settings for my liking. But yeah, riding along, I love that TFT display, and it looks so minimalistic and neat.

3. For first few rides I was thinking, **** I need to budget for a new seat - painful. But I think Panzermann has a point. I've now been out for 300 mile day rides, and it is fine.

4 and 5. I'd previously tried air cooled boxers. Plenty torque but they quickly run out of steam. Yeah its the torque, torque from nowhere, and it likes to rev. Its not quite as flexible as a four. My FZS1000 will sit at under 30mph in 6th and pull all the way to as fast as you dare. I change down to 3rd at 30mph going through town on the R1250R. The FZS1000 is a faster bike, but the R1250R is a quicker bike in many respects. It is so quick right through the rev range, it is a hoot on tight twisting roads - and yeah you can really surprise the powerranger boys if you so desire.

6. Not had that issue.

7. Not noticed.

8. Haven't bothered. I've no idea why I would want my phone paired with my bike.

9. Yup agree. The wheel gets in the way of that small fiddly switch which also happens to have no feel whatsoever. But check out the indicator thread I started - you may also be a victim of BMW stupid and dangerous self-cancelling indicators. R1250R indicators

10. I've only got road and rain. It rains in Scotland a lot. I tried rain mode once - it is just weird and confusing - so I don't bother with it.

11. Yup I specced electronic suspention. I'm not sure about it. It might be worthwhile if you vary the load you carry on a regular basis. I also wonder if it may just lead to big bills down the road. Not sure I would spec it again. I could spend that cash on a K-Tech shock - and be rest assured that non-active suspention is reliable and simple to fix if you do have issues.

12. I have a PUIG sport screen fitted. The good points - It allows higher cruising speeds. You can have much more fun out scratching on the bike. The bad points - It allows higher crusing speeds and much more fun when out scratching. I did go naked as I wanna slow down a bit. Oh, the big downside - it is very noisy - but tollerable with ear plugs.

13. Still long long days here in Scotland. So not had to rely on it. But no, in this day and age, one halogen bulb lighting the way ahead is not impressive. And if it goes pop at night time, and they do fail now and again - well it's just not funny. Very poor. Not good enougth.

14. Disabled it from day one. I have it in my car and it peeves me off all the time. Good quick thinking there RC65 with that wee moment you had!

15. The demo bike had a quick shifter. I found it crude. Plus a few decades of going up the box without using the clutch have me wondering what is the point.

16. You missed 16. Which also brings me onto vibration. The big boxer does vibrate, and I dunno why but it can go for my right hand. Just my right hand, nothing else. For a while my right paw would go numb at times, now it just gets sore on longer runs. Which is one reaon I love the cruise control. Under the right conditions I can give my paw a rest and keep moving. Plus it is really relaxing on dual carridgeways and motoroways. We have more and more pesky average speed cameras in Scotland (not actually 100% sure that they work with bikes) but again cruise control again takes care of it. Would love adaptive cruise control. My only grump about it - 450 quid option - come on BMW - make it standard - stop fleecing your customers for stuff you can make standard for buttons.

oh and17. Heated grips. Boy are they good. Could do with 4 settings rather than just the 2. They should also be standard equipment - but actually they are so good I don't mind the rip off extra 250 quid.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Excellent review, @RC65 .

Dynamic Pro is simply the ability to mix and match engine mode (throttle response) and ESA/DTC settings and store them as User setting. I normally ride with Road engine mode and Dynamic ESA/DTC, allowing more rear wheel slip than would be the case with the preset Road combo but retaining the throttle sensitivity of the Road mode. I find the straight Dynamic mode a bit too sensitive just off zero throttle – a bump in a corner could result in the bike lurching. When I test rode the 1250 I found BMW had softened the initial throttle response in each mode, perhaps due to the engine's additional torque, but to me it didn't feel as punchy as the 1200 in normal riding. Open the throttle a bit more though and it's a different ball game.
Thanks. Yes, my lackadaisical attitude toward the Dynamic Pro mode goes back to my set-it-and-forget-it attitude...the Dynamic mode -- both throttle and suspension -- feels perfect to me, so I've really no urge to start messing with it in search of nuances that would most likely elude me anyhow. I do set it in Road when my daughter is with me (which isn't often, she just happens to have been home from college during this 1000 miles) as a safety measure to ensure there is no inadvertent lurching...just keeps that throttle a touch more sane and soft when precious cargo is aboard. For solo riding (save for highway, which I do set to Road), I prefer the instantaneous punch of power and the somewhat tighter suspension of the Dynamic mode, and have had no issues with managing or predicting its impulse.

One of these days I'll spend a fun afternoon trying the different options and formulas available in Dynamic Pro, but as a default, the Dynamic mode feels like the perfect default recipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That's a comprehensive write up RC65.
Thanks, Gareth -- appreciate the feedback below, and I'll toss a few thoughts your way as well.

2. One of the reasons I went mad and splashed out for a new un, was I was well taken by the TFT. I've also just noticed that if you press the menu button up, you can scroll through all the info without going through the menus. Me? I just wish the tip distance was displayed next to my fuel indication. You do need to be careful you don't get distracted looking through those menus whilst riding. Personally, there are too many features and settings for my liking. But yeah, riding along, I love that TFT display, and it looks so minimalistic and neat.
I agree that it can be a bit overwhelming, but after a couple months it is starting to feel familiar and manageable (like that shortcut you mention)...I know now where I need to go to check or change whatever I may have in mind. R.e. the trip distance...yeah, it seems like there should be room up there (as I see a blank spot on the top left) for both mileage (or trip) and the fuel indicator, but for whatever reason it's an either-or situation, no idea why.

7. Not noticed.
Interesting that you haven't noticed the heat issue, as it sure makes itself known to me. Granted, it's primarily on very warm days -- and becomes fiery hot if the sun is shining on the right, its heat piling on the heat coming from the bike -- but still, it's considerable. It's something I intend to mention when I take it in for its next service, but I expect they'll chalk it up to That's How It Is. And that's fine, if so...just want to be sure to tackle the issue while it's under warranty.

8. Haven't bothered. I've no idea why I would want my phone paired with my bike.
I don't use the Bluetooth for calls or texts or music, but along with it being nice to record basic info (e.g. mileage) on the app and have the speed-limit indicator for roads (though, again, mine is often wildly off), the turn-by-turn navigation that's available on the TFT is really something pretty cool. I tend to ride the same area so its value thus far is questionable, but I'm thrilled it's there for the longer rides I have in mind.

9. Yup agree. The wheel gets in the way of that small fiddly switch which also happens to have no feel whatsoever. But check out the indicator thread I started - you may also be a victim of BMW stupid and dangerous self-cancelling indicators. R1250R indicators
I did read that thread earlier, and have been keeping an eye on the issue. Mine doesn't seem to share that same problem, or maybe I'm just doing it differently...but as near as I can tell, they are functioning as expected.

10. I've only got road and rain. It rains in Scotland a lot. I tried rain mode once - it is just weird and confusing - so I don't bother with it.
I have't even tried RAIN...that type of performance is not why you buy a bike like this.:cool: If one needs that kind of aid in the rain, perhaps they shouldn't be riding in it.

11. Yup I specced electronic suspention. I'm not sure about it. It might be worthwhile if you vary the load you carry on a regular basis. I also wonder if it may just lead to big bills down the road. Not sure I would spec it again. I could spend that cash on a K-Tech shock - and be rest assured that non-active suspention is reliable and simple to fix if you do have issues.
The thing about the offerings in America is that you'd be hardpressed to find any new BMW bike on a showroom floor that isn't specced with every option available, they all come fully loaded with every bell-and-whistle. So while I didn't have any other option (unless I wanted to special order and wait..and wait...and wait during a pandemic while BMW's factory was shut down), I am glad I have it. It gives me some assurance that the bike is performing at what the designers and techs feel is its optimal level (generally speaking), and the dynamic function that allows it to modify on the fly according to all sorts of parameters lets me just enjoy the ride and worry less.

16. You missed 16. Which also brings me onto vibration. The big boxer does vibrate, and I dunno why but it can go for my right hand. Just my right hand, nothing else. For a while my right paw would go numb at times, now it just gets sore on longer runs.
I mentioned it briefly when I spoke about the engine, but probably did downplay it a bit, as I also get the numb right hand periodically. Not sure if I chalk that up to clenching too hard, constricting the veins in my wrist with too much downward press from the slight forward lean, or the vibrations, but I do suspect the vibrations play at least a part in that. Guess I just kind got used to the issue with my FJR, which turned both hands numb (and with more regularity)...yes, even the inline-4 with its legendary smoothness does it, unfortunately. I may try Grip Puppies on my R1250R, see if that makes a difference, but not sure.

oh and17. Heated grips. Boy are they good. Could do with 4 settings rather than just the 2. They should also be standard equipment - but actually they are so good I don't mind the rip off extra 250 quid.
You're right, I did forget that feature...they're great. Yeah, some settings between Pretty Good and Blazing Hot would be nice, but, like you, I can't really complain, as they do the trick and do it Pretty Good.
 

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Interesting that you haven't noticed the heat issue, as it sure makes itself known to me.
Maybe difference in the weather. We had a cracking spring during lockdown, in fact often it was too warm for me, and of course I was limited for getting about on the bike.
Now it is the height of summer, 16 or 17 degrees C seems to be the order of the day - which suits me fine as long as it's not blowing a hoolie or chucking it doon - which sadly it often is. Oh, will be around 20 degrees tomorrow and 25 Friday, then back to 16ish for Saturday. Just maybe it is warmer where you are.
I did read that thread earlier, and have been keeping an eye on the issue. Mine doesn't seem to share that same problem, or maybe I'm just doing it differently...but as near as I can tell, they are functioning as expected.
You mean yours don't auto cancel? Lucky you!
I have't even tried RAIN...that type of performance is not why you buy a bike like this.:cool: If one needs that kind of aid in the rain, perhaps they shouldn't be riding in it.
I don't get the whole rider mode thing. Just gimmie the optimal map and an on/off switch. Interesting the RAIN mode still gives you full power - it's kinda like adding in turbo lag or something - I didn't like it at all.
The thing about the offerings in America is that you'd be hardpressed to find any new BMW bike on a showroom floor that isn't specced with every option available, they all come fully loaded with every bell-and-whistle.
Yup - same here. Showroom bikes are usually fully loaded. It's why I ordered mine. BMW's endless options are a bit of a turn off for me. And lets be honest, lots of these options are now standard equipment on other bikes. The dealer then tries to tell me that to get a good price on trade in down the road you need loads of options. I told him where to go with that.
Guess I just kind got used to the issue with my FJR, which turned both hands numb
Never had the issue with a four. Though I'm aware that some of them can have nasty secondary vibes.
You're right, I did forget that feature...they're great. Yeah, some settings between Pretty Good and Blazing Hot would be nice, but, like you, I can't really complain, as they do the trick and do it Pretty Good.
Yeah I end up switching between 1 and 2, or 1 and off. The switch is in an odd place too, but hey still way better than any aftermarket heated grips I've used.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Maybe difference in the weather. We had a cracking spring during lockdown, in fact often it was too warm for me, and of course I was limited for getting about on the bike.
Now it is the height of summer, 16 or 17 degrees C seems to be the order of the day - which suits me fine as long as it's not blowing a hoolie or chucking it doon - which sadly it often is. Oh, will be around 20 degrees tomorrow and 25 Friday, then back to 16ish for Saturday. Just maybe it is warmer where you are.
It's 84 degrees F as I type, which translates to 29 C, so it's quite warm, which doesn't help the heat issue and certainly makes it more pronounced. When the weather was (blessedly) in the low- to mid-70s F the last week or two, I could still feel the heat present on the right side, but it wasn't searing. In this particular kind of hot summer weather that compounds the issue, I find myself having to scoot my right leg outward a bit to get away from the significant heat.
Moderate weather of 70-something degrees F is obviously the best, most objective gauge as to its how extreme the issue is, and in that environment it's noticeable but not overly significant. I also watch the temp reading on the TFT and it's never been out of the green, even in the hottest day, so I'm not overly concerned.

You mean yours don't auto cancel? Lucky you!
Yes, they do auto-cancel, a feature which I love, but they don't do so prematurely, which I gathered was the gist of the problem you were discussing. If the blinking green arrow on the TFT accurately represents the blinker's real-time function, the length on mine seems appropriate and correct.
 

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I use dynamic pro for the dynamic engine map, road DTC, and dynamic auto suspension. I figure this gives me the max torque when I want it while keeping the bike upright. Does this make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I use dynamic pro for the dynamic engine map, road DTC, and dynamic auto suspension. I figure this gives me the max torque when I want it while keeping the bike upright. Does this make sense?
It does, and is probably a good argument for me to start looking a bit closer at the Pro mode, as that triad is what I'm ultimately after. I don't really ride aggressively enough to worry too much about slippage, but it certainly couldn't hurt to boost the DTC up a bit more than Dynamic provides.
 

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It's 84 degrees F as I type, which translates to 29 C, so it's quite warm, which doesn't help the heat issue and certainly makes it more pronounced.
Whoa, that's way too warm fae me.

She is air/water cooled, rather than purely water cooled, so I guess she'll give off a little heat, but so far I've not noticed much. I have noticed that even on cool days, in traffic, or when you are parking up, she gets hot quite quick and the fan starts cutting in and out repeatedly.

Mines also used a little oil. Dunno if that's just normal, or due to running in, or what.

Yes, they do auto-cancel, a feature which I love, but they don't do so prematurely, which I gathered was the gist of the problem you were discussing. If the blinking green arrow on the TFT accurately represents the blinker's real-time function, the length on mine seems appropriate and correct.
I hate them. Correct, would be not cancelling until I press the button. Grrrr.

Oh talking of niggles. The side stand. It's too long. I've found I have to be very choosey where I park. It's already rolled off its side stand once just as I was stepping away from it - I just managed to catch it, and got a nice bruise on my knee doing so.

And maybe this is just me. But I now always pull the clutch in when lifting or lowering the side stand. I've caught the gear lever a couple of times going for the side stand which gave me a few surprises. I'm trying hard not to drop this thing!
 

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I use dynamic pro for the dynamic engine map, road DTC, and dynamic auto suspension. I figure this gives me the max torque when I want it while keeping the bike upright. Does this make sense?
In a word no. That's double Dutch Dougl.
 

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I'd agree about the side stand -- it is a bit long. I haven't had any particular worries, but it always looks like it's standing up straighter than I'd prefer, so I'm careful to always park it on a level (or slightly left-sloping) surface and usually give it just a slight tug on the left grip once I'm off to make sure it's firmly situated. Parking on a surface that's slightly right-sloping could end in a very bad day.
 

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The side stand. It's too long.
Two ways to address this (other than being selective about where to park):
  • Get off the bike and tug the bars up a bit before turning off the ignition (for ESA models). This will effectively lock the forks in a more extended position. Not sure if the self levelling function will interfere with this, but it works on the 1200-LC.
  • Turn the 'bars fully to the left.
 

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I use dynamic pro for the dynamic engine map, road DTC, and dynamic auto suspension. I figure this gives me the max torque when I want it while keeping the bike upright. Does this make sense?
Just to be clear, for casual readers, the suspension setting of Dynamic and the Engine Mode setting of Dynamic are independent of each other, notwithstanding their common name. The engine mode has set combinations of throttle response (but common maximum power at full throttle) - Rain, Road and Dynamic settings. Each of these has DTC/ASC settings associated with them that allow nil, a little, and a little more slippage respectively before intervention. The Dynamic Pro option invokes a User setting that allows the rider to set up a combination of throttle response and DTC/ASC to their preference, choosing from the respective presets.

So what Dougl is saying, I think, is he wants the throttle response to be as sharp as possible, but doesn't want too much rear wheel slip. I happen to prefer it the other way around. If Dougl wanted earlier DTC/AC intervention, he could set User mode to Dynamic engine map with Rain.

I find Rain mode useful in greasy conditions where I want to minimise any prospect of the back wheel stepping out of line.

Below is a graph of the three engine modes' throttle response for the 1200-LC. the 1250 would have its own profile, but the relationship between the modes would be similar.


108509
 
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I’ve never had traction control or a suspension as good as this but I probably wouldn’t do anything that would require traction control.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Did a lot of riding this week, and you know, there is one thing that I really wish this 1250R had that it does not: an indicator on the TFT showing what cam profile the bike is currently running on.

I'd love to know when that Shift-Cam setup shifts from the initial profile to the second, and back again. I can gauge to some degree intuitively via the pull of the felt torque and by how much load (or lack thereof) I'm giving it, but it's really more a guess than anything else, given how seamless the shift is.

I'd love to know when it shifts from one profile to another, and I'm sure BMW's techs are up to the task to add that indicator to the TFT (call it "A" to "B", for example)...so BMW, if you're reading this, get those techs of yours to work.:geek:
 

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There's a tech article (paywalled) on Springer that might have full details, but everything I can find shows it tied to throttle position. I imagine it's also tied to engine speed as well, but I can't find anything that mentions anything other than activating according to throttle position...
 

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I was also just reading about the water cooling, and apparently there is only an electric fan on the right side...
 

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I prefer the instantaneous punch of power and the somewhat tighter suspension of the Dynamic mode, and have had no issues with managing or predicting its impulse.
Likewise I prefer the sharp throttle response of the Dynamic mode and have had no problems using it. But when it rains I like to keep the rear wheel under control. Thus I programmed the User mode (Dynamic Pro on R1250R) to have the Dynamic mode throttle response combined with the higher sensitivity and earlier intervention of the Rain mode traction control.
 
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