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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I've just joined this forum. I'm in Bangkok (Thailand) and have been hoping to buy a R1200R, which has not been sold here. They only sell the R1200GS. However, starting this fall they will sell the R1200R Classic, but not the standard model. The Classic looks great (paint, chrome etc) but I have never wanted a bike with wire wheels. As I understand, they are harder to clean, can rust, require maintenance and adjustment and - most importantly - require that you replace the tube if you get a flat on the road. It's the last point that bothers me the most.

I've never had a flat while riding, and I don't want to be stranded in the boonies of Thailand with unlikely prospects of getting assistance. What do people think about this? Would the best course of action be to get the bike and change to cast wheels?

Many thanks in advance.
 

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Classic Dilema

You are right. Change out the wheels! Ouch!
An expensive solution, but if that's your only option.......?.
You could wait, on a gamble that BMW may offer it next year.

Models and options vary from country to country.
I saw the Classic listed on BMW's Korea website, but
but the Standard was not listed there either.
Canada has a touring package available that is not offered here in Japan. :(
Chrome plated exhaust can is a $105 Canadian dollar Option,
but 2 BMW dealers quoted over 10 times that amount here in Japan.
Even the Akropovic was cheaper!!!

The way I understand it,
the Standard and Classic models have very much the same specs.
They differ in the wheels, paint scheme, mirrors, and a slight price variation.

The tubeless cast wheels are the reason I bought the Standard model.
I didn't want tube type tires. I'm like you. It's TOO much worry.
Harder to fix a flat tube on the side of the road alone.
Plugging a tubeless tire is fast and easy.
The cast wheels on the Standard Roadster are very nice. IMHO
I think a lot of them.
The new price for a set of them is upwards of $3400 USD
according to Real OEM Parts.
BMW thinks a lot of them, too!

Good touring!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for chiming in Clem. $3400 for wheels, ouch that's a lot. Large bike prices in Thailand are outrageous to begin with - the R1200R Classic will go for Bt. 980,000 which is nearly $33,000. Is that about double the price in the US?

I'm not sure I could justify adding a new pair of cast wheels on top of that!

I don't understand the attraction of spoke wheels. I've heard they take pot holes better (but may have to be adjusted or re-trued after a hard hit) but all in all, aluminum cast wheels look like a much better option.

If you get a flat 200 miles from civilization with a tubed tire, what do you do?
 

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In a very rough estimate, YES, about twice the price.
Thailand bikers there are certainly doing their fair share
to support BMW's financial statement.
I hope that you get the Classic, and enjoy it.

Flat ! What do you do?
PRAY ?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Seriously, even if you carry a spare tube (or two spare tubes, since the front and rear tires are different sizes) how do you fix a flat 200 miles from the edge of nowhere in the Thai countryside? I assume you need tools to remove the wheel and so on.... It really doesn't sound like something that falls within my circle of easy competence.

I'm also considering a Harley Davidson XL883R Roadster. I know it's miles apart from the Beemer in every possible way, but that doesn't mean I cannot like them both. It's about $20k, or 60% of the cost of the R1200R Classic (including a set of cast wheels), which is not to be sneezed at.

Love that R1200R engine, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I confirmed that Thailand is only going to get five "Classics", not the standard R1200R. Odd....and going to awfully darn expensive if I change the wheels out.
 

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You may not have any problem.
It depends upon the road conditions and speeds at which you ride.
There are rim strips to seal the spokes.
There are gel sealers added inside the tube to slow/stop air loss if punctured.
A combination approach combined with defensive driving
may allow you to enjoy months/years of pleasure with the tubed spoke rims.
I don't have flat problems with my spoke rims on the street
as much as I do the off-road bikes.
Same goes for tightening the spokes and truing the rims.
Avoiding the trash & debris on the shoulder is important, though.
Carry tire irons, a spare tube, and an inflation device.
Ride with a friend when possible.
With a bit of luck, a used set of those cast wheels will pop up on the internet.
Every bike I have ever owned demanded some kind of compromise.
That Classic sure is SWEET lookin' !!
 

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I was told when I bought my classic the wheels do not require tubes as the revised how the spokes are welded to the wheel so its sealed. They wanted retro look with modern convenience.
 

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I was told when I bought my classic the wheels do not require tubes as the revised how the spokes are welded to the wheel so its sealed. They wanted retro look with modern convenience.

It states clearly on the information sheet on the bike that they are tubeless. How many people who contributed to this actually researched or even went down to the dealer before commenting? I found on other forums BMW has been using tubeless tires on the gs line for years with spoke wheels. No wonder nobody uses this forum :eek:
 

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wheels

hi
yes they should be tubeless , my old gs 1200 adv 6 year back had tubeless tyres and in the took kit had a tubeless repair kit ,plugs , however i did used to carry those cans of liquid rubber that inflate your tyre in the event of a puncture , if you split the tyre then you are well stuck .:)
 

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The information I have is that these wheels contain tubes inside tyres that are marked as tubeless. Yes, the GS had a cross-spoked sealed rim that meant they could run properly tubeless but I understood that the same mechanism couldn't be applied to a rim of the size used on the R1200R - or maybe the front is tubeless and only the rear is tubed.

I'm trying to establish what the facts really are since this thread is rife with opinion and little fact. ;)
 

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MAX BMW Motorcycles - BMW Parts & Technical Diagrams - R1200R 10+ (K27)



36_1601 - SPOKE WHEEL, REAR
Zoom
Print


#Part Number DescriptionlbQty
Each01 77218521223 SET: WIRE WHEEL, SILVER, REAR - 5,5X17 1 NA-- 36317668389 WHEEL BOLT - M10X530.07 X $5.67
02 36318528874 SPEICHE INNEN - L=136,4MM 20 NA03 36318528875 SPEICHE AUSSEN - L=144,8MM 20 NA04 36317719730 NIPPLE - M4,50.01 40 $1.44
05 36318528711 TIRE FLAP - 17" / 60MM0.53 1 NA06 36317723401 SPACER RING0.57 1 NA07 07129904491 ISA SCREW - M5X10 5 NA08 36317668389 WHEEL BOLT - M10X530.07 5 $5.67
09 36116766326 BALANCE WEIGHT, ZINC, W. ADHESIVE FOIL - 5G0.02 X $1.38



Spokes are laced onto the inner hub and then
secured to the outer rim by threaded nipples.

Not welded, IMHO.

A tire flap or rim tape is used to protect the tube from
wearing against the nipple.
These spokes, laced to the center of the rim, are NOT
interchangeable without breaking the tire bead.


The GS spokes, on the other hand, are laced to the very outer edge of the rim, therefore they are easily replaced without deflating the tire.
SPOKE WHEEL RIM/SPOKE
Diagram #36_0413


Now, That's ingenious!
 

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Don't call. Truth hurts.
You know what they say.........is bliss.
 
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