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I overtightened the oil filter on my 2012 R1200R and seem to have either stripped out the threads from the oil filter mount/stud, stripped out the threads from the oil filter, or possibly screwed the filter past the threads as this guy did...


I ripped off the lower "can" part of the oil filter and can see the oil filter mount/stud and underside of the base of the oil filter. With a lot of force I can turn the base of the oil filter but it still will not unscrew for the oil filter mount/stud.

At this point the only thing I can think of is trying to unscrew the oil filter mount/stud however I can't find a technical drawing of what the oil filter mount/stud looks like. You can see an example of a mount/stud on this video at approximately 6:17 but its showing a 2016 R1200GS.

I found a technical drawing from an online parts catalog from a R1200GS 10-13 from beneath the engine without the oil filter. This image does not show any sort of an oil filter stud/mount coming out of the engine to attach the oil filter.


107807


Does anyone know if the oil filter mount/stud can be removed on a 2012 R1200R and what it looks like?

Also any suggestions are welcome!
 

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First question...did you get the filter off? It sound like “no.”

I’d not do anything until you completely remove the oil filter. If you’ve already ripped it open, try to cut the rest of it off. I’d need photos of what it looks like to guess what would work best. If you can get a Dremmel tool in there with a cutting wheel and score the base of the filter enough that it breaks apart, it may take the tension off the bolt threads and let it spin off. At worst, you have to cut/score into the base with the mating threads and carefully break it loose from the mounting bolt.

Once you have it off, you can inspect the mounting bolt for damage...ideally with a matching nut (or spare filter) to see if the threads are damaged (presuming damage is not obvious). I’d expect the filter side to be made of cheaper metal so that if any side fails, it’s the side that comes off. The mounting bolt might be perfectly fine.

If the mounting bolt has minor damage, you might need to ask around. My dad has jeweler files that can be used to smooth out damaged bolt threads. Sometimes you can crank on/off a more durable nut to “realign” the threads. Maybe there’s a tool for that. All of these may be a better option than having to replace the mounting bolt. If you’re really lucky, the mounting bolt is removable (unscrews in an opposing direction so it doesn’t come off with the filter). I’ll see if I can find a better image of an RS...although my diagrams are for a ‘18 model.
 

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So far, no luck getting a picture, but odds are you just need to get the filter turning. The thread you mentioned said to use something to wedge the filter away (flathead screwdriver or small crowbar) while unscrewing or as I said...carefully cut the remainder free.

Everything indicates the mounting bolt is very sturdy and should withstand stripping from over tightening. Nothing showing how it comes off. I’ll next try my repair DVD to see if there are better images.
 

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Okay, I found the following image on my repair DVD. No instructions, but it appears the mount bolt wrenches off as it has the appearance of a bolt head around the hole. I can't find any instruction on how it comes off or an image of whether it's cast into the left side casing or comes off separately.

107811
 

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First question...did you get the filter off? It sound like “no.”

I’d not do anything until you completely remove the oil filter. If you’ve already ripped it open, try to cut the rest of it off. I’d need photos of what it looks like to guess what would work best. If you can get a Dremmel tool in there with a cutting wheel and score the base of the filter enough that it breaks apart, it may take the tension off the bolt threads and let it spin off. At worst, you have to cut/score into the base with the mating threads and carefully break it loose from the mounting bolt.

Once you have it off, you can inspect the mounting bolt for damage...ideally with a matching nut (or spare filter) to see if the threads are damaged (presuming damage is not obvious). I’d expect the filter side to be made of cheaper metal so that if any side fails, it’s the side that comes off. The mounting bolt might be perfectly fine.

If the mounting bolt has minor damage, you might need to ask around. My dad has jeweler files that can be used to smooth out damaged bolt threads. Sometimes you can crank on/off a more durable nut to “realign” the threads. Maybe there’s a tool for that. All of these may be a better option than having to replace the mounting bolt. If you’re really lucky, the mounting bolt is removable (unscrews in an opposing direction so it doesn’t come off with the filter). I’ll see if I can find a better image of an RS...although my diagrams are for a ‘18 model.
The lower "can" part of the filter has been removed but the top plate is still attached...this is the part I cannot remove. Thanks!
 

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So far, no luck getting a picture, but odds are you just need to get the filter turning. The thread you mentioned said to use something to wedge the filter away (flathead screwdriver or small crowbar) while unscrewing or as I said...carefully cut the remainder free.

Everything indicates the mounting bolt is very sturdy and should withstand stripping from over tightening. Nothing showing how it comes off. I’ll next try my repair DVD to see if there are better images.
Thank you! I hope you are right!
 

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Okay, I found the following image on my repair DVD. No instructions, but it appears the mount bolt wrenches off as it has the appearance of a bolt head around the hole. I can't find any instruction on how it comes off or an image of whether it's cast into the left side casing or comes off separately.

View attachment 107811
Thank you! I hope my engine has the same type of mount bolt and it can be easily removed if necessary.
 

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Personally, I haven't ever had this issue, but have struggled mightily in the past getting oil filters off at times usually tightened by others with marginal mechanical prowess, and most often on cars.

Re the BMW mounting bolt, it is possible that the mounting bolt itself it may be a left hand thread into the crankcase (ie; righty loosey, lefty tightey) , but the external threaded spigot onto which the oil filter screws is simply a normal 'righty tighty, lefty loosey' right hand thread? That would kinda' make sense to me...? But take that with a grain of salt.
 

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... it is possible that the mounting bolt itself it may be a left hand thread into the crankcase
Nice lateral thinking Herdy, but I'd think that very unlikely. In theory, tightening the the oil filter would then loosen the mounting post, which would be undesirable, so there would be no reason to go LH thread. More likely it's a regular RH thread that's torqued up nicely to suit its diameter and the crankcase material, maybe even with some thread lock, therefore affixing the post much more strongly than a properly torqued oil filter (only 11 Nm).

If it's the same as the mounting post on the LC (likely, but not guaranteed) the filter's mounting plate will need to be removed before you can access the hex, and once you've done that, your problem is solved anyway, @aweesner so I'd not pursue that approach if it were me.

I assume you've ripped the can off to the extent you can access the whole base plate, @aweesner . Perhaps you could make up a tool similar to the one in this video, but also cut grooves in the bolts so that, once inserted, you could turn (in the 'undoing' direction) to engage them vertically, allowing downward force to be applied as you turn, thus re-engaging the threads (or if simply part-stripped thread, work the base plate down the threads of the mounting post).

107829
 

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Nice lateral thinking Herdy, but I'd think that very unlikely. In theory, tightening the the oil filter would then loosen the mounting post, which would be undesirable, so there would be no reason to go LH thread. More likely it's a regular RH thread that's torqued up nicely to suit its diameter and the crankcase material, maybe even with some thread lock, therefore affixing the post much more strongly than a properly torqued oil filter (only 11 Nm).

If it's the same as the mounting post on the LC (likely, but not guaranteed) the filter's mounting plate will need to be removed before you can access the hex, and once you've done that, your problem is solved anyway, @aweesner so I'd not pursue that approach if it were me.

I assume you've ripped the can off to the extent you can access the whole base plate, @aweesner . Perhaps you could make up a tool similar to the one in this video, but also cut grooves in the bolts so that, once inserted, you could turn (in the 'undoing' direction) to engage them vertically, allowing downward force to be applied as you turn, thus re-engaging the threads (or if simply part-stripped thread, work the base plate down the threads of the mounting post).

View attachment 107829
Nice lateral thinking Herdy, but I'd think that very unlikely. In theory, tightening the the oil filter would then loosen the mounting post, which would be undesirable, so there would be no reason to go LH thread. More likely it's a regular RH thread that's torqued up nicely to suit its diameter and the crankcase material, maybe even with some thread lock, therefore affixing the post much more strongly than a properly torqued oil filter (only 11 Nm).

If it's the same as the mounting post on the LC (likely, but not guaranteed) the filter's mounting plate will need to be removed before you can access the hex, and once you've done that, your problem is solved anyway, @aweesner so I'd not pursue that approach if it were me.

I assume you've ripped the can off to the extent you can access the whole base plate, @aweesner . Perhaps you could make up a tool similar to the one in this video, but also cut grooves in the bolts so that, once inserted, you could turn (in the 'undoing' direction) to engage them vertically, allowing downward force to be applied as you turn, thus re-engaging the threads (or if simply part-stripped thread, work the base plate down the threads of the mounting post).

View attachment 107829
Thanks for your reply. The filter has been completely removed however the threads of the spigot/mount/stud are severely damaged. I'll be posting a new thread for advice. Thank you!
 

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Possible to run a die over it?
 

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I overtightened the oil filter on my 2012 R1200R and seem to have either stripped out the threads from the oil filter mount/stud, stripped out the threads from the oil filter, or possibly screwed the filter past the threads as this guy did...


I ripped off the lower "can" part of the oil filter and can see the oil filter mount/stud and underside of the base of the oil filter. With a lot of force I can turn the base of the oil filter but it still will not unscrew for the oil filter mount/stud.

At this point the only thing I can think of is trying to unscrew the oil filter mount/stud however I can't find a technical drawing of what the oil filter mount/stud looks like. You can see an example of a mount/stud on this video at approximately 6:17 but its showing a 2016 R1200GS.

I found a technical drawing from an online parts catalog from a R1200GS 10-13 from beneath the engine without the oil filter. This image does not show any sort of an oil filter stud/mount coming out of the engine to attach the oil filter.


View attachment 107807

Does anyone know if the oil filter mount/stud can be removed on a 2012 R1200R and what it looks like?

Also any suggestions are welcome!
Here’s something you can try-the male end of the filter housing are now exposed, hold onto the end of the threads with a vice grip and remove whats left of the filter. You’ll then have to clean up the threads on the male neck by either chasing them or using a die. If you can get a bit over them prior to using the vice grip that will make chasing them easier. It’s easy to get at the filter by removing the exhaust which is a easy job on that bike-you’ll have room to get at the filter from the left unobstructed w the exhaust removed. As far as the housing for the filter I’m not sure how to remove it but I’d bet you’d have to remove the oil pan to do so. I’d also give a dremel tool a shot with the exhaust out of the way. You should be able to cut away at the remains of the filter with out doing damage. Best of luck
 

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Unfortunately a little late to the party, @joeres

As noted in the later posts, the filter has been removed, leaving the damaged filter nipple threads.
 

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The oil filter threaded nipple is not part of engine block casting, normally made of steel and it has externally like pictured a way to be removed with socket if damaged.if damaged and it has no way of putting a wrench or socket, look inside and you should see that the hole will accommodate a Allen Wrench for removal like a standard stud, sealer maybe used
 
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