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Just curious if anyone has tested ridden the latest RS with the anti judder damper and found any improvement to the jacking effect of the shaft drive esp low speed on and off throttle.
Any other differences to the previous RS would be interesting too.

I was tempted to consider the latest RS as a touring machine whilst my 2014 a/c R12R is used intra city.
 

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Never noticed any jacking effect on my R-LC. I can't imagine how a judder damper (which is simply a resilient coupling) would have any effect on it anyway. :icon_scratch:
 

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Never noticed any jacking effect on my R-LC. I can't imagine how a judder damper (which is simply a resilient coupling) would have any effect on it anyway. :icon_scratch:
While admiring your economy of words, PZ, BMW describes it differently as "Judder damper on the transmission output shaft along with revised selector drum actuators, transmission shaft, and transmission shaft bearings".


Whatever, it works brilliantly!:nerd:
 

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I tested a 2017 GS recently whilst my 2016 R was in for a service. The only noticeable difference in engine\transmission was that the '17 gearbox is a definite improvement; smoother and easier shifting and less clunky.
 

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While admiring your economy of words, PZ, BMW describes it differently as "Judder damper on the transmission output shaft along with revised selector drum actuators, transmission shaft, and transmission shaft bearings".


Whatever, it works brilliantly!:nerd:
To be nore expansive, LoS, the revised selector drum actuators would contribute to smoother shifting, and the revised shaft with judder damper may also contribute somewhat (as well as reducing shock on the transmission). The transmission shaft bearings would presumably contribute to longer life. None of these, though, would affect any perceived jacking effect.

I must admit that my '15 LC requires a particular shifting technique to avoid a clunk, so the transmission revisions are the only thing from the latest R that I wouldn't mind having. ABS Pro would be a 'nice to have', but I've never stretched the current ABS to the extent that I feel I need the Pro version. Dynamische Bremslicht Amateur is worthwhile, however. :wink2:
 
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Hmmmmm, I didn't realize my '15 R1200R(with SAP) had the "judders", it shift fairly well for a BMW. On the other hand the '15 GSA shifts as though it suffering from some serious infliction, perhaps the 'judders'.

Paul
 

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To be nore expansive, LoS, the revised selector drum actuators would contribute to smoother shifting, and the revised shaft with judder damper may also contribute somewhat (as well as reducing shock on the transmission). The transmission shaft bearings would presumably contribute to longer life. None of these, though, would affect any perceived jacking effect.

I must admit that my '15 LC requires a particular shifting technique to avoid a clunk, so the transmission revisions are the only thing from the latest R that I wouldn't mind having. ABS Pro would be a 'nice to have', but I've never stretched the current ABS to the extent that I feel I need the Pro version. Dynamische Bremslicht Amateur is worthwhile, however. :wink2:
I just wish that the next phase of development might remove totally that sensation and noise of a Mack truck ploughing into the back of the bike when - most times - engaging first gear from stand-still, as at traffic lights.:frown2:
 

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I just wish that the next phase of development might remove totally that sensation and noise of a Mack truck ploughing into the back of the bike when - most times - engaging first gear from stand-still, as at traffic lights.:frown2:
I try to avoid it by keeping the bike in gear at lights - mechanical clunks like that just don't sound right (something must be wearing).

When starting the engine, I leave it in first gear and rock the bike backwards or forwards to free the clutch before engaging the starter (still in gear) - starts first touch. From a cold start, I wheel the bike out if the garage with the clutch in and in first gear; slip into neutral for startup, then the first gear selection is silent.
 

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I try to avoid it by keeping the bike in gear at lights - mechanical clunks like that just don't sound right (something must be wearing).When starting the engine, I leave it in first gear and rock the bike backwards or forwards to free the clutch before engaging the starter (still in gear) - starts first touch. From a cold start, I wheel the bike out if the garage with the clutch in and in first gear; slip into neutral for startup, then the first gear selection is silent.
First - we don't have cold starts up here, PZ - lukewarm would be the very worst. More seriously, I had always been 'taught' that one should not allow a bike to stand idling with bike in gear and clutch in (disengaged) for any length of time over a very few seconds - as typically at traffic-lights - as it was deemed to be 'unhealthy' for the clutch. Or is that another old wives tale now out the window?
 

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The cars I used to work on had something we called a "throw out bearing" that would press against the pressure plate to disengage the clutch. I actually had one fail on a VW bus I used to abuse.

On my bike, if I'm stopped where there is any possibility of being rear ended I'll leave it in 1st with the clutch pulled so I can maybe get out of the way in time if I see it coming in the mirror.
 

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That certainly was the guidane 'back in the day', LoS, and if I owned a Ducati, I'd probably still do the same. :grin2:

These days, the technique Charlie described is taught by riding schools - always have a quick 'way out'.
 

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Having been a victim many years ago of a rear-ending while stopped at a light, not once but TWICE, I never sit stopped while in neutral. Always in 1st, clutch pulled in, foot on rear brake, scanning behind me, with a clear path of escape ahead. And on more than one occasion I've had to use that escape path to get away from some dimwit behind me.

The first rear-ender was by a woman in a very large black Suburban, who was reading a road map while stopped behind me. She apparently glanced up over the map to see the light change to green and proceeded to floor it, unable to see me in front of her waiting for a pedestrian to cross before turning. I've never worn out a motorcycle clutch, in more than 50 years of riding.

I'm not sure what it is about me, but I was also rear-ended in my 4x4 truck a coupe of years ago while stopped at a light. A young woman managed to drive her Honda Civic underneath the back end of the truck all the way to the axle. One written-off Civic and one slightly bent bumper on the truck.
 

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First - we don't have cold starts up here, PZ - lukewarm would be the very worst. More seriously, I had always been 'taught' that one should not allow a bike to stand idling with bike in gear and clutch in (disengaged) for any length of time over a very few seconds - as typically at traffic-lights - as it was deemed to be 'unhealthy' for the clutch. Or is that another old wives tale now out the window?
I love reanimated threads...
I've had many motorcycles and have only worn out one clutch. My 94 RS clutch wore out at 83k miles. I replaced it at some expense, only to have the gearbox fail about 5k miles later.

As for damage to the disks or mechanism from engaging the clutch at at stops... well I have no clue if it does. I doubt that idling in gear to avoid idiots and rear enders... I just don't see how that gives you much chance since those often happen unexpectedly.

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I was taught by ex police instructors neutral, hand covering clutch. Left foot hovering over gear leaver. Logic being clutches used to overheat & get grabby in traffic. I agree with that when I had an XL500 Honda years ago & my XJ900 the same but never an issue on later bikes. I just think the complainers here are unaccepting that BMW boxer gearboxes are agricultural in their operation when compared to Japanese bikes. Get over it & accept as a quirk of boxers. BTW I understand the box fitted to the new 1250’s are sublimely smooth by boxer standards
 

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... I doubt that idling in gear to avoid idiots and rear enders... I just don't see how that gives you much chance since those often happen unexpectedly.
Always keep an eye on your mirrors until everything settles behind you.
 

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Always keep an eye on your mirrors until everything settles behind you.
I nearly always filter between cars and normally line up to allow a car room to "filter" in next to me at stop lights.

If I'm expecting to avoid getting rear ended by moving forward into cross traffic, I'm putting my self at risk doing that as well.

I make a point of tapping my brakes to show I'm there ahead and never occupy the center of the lane. Almost 52 years of riding in a dense urban jungle and have never been touched by a motor vehicle

.yet.

Wildlife, out on the backroads, "touched too much"...
http://colevalley.net/five_twenty


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I nearly always filter between cars and normally line up to allow a car room to "filter" in next to me at stop lights.

If I'm expecting to avoid getting rear ended by moving forward into cross traffic, I'm putting my self at risk doing that as well.

I make a point of tapping my brakes to show I'm there ahead and never occupy the center of the lane. Almost 52 years of riding in a dense urban jungle and have never been touched by a motor vehicle

.yet.

Wildlife, out on the backroads, "touched too much"...
http://colevalley.net/five_twenty


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Towards oncoming traffic would not be my escape route if choice ...



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Well, there goes my interest in a new 1250 :laugh2::laugh2:
I swapped my LC with Mud's Rockster on one of our trips and his assessment was to ask why I didn't just buy a Japanese four as it was so smooth and didn't have a Telelever. A sublimely smooth gearbox would just add further weight to his argument. :|
 
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