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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. Totally happy with my 2020 R except for one relatively minor issue. I purchased it 6 months ago with 15,000 kays and now have 22,000 on it. Bike rides beautifully over all the crappy roads in the Gold Coast (AUS) hinterland where l spend most of my time but it has an annoying front end (l think) crashing sound on certain amplitude bumps. It’s quite random and l can’t usually replicate it. Happens some times but not others. My first thoughts were a floppy front mudguard or centre stand but both of these feel relatively sturdy. Suspension absolutely creamy smooth at all times. Checked everything l can think of to no avail. Sport screen, instruments, shrouds all solid.

A penny for your thoughts

Cheers, Glenn
 

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+1 to Trudd's comment. Had a similar issue with my used 2016 purchased at Max BMW. Went to check head bearings and top nut was found to be only finger tight. I suspect someone adjusted the bearings at the shop and was interrupted before final torque on top nut. Then they forgot. I've seen that movie before. Anyway, Noise went away after I checked adjustment (which was OK) and torqued top nut. No notching felt so likely just happened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your replies. I’ll get the head bearings checked when l’m at my mechanics shop. I’ve ridden without earplugs a bit lately and can report that it doesn’t sound metallic in any way and sounds very ‘plasticky’. I did add a light weight front mudguard extender so l think it’s just the mudguard flapping (l’m a little surprised at how floppy the whole unit is)

Cheers, Glenn from Oz
 

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The special tool makes this an easier task. (Edit)

Follow the tech manual carefully incredibly high torque setting.

Thankfully a friend has one.
 
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With all due respect, I wouldn't call it an easy task. Adjusting them is easy but getting the adjustment correct requires some amount of training/experience. Getting the adjustment wrong can cause serious handling problems that may result in a crash. I'm very well trained and have adjusted and sometimes replaced steering head bearings on hundreds of bikes. I still get it wrong sometimes and have to go back and tweak it a little after riding the bike. Too loose can cause damage to the bearing races. It can also trigger a speed wobble over bumps. Too tight and the bike will want to steer itself. I rode a bike once that had them incorrectly adjusted and hit a sequence of bumps that caused such a wobble that the handlebars were ripped out of my hands and went full lock to lock leaving angular skid marks in both directions. Quite miraculously, and through no particular skill on my part, I didn't crash. I suggest leaving this adjustment to a trained technician or someone you know who really knows what they are doing and has significant experience. I'm a strong proponent of riders doing their own maintenance but IMO the potential downside of getting this wrong just isn't worth it.
 
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