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Imho, there are a number of premium exhaust manufacturers who have established a reputation for themselves over the years. They make the investment into not only their products to ensure they produce claimed power and performance reliably, but also the homologation process required in countries like Germany where aftermarket parts need to be TUV approved. With that comes quality and assurance that their products have passed stringent tests. Akrapovic, Remus, SC Project are 3 of the top available for BMW and all have the requisite homologation. Their prices reflect this. Others are available, but ze Polizei have the right to impound your vehicle if you are found with non-TUV approved equipment on your bike. Buy cheap, buy twice.
Cheap is dear, as my mum used to say.
 

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Looking at a slip on, mostly for looks and growl. Coming up with a ton of ads for GR Moto, but I've never heard of them. Other than Akro, what's out there - and most importantly, what's not crazy expensive?
I just fitted a Delkevic 450mm kit to my 1st gen 1200R & very pleased with it. Nice burbly exhaust note. Not excessively loud (they quote around 100db @ 60%). Good value compared to Akra & Arrow.
 

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I’m awaiting an estimate from Jet-Hot to paint my stock muffler black. However, I’m not convinced that an all black monstrosity would be a big improvement over an all chrome monstrosity. In other muffler news, I looked at the Dr. Jekill & Mr. Hyde skip on. This has electronically adjustable noise level. It looks exactly like the BOS Desert Fox, down to the heat shield, which used to have a mechanical valve to adjust the noise. The only difference is the decal. I’m interested in the relationship since the two companies are based in different towns in Holland.
 

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Dave in NE TN USA
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New Years ride today with the black/carbon Akra I put on three years ago. Euro 3, with the two baffles still in. Spendy, but buy once cry once. Remus, SC Project and others are good, but IMO Akra is the best (OEM on some Beemers).

Cheers, Dave
 

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I still have the Akra in the wings but it has that blappy, geese farts on a muggy day sound I’m not that keen on.
 

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but IMO, Akra is the best (OEM on some Beemers)
There's no doubt about that :). What I was surprised, that at least in the US, it's not the most expensive can. The SC Project beats it by a few bucks, and it's obviously a less expensive can to make than the Akra.

but it has that blappy, geese farts on a muggy day sound I’m not that keen on
Not sure what you're talking about, but the Akra has the best sound of all, after hearing tens of videos. And after hearing it in person, I can honestly tell you it makes the engine sound a lot better than it should. Ha ha. The bottom line is you'll never make our engine sound like an Aprilia V4. Ha ha. But I'm happy this 1250 sounds noticeably better than my ex-1200RT sounded with an Akra as well. It simply will not sound any better than with an Akra, no matter what you put on :). But it's not that bad.
 

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It’s not the level. It’s the timbre. Most all aftermarket cans for this bike are blappy. I don’t see why since it’s a twin with big cylinders. Maybe it’s the boxer configuration. I prefer the roar to the blap. As in the muffled roar of a classic 650 Triumph twin, not obnoxious HD’s. I like the stock R muffler sound. Different strokes.
 

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Mark – Moderator 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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“ Most all aftermarket cans for this bike are blappy”

I suspect a lot of that comes from exhaust path length (shorter) and the lack of chambers to fold the exhaust path. This tends to accentuate the higher frequencies.

Also the engine configuration results in shorter header pipes than a parallel or V twin so doesn’t lend itself to a deep timbre without a folded exhaust path.
 

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“ Most all aftermarket cans for this bike are blappy”

I suspect a lot of that comes from exhaust path length (shorter) and the lack of chambers to fold the exhaust path. This tends to accentuate the higher frequencies.

Also the engine configuration results in shorter header pipes than a parallel or V twin so doesn’t lend itself to a deep timbre without a folded exhaust path.
But the stock sound is not blappy.
 

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Mark – Moderator 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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The stock muffler has a folded exhaust path - if you shine light into one end, you will not see any light looking into the other end.

I expect the 1250 can would be similar but on the 1200, the inlet heads downwards (can’t see where it actually goes from there because of a perforated plate). The exit traces along the top of the muffler then the path folds downwards to meet the inlet path, likely in a chamber, the result being a much longer path than a straight-through design and providing the opportunity to design the chamber to dampen unwanted frequencies.

Like quality aftermarket exhausts, a lot of effort (in this case by LaFranconi in conjunction with BMW Motorrad) goes into designing the stock exhaust to meet performance requirements, emissions regulations, aesthetics and the sound character acceptable to the bike manufacturer. The result is usually bigger than what a lot of customers would prefer, but you can’t beat physics.
 
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My Akra is not 'blappy' at all IMO. It has a very pleasant tone; just moderately louder and deeper than stock (and better looking), which is exactly what I wanted. And that's why it's so heavy (only slightly lighter than stock), so I'm perfectly okay with that. The reality is our engine configuration will never sound 'exotic', so I settle with pleasant :). A final point is the exhaust tone changes a little with dynamic mode, especially at higher rpm, so maybe that has something to do with that. I use road more most of the time (except in the twisties), but might switch to dynamic pro with road ABS in the future. Need to do more testing with that.
 

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I haven’t been able to find an Akra to listen to in person. There’s a side by side comparison of the stock and Akra mufflers on the akrapovic.com web site for the R1250R. Is this accurate or not? Thanks.
 

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It actually sounds better in person, so you cannot rely solely on sound clips. It's not only the recordings, but also your speakers, and mine are not nothing to write home about. Without being able to hear one in person either, I had to go by what was logical to me: BMW wasn't going to approve an inferior system, and it was reported Akra had to make extensive testing on actual bikes before being approved, to avoid losing TQ down low, so I knew I couldn't go wrong with that. And when I found out the Akra was actually cheaper (here in the US... by a few bucks) than my only other option (the SC Project), the decision was immediately made for me. The Akra is a better value for the same money, period. However, I wanted the black one, but was able to find it at Revzilla. And there's no more proof needed it was a specially designed exhaust that engine, that not finding it on any other application. And it looks awesome too. Good luck.
 

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Akra have great licensing with manufacturers - it’s their business model. From making exhausts on Fiat Abarths through to work for motorsport teams and various motorbikes. It’s a business licensing game, and not an issue that their product is necessarily ‘better’ than another. I think Akra are slowly going the way of Termignoni… so they need to be careful. Akra benefit from mass industrialisation to produce exhausts at scale with a certain quality level built in and have business agreements to supply ‘designed’ systems for BMW, but they are heavy and not optimised for performance - unlike other 3rd party designs where weight is also considered a performance factor. Akra need to compromise inline with BMW’s oem constraints.

SC Project make exceptional quality exhausts - as used by a number of top end race teams in WSBK/MotoGP - including HRC themselves (I think it is fair to say that there is NO motorbike race team bigger than HRC to endorse SCP!). If you handle an SCP, they provide a quality that is superlative to Akra - and with significantly less weight. For their design/applications, their performance is also optimised through weight.


Akra is not everything, and it certainly is not the ’best’ exhaust you can get for a motorbike. They look nice, sound nice, and they are designed in a way that enables BMW to back it with a warranty which BMW have to support, not Akra. If you want true performance, there are other options. And FWIW, I don’t have an SCP so my thoughts here are not biased in favour!
 

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2020 R1250R in Pollux Metallic Matte
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Akra is not everything, and it certainly is not the ’best’ exhaust you can get for a motorbike. They look nice, sound nice, and they are designed in a way that enables BMW to back it with a warranty which BMW have to support, not Akra. If you want true performance, there are other options. And FWIW, I don’t have an SCP so my thoughts here are not biased in favour!
I'll throw in a competing perspective. My limited experience (only changed it out on two of my many lifetime bikes) is that the clamor over enhanced performance from an aftermarket exhaust (which can require a remap to function properly) is often overstated and overhyped, and, as was seen from the recent Rikky Tang (YouTube) slip-on fiasco, can sometimes lead to precisely the opposite. It may very well be that in an optimal scenario SCP or others could provide a few extra HP, but for those of us who don't want to gamble and don't care about squeezing out a few extra HP gain for that gamble, and instead just want a plug-and-play, if-it-ain't-broke-don't-fix-it kind of experience that sounds decent and looks a heckuva lot better than the stock chrome cannon, then it seems to me that the Akrapovic is the way to go. It may not be the best, no, but it is the best choice for a buyer that prioritizes a seamless, hassle-free, plug-and-play result.
 

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it seems to me that the Akrapovic is the way to go. It may not be the best, no, but it is the best choice for a buyer that prioritizes a seamless, hassle-free, plug-and-play result.
I don’t think it is the ‘best choice’ for a variety of reasons (subjective looks amongst one of them) as the point I made earlier about other top quality/premium exhaust manufacturers: SCP and Remus also offer seamless, hassle-free, and plug-and-play options. I would never advocate for certain exhausts sold almost exclusively via eBay, but Remus and SCP are supported by large bike manufacturers and, in the case of Remus, also supported by BMW Motorrad dealers in Europe and the UK. (I have no personal experience of the US market for exhaust systems).
 

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Akra had to make extensive testing on actual bikes before being approved,
Umm, yup, that’s the Euro4/5 homologation process. I can post the certificate if you want.

including HRC themselves
Yeah, Aye, good enough for HRC and Marco Marquez, its probably good enough for muggins here.

the clamor over enhanced performance from an aftermarket exhaust (which can require a remap to function properly) is often overstated and overhyped
There is in these Euro 3/4/5 days a world of difference between an end can and a aftermarket exhaust system. I’ve zero interest in aftermarket exhausts. My bike has enough power, almost zero throttle response issues (that small on/off effect irritates a little at times (you know close, then open a little at low speed) but has nothing to do with the exhaust))

But at the end of the day, the CAT is what produces most of the back pressure, so in all probability you can stick anything, or nothing on there, in terms of an end can that you want (Leo Vince expected – which yeah a bit of a surprise - what the heck is that about?). But for me, SC Project looks the best. Take your pick - and if you wanna play it safe go for a product that is homologated.

Rikky Tang (YouTube) slip-on fiasco
Umm, err, umm, mmm. How embarrassing. I mean seriously. When your 130BHP at the rear wheel bike, is stuggling to pull past 115mph........ The usual issue is if you keep the throttle pinned is hanging on to the darn thing - that is not a big problem at 115mph.

Oh, R1250R engine. It sounds cool at low rpm on a wide thottle, but after that. It ain't no six pot Porsche or even a Tuono twin.

Sc Project, here it is looking neat and tidy. Each to their own.

Fuel tank Tire Automotive lighting Wheel Light


I mean seriously - how neat, tidy and cool is that.
 

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Most of us don't want a 'performance' exhaust, which requires remapping. So any such option used/endorsed by racing teams is absolutely useless to me (where power is maximized at the top of the powerband), just like a racing air filter, like K&N. Racing engines have completely different requirements than a street one. A racing can is straight-thru, and as light as possible.

At any rate, my guess is most exhaust brands actually never tried their cans on a R1250 engine; they just make a link pipe to fit their universal cans, and call it a day. And maybe make a universal insert as well, which might be too restrictive for a large 1250 engine. I'm not one who thinks everything done by OEMs is perfect, or that all aftermarket accessories are bad. But it's a lot harder to make a slip-on exhaust that will not lose any power over stock, than a light one to maximize power at the top (with a tune). By the same token, you don't want a restrictive insert that will actually reduce power either, which is what can happen when it's the same for a 600 engine than a 1250. It's a balance that has to be met with at least some testing for each particular engine. And if BMW says it was done with the Akra, I believe it. And the fact the can is unique, it only makes that assumption more believable. But of course, to each his own.

And yes, if you want maximum performance out of your engine, and you're willing to risk your warranty with a tune, then definitely are more options to be considered. But with OEM fit and finish (meaning no bands or springs, and no tune needed), not many. Finally, I hate how some of the 'top' exhausts incorporated their inserts; they look like an afterthought. The Akra looks OEM all around. Not a single indication (like exposed nuts) that it has inserts. But I understand I'm in the minority with my 'anal' expectations. Ha ha. Just glad there's an option for owners like me... and that it's not the most expensive one :).
 

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The homologation process for aftermarket mufflers on road bikes in the EU requires approval for a specific year and model. So, a BOS muffler I’ve looked at is approved for the 2020 R1250GS but not the 2020 R1250R. This must require testing on specific models for which it needs to meet noise and emissions standards. You can buy a Remus Blackhawk with non removable insert which is EU approved and one with a removable insert which isn’t. I suppose there is a hefty penalty if you get caught with an unapproved exhaust, depending on where you live.
 

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Good to know for others, but with those ugly springs, and not even a shield to partially cover them up, it looks horribly out of place on an sporty yet elegant bike like the R1250R IMO. So I didn't even consider it :). To each his own, of course, but for those who don't care about OEM aesthetics, the EU-approved one is a solid choice, of course. To me function is always before form, but if I can have both, that's always my preference. And the Akra is tops on both, so I did what somebody else said: Ordered it, and cried over my smoking credit card later. Ha ha.
 
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