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2011 BMW R1200R
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every set of tires I've had on this bike and even my R1150RS before it have wound up with cupping like this after about 3,000 - 4,000 miles
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Light Synthetic rubber
. Both front and back. My friend with a Ducati says his tires have never worn like this.
But I've also only run Michelin Roads - 3s, 4s and now 5s - for the past decade.
Now it's possible I might not check my air pressure as often as I should and maybe I've been running softer than I should.
So, is this a Michelin thing or a me thing?
 

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Mark – Moderator 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
2015 R1200R Exclusive
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That rear tyre pattern is associated with using a lot of engine braking (lower gear than necessary) or a lot of rear brake, as you tip in. The weight is off the rear and the rear wheel drags a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So we've got one vote for low tire pressure and one vote for excessive rear/engine braking.
Of course it could be a bit of both too.
I hardly ever use my rear brake, but I do downshift prior to major curves for better throttle control, which does translate into some engine braking just before the turn.
I did recently buy a set of Michelin Road 6's. After I put them on, I might need to set myself a reminder to check pressure more diligently.
BTW: Anybody hear any feedback how the 6's compare to the 4's and 5's?
 

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Mark – Moderator 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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but I do downshift prior to major curves for better throttle control, which does translate into some engine braking just before the turn.
A friend had a similar wear pattern on his Honda Crossrunner rear tyres and would bemoan the short tyre life even though he wasn’t a hard rider. To try to combat it, he would wait until the bike was near vertical before accelerating.
Turns out he relied heavily on engine braking, not using the front brake as he rolled into a corner. As mentioned earlier, this unloads the braking tyre, reducing traction and increasing wear.
In fact on a wet run to Phillip Island while I was briskly enjoying the Jamieson-Eildon Rd on my F800 and he trailed well behind, his rear tyre ‘inexplicably’ lost traction in a corner and he slid out - at a much lower pace than I had been enjoying.
 

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I have used Road 4s and 5s on a Hayabusa and an 09 R1200R and never had this issue. I am pretty pedantic about 36 and 42 psi on every ride, double or not. I don't use the back brake and don't use engine braking at all. I have chicken strips to the first line on both tires. I accelerate after the apex and shift around 5000-5500 RPM. Hope it helps.
 

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I’ve been running Road 6 GTs at 2.3 bar and 2.7 bar front and rear, respectively, for the past 5000km to cope with Italian roads lack of grip and have observed cupping as well, so cupping may very well be caused by too low pressure.
 

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Anybody hear any feedback how the 6's compare to the 4's and 5's?
I haven’t felt any performance difference compared to the Road 5. Looking at the wear indicators I did notice that the wear rate between front and rear seems to be a lot more uniform (the 5 front would outlast the rear by quite a bit). The profile of the 6 front has also remained proper round, whereas the 5 would quickly start to flaten at an angle from leaning, if that makes sense.

Overall I’m not sure I like them though. There’s too much of a difference of grip between the 2 compounds and I’ve had 2-3 wobbly situations in roads with less than ideal grip at the lean angle that centers in the border between the 2 compounds. This may be aggravated by the fact that the front also uses 2 compounds (unlike other tires).

I’m planning to switch to Continental Road Attack 4’s when the Road 6 are done to see ifthe single compound strategy at front and rear provides more predictable grip.
 
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