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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A few days ago, I rolled over a fallen tree branch that flipped up and slapped my left handlebar, left hand, and nipped off the end of my clutch lever.
Thankfully, I had on my heavier gloves and sustained only a black and blue pinky finger to go along with my new "shorty" clutch lever. I've run over branches before, but never had one whip up like that. It's always nice to have all your digits present after a vicious whacking. :)
(it happened Here, if you're in the area)
Anyway, after looking over the aftermarket offerings, I decided to get an OEM lever to replace it.
It arrived today, but apparently there is some assembly required.

If I recall there's a piston or pin of some kind that actuates the clutch master cylinder, but after an hour of searching I can't find any handy dandy videos or decent "how to" instructions on how to swap the good lever in.
I suppose I could just tear into it and do what I usually do, (take it apart and take photos) but if anyone has a good reference for this operation, I would appreciate it. :)
Recommendations for folding levers may be in order as well. This seems like a general technical question for all LC 1200/1250 bikes.

Thanks for any wisdom.

---
From another topic: Also: Recently someone here was asking about why there clutch kept slipping, maybe the clutch pin/piston needs adjustment?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
OK, let me answer my own question.
NO BMW Microfiche shows that dam piston, or the f-ing set screw that holds the adjustment in place. Wow...but wouldn't you know some BMWDude has got it perfectally illustrated in color and posted up online?

Check it out! Adjusting the engagement pint of a Wethead Clutch or Brake! (pictorial)

Nice.

But what if I NEEDED a piston, screw or other lever part that is not shown? I guess I would be the "screwed".
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Ok, but as it turns out, the clutch lever has the part with the piston that has to be transplanted to the new lever. I carefully assessed the assembly before I actually removed the brass sleeve that connects them.
The Most Excellent part: The piston and the part it belongs to DO Not Have to be removed. I am going to just separate the 2 main parts and move piston dude over to the new lever, so no adjustment should be needed,

mKay...looks pretty straight forward, but I know that there is a little spring hidden inside there, so I go very cautiously until, "BOING...donk, cling, cling"
Shee ee it. 10 minutes of hunting in my dungeon-like garage and I have it in my hot little hand. It wouldn't have been the end of the world if I lost it, they did include a spare spring and the brass/copper sleeve, right?
But how does this spring fit into the assembled unit? No one has an image that isn't a fiche....
10 minutes figuring out what it does, then how it fits.
I got it.
I realized one good thing, I have the option of buying an aftermarket lever if things are too advanced for my tiny mind, AND I have two sets of parts to make mistakes with.

Once I actually had things all together, all I had to do was get that brass sleeve back into the hole. There are a few things that have to line up just to get it through. One of them is spring loaded with that annoying, but powerful little spring.
Like most highly technical operations is all came down to Brute Force, a little bit of luck, and a leather mallet to encourage the brass sleeve to seat nicely.

I'll take the bike out tomorrow to test the clutch adjustment.

I categorize this one as "Should be easy, but that sleeve is a real *****."
 
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Mark – Moderator 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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First sentence in the introductory chapter of the BMW training manual (not shared with the plebs) - “Vorsicht - all maintenance work must be performed in a sterile clean-room!”
 

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I wondered why there’s a notch in the levers. It’s to sacrifice the end of the lever in an impact rather than risk losing the whole lever. Annoying, but I suppose better than being stuck unable to work the clutch or front brakes.
 

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Dave in NE TN USA
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First sentence in the introductory chapter of the BMW training manual (not shared with the plebs) - “Vorsicht - all maintenance work must be performed in a sterile clean-room!”

“Assembly of Japanese bicycle require great peace of mind.”
~Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Cheers! Dave
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
“Assembly of Japanese bicycle require great peace of mind.”
~Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Cheers! Dave
Words to live by.

Over the years I came to believe that Soichiro Honda and nearly every perfectly-made machine his company built were the one exception to the brutal incompetence of the atutomotive and motorcycle industries.
The ultimate proof for me, was when it took me all of 20 minutes to change the clutch on my VF1000R. It was so perfectly built that even the clutch cover gasket had no need of replacement, the bolts threaded back in to place using only finger pressure, and gladly torqued to perfection without a single grunt, sigh or scowl.
If only Honda made Boxers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wondered why there’s a notch in the levers. It’s to sacrifice the end of the lever in an impact rather than risk losing the whole lever. Annoying, but I suppose better than being stuck unable to work the clutch or front brakes.
Perhaps why our pinky finger can be sacrificed, unless you play guitar or piano, of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Lever Saga Resolved.
As I had hoped, the Clutch Lever adjustment was pretty much identical to what it was prior to the BranchBashing. The contact point roughly at 40% of release. Up on the center stand I observed no drag, and on the road no slipping or other maladjustedness.
So, if you ever want/need to replace the OEM lever due to snappage, the actuator assembly and piston should not need fiddling.
Note: No mention of the piston or past # anywhere in BMW documentation. Gawd help us if we ever need one. I suppose you could shell out the 639.00 USD to get the whole assembly, but even so there is no guarantee that you'd be getting that part.
Buying Just the lever, I got the brass bushing, the spring, and the lever itself. The BMW fiche seems to indicate the actuator assembly and master cyclinder are part of a single item.
Product Automotive lighting Tool Font Parallel
 

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Mark – Moderator 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Words to live by.

Over the years I came to believe that Soichiro Honda and nearly every perfectly-made machine his company built were the one exception to the brutal incompetence of the atutomotive and motorcycle industries.
In contrast to Mazda. One of our offspring once had an old Astina that I maintained. I called it Hirohito’s Revenge. There was so little space to work in the engine bay that maintenance required the delicate hands of a Kimono-clad origami expert - which I did not have. (Delicate hands, that is, not the Kimono or the origami skills. But I stray …)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Serendipity parts:
Here is a "left" clutch. What if I needed a"right" side clutch? Let's all hear it for Ambidextrous Clutches!
Sleeve Carnivore Felidae Font Terrestrial animal
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In contrast to Mazda. One of our offspring once had an old Astina that I maintained. I called it Hirohito’s Revenge. There was so little space to work in the engine bay that maintenance required the delicate hands of a Kimono-clad origami expert - which I did not have. (Delicate hands, that is, not the Kimono or the origami skills. But I stray …)
Ah, so, the Preying Lantis (323, Astina)
Let's not forget how Mazda schlubbed the "Nuclear Option Mitsubishi 3.0" 6 cyl motor into many mid-sized vehicles. The California Air Resources Board put all of them on a list of so-called Gross Polluting engines, the 2nd year of production. As if leaking head gaskets and carbon dioxide were "features".
Mazda also had a decades long marriage to Ford, who was threatened with domestic sanctions for helping to build the Japanese war machine in the late 1930s. As soon as the war ended, business between them resumed. Even so, hte Miata is kind of cute.
 

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I wondered why there’s a notch in the levers. It’s to sacrifice the end of the lever in an impact rather than risk losing the whole lever. Annoying, but I suppose better than being stuck unable to work the clutch or front brakes.
It's also to sacrifice the end of the lever so that extreme force is not extended to the master cylinder/reservoir. If the tip breaks off, no biggie. If you bend the lever at the base, you can mess up the master.
 

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When I “lost” the equivalent on my front brake lever on my previous bike I rolled up a ball of epoxy putty and put that on, painted it black and it’s still on after more than three years…… you may lose a bit of leverage but if it’s a hydraulic clutch I doubt it’ll make much difference. Much cheaper and less faff than a new lever.
 

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The aftermarket options are really very nice. I've observed over the years that the anodizing fades over time, so for the R1200R I bought levers that are sort of a titanium gray, which is what the black winds up being. Nice levers, the adjustment is quite solid, a little machining along the beveled edge that improves grip. Great price, too. Here's the link.

Sports equipment Automotive tire Automotive design Bicycle part Bicycle handlebar
Automotive tire Automotive design Sports equipment Bicycle part Rim
 

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Words to live by.

Over the years I came to believe that Soichiro Honda and nearly every perfectly-made machine his company built were the one exception to the brutal incompetence of the atutomotive and motorcycle industries.
The ultimate proof for me, was when it took me all of 20 minutes to change the clutch on my VF1000R. It was so perfectly built that even the clutch cover gasket had no need of replacement, the bolts threaded back in to place using only finger pressure, and gladly torqued to perfection without a single grunt, sigh or scowl.
If only Honda made Boxers!
so there is no doubt in your mind nor mine that QC, fitment and reliability of Japanese bikes is superior to anything BMW. I agree 100%.
 
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