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Discussion Starter #1
Hello to All,
Just received the R1200R back from the 1000 Klm service, nice to have it back home. The oil sight glass is full, no idea is any overfilling occurred, this is why I will do more of the changes myself.

The final drive oil was replaced as per spec. and I asked if there was any fillings on the drain plug. The tech said that the drain plug is not magnetic ( too small). Seems like a good idea to have a magnetic drain plug.
Any ideas if one exists, lots of info for the GS, the 12R seems like a poor cousin.
Regards John
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dear Clem,
Many thanks.
I have purchased a magnetized engine sump drain plug, I will contact your source for the final drive and gearbox drain plugs. Shame the rear wheel has to be removed.
I must be put together oddly. I am five foot six and can not flat foot ( I struggle). I have found the back brake lever and foot peg at an uncomfortable position. I have bought a brake peg enlarger as I was finding excessive ankle movement was required for slow stopping ( still too heavy handed on the front brakes). But all is good.

Regards John
 

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Johnvw, the brake lever is adjustable. If the angle doesn't work for you, you can move the lever up or down.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dear Las,
Yes I did look at that. I found that when the lever was released it came back to a fixed stop. I wanted the lever higher that this stop position so as to reduce the amount of ankle movement required to activate the brake. I could not see a way of overcoming this fixed stop position, except by increasing the lever peg diameter. An unusual way to make the adjustment, perhaps I have missed something.

Regards John
 

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Dear Clem,
Many thanks.
I have purchased a magnetized engine sump drain plug, I will contact your source for the final drive and gearbox drain plugs. Shame the rear wheel has to be removed.
I must be put together oddly. I am five foot six and can not flat foot ( I struggle). I have found the back brake lever and foot peg at an uncomfortable position. I have bought a brake peg enlarger as I was finding excessive ankle movement was required for slow stopping ( still too heavy handed on the front brakes). But all is good.

Regards John

I know this isn't what you are looking for, but with the linked brakes (front and rear) I never use my foot brake. I also downshift like it's my job and rarely use brakes period. Maybe changing the way you ride is easier and cheaper than new rear sets. I read a good article in motorcyclist where the author was commenting on how good technique for downshifting can make your ride that much more engaging and easier on your wearable parts, if done right. You want to blip the throttle to slightly above where you expect the engine to be before you re engage the clutch and that will almost eliminate all jerkiness associated with poor form. It gets even funner braking and down shifting at the same time, which is actually safer in case you need to accelerate in a pinch to avoid caged drivers! Hope this helps. Keep it on two wheels!
 

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I know this isn't what you are looking for, but with the linked brakes (front and rear) I never use my foot brake. I also downshift like it's my job and rarely use brakes period. Maybe changing the way you ride is easier and cheaper than new rear sets. I read a good article in motorcyclist where the author was commenting on how good technique for downshifting can make your ride that much more engaging and easier on your wearable parts, if done right. You want to blip the throttle to slightly above where you expect the engine to be before you re engage the clutch and that will almost eliminate all jerkiness associated with poor form. It gets even funner braking and down shifting at the same time, which is actually safer in case you need to accelerate in a pinch to avoid caged drivers! Hope this helps. Keep it on two wheels!
I agree with Classic11, and like to ad that it's fun, I like the sound of the revving engine, and exhaust, and I think it helps to learn to control your bike little better.

Now, if money is not a problem, get the slipper clutch plate, downshift with out locking your tire, I was ready to pull the trigger ($1,800 parts and labor) until I knew that the next generation R will come with it from the factory, now I'm just waiting for it.



Slipper Clutch Plate R1200 R 8510034 | BMW Wunderlich America
 

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or just drain it through some cloth

or if you have access, the filter used for looking for passed kidney stones is perfect. Really.

either technique is free and works very well.
 

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+1 on not using the rear brake. It's taking a little time adjusting but I only use the rear brake to hold the bike when stationary now.
 

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Unclear on why to minimize usage of rear brake?
just to save the hassle of replacing? It's not difficult.

I rarely use it also though, and mostly at stoplights to keep from rolling. I also have engine braked my whole driving life, cars and bikes. I did have to replace a clutch, worn out, on my 1150 at 80k miles, so I didn't get the 100k out of a clutch some say is possible.
Didn't bother me that much...80k is a lot of miles and I got to see clutch splines and a final drive--both issues on the 1150. They were both in good shape. I ride the 12 the same way.

The first time I did Deals Gap I was told "don't use your brakes." I remember I used them 2x. It does tend to scream a bit at higher revs:), screams of joy.

Point is, I think these bikes love, love winding out these engines and perform better after doing so. I looked upon a clutch as a wearable item and engine braking does increase the wear, but that's fine.
 
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