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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I hate asking questions - it means I haven't looked hard enough for the answer.

My 2018 R1200R needs a new rear tyre, due to a puncture. Can my 'normal' tyre fitting place fit a new tyre, or is there something that needs to be done to the tyre pressure monitoring kit, meaning it has to be done by someone special charging special prices?

In my search for answers, I've come across people saying their TPMS got damaged during the tyre fitting. Is that a common problem?

Final question - is the pressure measurement done by the valve itself? - ie is it a special valve, or is there something else going on in there? If it's the valve, I guess I don't want it to be accidentally replaced with a conventional one!

Thank you muchly.
Mike.
 

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Hey Mike

The sensors are screwed to the centre of the rim in the vicinity of the valve-stem - there should be a sticker on the side of the rim to indicate the location.

Any tyre fitter should have no problem keeping it safe from damage - just make sure they know the wheel has a sensor.
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks so much for the info and clarifying images. It looks like a bit of a beast, to be honest, and I can see why an unwitting tyre dude could end up giving it a wack.
I'll go ahead and get it booked now; going to try a Michelin Road 5.

Thanks again,
Mike.
 

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Hi all,

I hate asking questions - it means I haven't looked hard enough for the answer.

My 2018 R1200R needs a new rear tyre, due to a puncture. Can my 'normal' tyre fitting place fit a new tyre, or is there something that needs to be done to the tyre pressure monitoring kit, meaning it has to be done by someone special charging special prices?

In my search for answers, I've come across people saying their TPMS got damaged during the tyre fitting. Is that a common problem?

Final question - is the pressure measurement done by the valve itself? - ie is it a special valve, or is there something else going on in there? If it's the valve, I guess I don't want it to be accidentally replaced with a conventional one!

Thank you muchly.
Mike.
Any shop can do the tire change. The TPMS is up by the valve on the inside of the rim and as long as it’s not hit or disturbed it’ll be fine. I’ve had my TPMS read all screwy once a new tire is fitted and I deflate the tire and re inflate it slowly to reset it. They have taken their time with me to read correctly but always seem to normalize after a few hundred miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Any shop can do the tire change. The TPMS is up by the valve on the inside of the rim and as long as it’s not hit or disturbed it’ll be fine. I’ve had my TPMS read all screwy once a new tire is fitted and I deflate the tire and re inflate it slowly to reset it. They have taken their time with me to read correctly but always seem to normalize after a few hundred miles.
It's a worry to me as it's mostly out of my hands; Due to this 'lockdown', I'm going to a different tyre place (well I'm not going personally, somebody is taking the wheel for me as I'm 'shielding' a vulnerable family member). I've spoken to them on the phone a couple of times about it and I get the feeling that they're happier doing car tyres. It might be nothing, but the vibes aren't particularly good ones.

I'll report back.
 

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I am not sure exactly where you are in East Yorkshire but I would take it to someone you can trust. I use Barry Robson on York (and the pressure reads correctly as soon as you set off with the new tyre - no "settling down period"). I think there is a tyre place in Malton which handles bike tyres and was suggested to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am not sure exactly where you are in East Yorkshire but I would take it to someone you can trust. I use Barry Robson on York (and the pressure reads correctly as soon as you set off with the new tyre - no "settling down period"). I think there is a tyre place in Malton which handles bike tyres and was suggested to me.
I'm in the Beverley area, Keith. I've used a place in Malton a few times in the past - it's not exactly nearby, but the ride there and back was nice; they even loaned me a paddock stand and tools so I could remove the wheel! My last few tyres have been from Miles Kingsport in Hull, no issues at all. This time around though, I'm somewhat limited by the kind person offering to do the running around. It's fine really, I'd just prefer to be there myself.
 

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When I punctured I didn't like the idea of someone smashing my TPS so got the bike taken to Barry Robson - not handy but safe! You also don't have to dismantle the bike yourself. I am in Scarborough.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When I punctured I didn't like the idea of someone smashing my TPS so got the bike taken to Barry Robson - not handy but safe! You also don't have to dismantle the bike yourself. I am in Scarborough.
Scarborough, nice.
My BMW dealer of choice these days is Marshalls at Laceby. I can only think of one bad thing to say about them - they sold me a R1200R Sport... I only want in to get my 1200S serviced! ;)
 

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Grimsby is a bit far for me - York is far enough. Also, if I go to York to drop the bike off for a service, in normal circumstances I would ride up to Helmsley on the loan bike for a nice lunch.
 

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Sounds great; I bet you look forward to each service :D
My routine is to drop the bike off at Laceby, then explore the Lincolnshire roads (and also get food somewhere along the way!). (y)
 

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The problem is, they usually lend me a 310. It seems like I have stolen it from a child, it's so tiny. Also, I haven't owned a bike with less than 50BHP since 1976. Maybe I should feign interest in an R1250GS next time?
 

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The problem is, they usually lend me a 310. It seems like I have stolen it from a child, it's so tiny. Also, I haven't owned a bike with less than 50BHP since 1976. Maybe I should feign interest in an R1250GS next time?
I had one of those the last time. Normally I'll take anything, I like to try something different, but I was glad to give that thing back. I know what you mean about the power - I struggled to set off without stalling, and at 'A' road speeds I thought it was going to explode or just shake itself to death.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I just thought I would provide the promised update.
The tyre change has been done and all is well. Both tyre pressures have appeared on the dash and are reading correctly. All is well.

Thanks, all, for your advice.
Mike.
 

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Further to your original question, yesterday while out riding, (1200R Excl) my TPMS warning lights started to flash showing I was losing air from the rear tyre.
I rode very slowly as I could not feel any difference. the pressure went down to 1.6.
I left it at workshop who have changed my tyres in the past, and the tyre had not punctured, or lost air.
Do the TPMS have their own power source? I think they must, so can they go wrong?
 

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TPMS sensors should have batteries. A button cell lithium can last a very long time. I’m not sure how long they last...may depend on the car/bike. I know with the Prius, some owners found a way to disassemble the units to change the batteries rather than pay for new units.

From TPMS Sensors Replacement Timing: When Installing New Tires?

The lithium ion batteries inside TPMS sensors may last anywhere from five to 10 years. Five to six years is a more typical lifespan for older TPMS sensors. TPMS sensors don’t broadcast a continuous signal but only broadcast when the vehicle is in motion. Even then, the signal is intermittent to conserve battery life.
 

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Do the TPMS have their own power source? I think they must, so can they go wrong?
They’re battery powered, and as ZNG note, Maripon, should last several years. If the battery voltage drops below a certain level a warning will display on the instrument panel, so it wouldn’t seem to be a battery issue.

What pressure did the measure the tyre at?

Did they check the front tyre pressure? (Possible the sensors are linked to the RDC/TPM back to front?)
 

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They’re battery powered, and as ZNG note, Maripon, should last several years. If the battery voltage drops below a certain level a warning will display on the instrument panel, so it wouldn’t seem to be a battery issue.

What pressure did the measure the tyre at?

Did they check the front tyre pressure? (Possible the sensors are linked to the RDC/TPM back to front?)
Firstly, thank you for your answer.

About 2 months ago I had a puncture. Had the tyre changed at the workshop I dropped my bike of yesterday.
Since then, I have always been apprehensive. So while riding yesterday I monitor my TPMS quite often.
The front was reading 2.7. When the warning came on the rear was reading 1.6 and did not go lower.

I must stress that I am not technical minded, so always use main dealers for my servicing etc. This is my second R since 2010 during that period I owned a R9T.

Is this my 'jonah' bike?
 
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