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Discussion Starter #81
It’s virtually impossible to predict what Motul 10W would be like, @home4sale. Despite the viscosity designation, no two fork oils are alike - they vary in their response to temperature variations.

I’m planning to stick with the BMW 11.5W rather than experiment further. Castrol 10W was better than the old 7.5W oil used by BMW when they built my bike, but the 11.5W is better again in its damping characteristics, from my seat of the pants perspective.

There are no other seals/washers that need to be changed. A little weeping is not unusual and can normally be resolved by popping the dust seals down and cleaning the main seals using a Sealmate or similar. It’s highly unlikely yours would be worn or damaged at that mileage. I’ve got a set of All Balls seals and dust covers ready to fit at my next change just as a precaution (Der Panzer has done over 80,000 km).
 

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$380 USD quote and $63 less if I just bring the forks over to them. I rather put the money towards purchasing the BMW tool (not that I will do that either). There are third party compression tools for far less. It was interesting to see a third hand on the pic in Haynes manual and that WAS funny and I could relate to the joke Pz (ok to shorten your name Panzerman?) made earlier.

Any recommendations on a third party tool? I don’t mind spending up to $150, it’ll pay for itself. Otherwise, I’ll try to put together home mad options.


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Discussion Starter #83
When I researched hold-down tools prior to commencing my first fork oil change, nothing seemed to match what was required to grip the top sleeve that BMW specifies as the compression point. Hence I simply used a cam-lock tie-down strap on the home-made tool recommended by Haynes. If you had an able assistant, you could probably do away with the strap, but it’s nice to be able to lock things in place.
 

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Youtubing and I see a lot of folks not going through the whole cam-lock tie-down procedure at all; just pumping it a few times to shake loose what they can. It appears you can get 90% or so of the old oil that way. Is that true? I realize, it's not optimal scenario but curious on thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Compressing the fork then holding it in place is so that the components can be disassembled, then the oil level set without the spring when refilling. Setting it by volume is very imprecise, unless you can somehow capture every cc drained, then measure the precise amount for refilling - I’d like to see that!
 

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Editing to avoid repeat of the same questions that had been asked before, ex. post 2/3 etc. To summarize then, the idea is that when you disassemble, you have taken out 100% of the old fluid and then when you add manufacturer recommended volume of fluid, it will lead to more precision than other methods. Perhaps, I should go over this entire post again in more detail and then ask questions. Thx

I can't make heads and tails out of this and how it relates to BMW specs so went ahead and forked over for BMW oil (11.5W); pun intended. Comparative Oil Weights Table - Transmoto

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Discussion Starter #87
You add about the specified volume, but then measure the oil level (actually the air gap down from the top of the fork outer to the oil) and add/remove oil to get the level to spec.
 

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I just completed my fork oil change on my 2015 LC with ESA. I want to thank Panzerman for his excellent write-up that answered questions I had. The Haynes manual was also very helpful. I went quite a distance past the allotted 18,000 mile interval. 32,000- oops. But the oil although noticeable darker did not have any metal wear pieces in it. I’ve seen much dirtier oil from dirt bike forks with only a season of use (about 1500 miles). The procedure went fairly smooth with the same issues Panzerman had. I used the BMW 11.5 oil and the fill specks matched the Haynes manual information. The finished result is a little bit plusher than before ( not a harsh) but such a slight difference it could be in my head. It worked good before and works good now. Thanks again Panzerman. And no my tape job was nowhere near his.
 
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