BMW R1200R Forum banner

101 - 107 of 107 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Thanks for the feedback and my bike is getting close to the 30k mark so it is planned for the end of our Canadian riding season.

I will be prepared for dissembling but maybe tempted with the “Dump and run” if able to extract 99% of the oil. And yes, the Left fork concerns me too.

Also planning to clean and lubricate the seals additionally as an interim step with forks on the bike between the Fork oil change.

Great thread.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Panzermann

·
Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
Joined
·
5,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #102
Looking at Dave Moss's answers to questions on his dump-and-run videos, he recommends a full strip every 10,000 miles of road riding (16,000 km - twice as frequent as BMW's service schedule) and a dump-and-run every 3000 miles (5000 km) to limit the amount of metal accumulation.

A further point in relation to the dump-and-run technique is the accuracy you're aiming for with the filled oil level (for ESA, the spec is 75 mm and 80 mm for the LH and RH forks respectively). With a measuring jug being around an estimated 6-7 times the area of the fork tube (at the measuring point), any error in the measured replacement oil level in the jug will be amplified by this proportion in the filled oil level. That is, a 1 mm error in the jug will result in say 6-7 mm error in oil level setting within the fork. A measuring cylinder would be more accurate, although may require the use of a funnel to catch the old oil, and would be more difficult to clean out the old oil/debris (maybe rinse with kerosene/paraffin).

109252
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ontrip

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
I recall having the same questions. If I had to do it all over again, I would go through removal of springs. This was my first time. The next one will be pump and dump and I may just alternate the full vs partial moving forward. I think the trouble wouldn’t be worth it each time but fwiw, that last percent or two had more crap than the rest of the oil. So, if it’s the first ever, maybe consider removing springs?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ontrip

·
Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
Joined
·
5,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #104
It’s certainly a useful technique if you simply wish to change oil viscosity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
If you're doing a dump and pump, particularly if using the same fluid type, then it'll be more accurate to weigh the jug and old fluid that comes out, using digital kitchen scales, then refilli the emptied and cleaned jug with fresh fluid to the same weight, refill should be accurate to 1 gram (a bit less than 1ml). Unless, as PM suggests, some fluid gets spilt.
 

·
Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
Joined
·
5,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #106
I thought if that, @Sprigger (having done that to check how much oil the dealer put in my replacement rear drive - ~20g less than what I normally drain, conforming they’d use the refill volume rather than initial fill).

I was hesitant to suggest that though given the metallic contamination - I expected to be challenged on that, and have no authoritative answer on how much difference the metal would make. (Likely minimal)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
First Fork Oil Change completed!

Just completed the Fork oil change on my 2017 R12R using Panzermann’s tutorial and notes and the illustrated Step by step Service Manual from raesgar28

As the bike is about to reach 30,000 kms, I completed the 30k inspection including an oil change with BMW Advantec and Filter and took the valve covers off to check the valve clearance ( done at 20k inspection) and inspect the camshaft surfaces.

Also purchased the “Gold Standard” BMW Fork oil for an astonishingly low $CDN 24.34 from my local BMW dealership.

Spring compressor (Home built)
Purchased a 3 inch PVC pipe coupling and 2 6 inch X 9/16 lag bolts and some nuts and washers from Home Depot
A $5 ratchet strap to hold the compressed spring in place under tension made the job easier and basically eliminated the need for the slotted washer.

Fork Oil Level
The Motion Pro Fork oil level gauge I purchased a few years ago to do my F800r re-spring came in handy for setting the oil levels

The actual work after the bike was taken apart took about 4 hours with the help of my son where a second pair of hands help like the fork removal from the bike and compressing the springs.

Overall, apart from compressing the spring, the servicing is pretty straightforward with basic tools.

A friend suggested adding masking take to the wrench jaws to remove the fork cap nuts and that made a big difference in protecting them from marks.

Ended up having to use a piece of wire coat hanger instead of the suggested rubber hose as I discovered that hose was too loose fitting over the damper rod.

With the front end apart, took the opportunity to give the front calipers a good cleaning removing the brake pads and cleaning the disk with brake cleaner.
Will bleed the brakes in the spring before the season starts.

Have taken the bike for a short test ride but could not determine a significant change but it was only a short ride before putting it away for the Canadian winter.

575B3AED-6E34-4453-95CB-21C2C90EFA31.jpeg
4736190D-AAFE-426C-957A-ACD078C8E3C3.jpeg
E288D917-9735-4AF5-A8F4-EE12F2CF89B5.jpeg
 
101 - 107 of 107 Posts
Top