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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an ongoing saga I have been trying to fiddle with the bar angle on the 2015 LC. It always seems to make the insides on my thumbs ache. Any suggestions?

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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Any suggestions?
Grip the bars more lightly?

Hard to know what you mean by bar angle. Up/down, grip angle, sweep-back, width (and hence wrist angle).

Other than bar-backs, or rotating the bars a little, there’s not much else you can do with the stock bars. You could replace them, using your (presumably satisfactory) last bike as a guide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sad thing is that I think I suit clip on style more. I swept them towards me more hoping it would angle the outside down and therefore reduce stress in thumb hold

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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Sad thing is that I think I suit clip on style more. I swept them towards me more hoping it would angle the outside down and therefore reduce stress in thumb hold
Sounds like you’re applying a strong rather than light grip on the bars, riding with very straight arms (rather than relaxed with bent elbows) or you have a physiological issue with wrist rotation, in which case consulting a physiotherapist might be in order.
 

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In an ongoing saga I have been trying to fiddle with the bar angle on the 2015 LC. It always seems to make the insides on my thumbs ache. Any suggestions?

Sent from my ASUS_I001DC using Tapatalk
I rode Harley-Davidson motorcycles for years; I still have one that I haven't ridden in a long time. Harley's bikes are plagued with horrible stock handlebars...well, most of the time. The bars on the Sportster are pretty good, the bars that came on my Dyna Super Glide were of the 'buckhorn' variety and they were better suited to being mounted on a plow that was pulled by a mule than on a motorcycle. But both motorcycles had issues with the overall handlebar configuration.

The Sportsters bars were too low. Even though the angle of the bars relative to my wrists were good, being so low and too far forward put a lot of pressure on my neck, shoulders, elbows, and wrists. This started causing some punched nerves in my wrist as well as pain in my wrists and shoulders. The standard Harley solution was to use 'risers" which elevated the bars and moved them closer to the rider. The risers allowed me to ride in a position that didn't impact of the performance of the bike while completely doing way with the pain and what could have turned into long-term pinched nerves in the neck.

The problem with the Dyna bars were probably closer to what you are experiencing. The bar angle relative to my wrists was horrible. It put a lot of stress on my wrists and hands in general. A new set of handle bars with a bar/wrist angle similar to the Sportster resolved that problem. But the new bars were too far forward and just a little low. A set of 'risers' fixed everything and the Dyna remains one of the most comfortable motorcycles that I have ever ridden.

I put risers on my 2015 R1200R only because the bars were a bit too far forward for me. The bar/wrist angle was perfect, in my opinion. While there are a lot of characteristics of handlebar placement relative to how far forward or how high, the bar/wrist angle is almost universal for almost all riders. You want your wrists to be comfortable straight on the horizontal axis, and you don't want the bars to be too high or low to the point where your wrists are stressed on the vertical axis. Adjusting the bars by rotating them up or down in the clamps can significantly change the relationship between your wrist angle and the bars. Even small adjustments can have an impact on comfort.

In some cases, wrist/hand discomfort can be caused by lack of conditioning of the muscles, arthritis, and a lifetime of accumulated injuries and stress. A good orthopedist who specializes in hands and wrists can give you some guidance if the condition that you describe cannot be resolved through more convention modification to your motorcycle.

Riding in pain is, painful and takes away from the experience, not to mention the possibility of causing chronic injury. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you so much. You have made me think about it. I might invest in risers. I agree with everything you said. It is all about your body vs the hands. Sports bikes with clip ons work because the body is hunched. This isn't and so I am creating a false hunch. Interesting. Thank you.

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In an ongoing saga I have been trying to fiddle with the bar angle on the 2015 LC. It always seems to make the insides on my thumbs ache. Any suggestions?

Sent from my ASUS_I001DC using Tapatalk
If you want to try risers I have a surplus set I'd be happy to sell for a reasonable price.

The '16 came with risers. Took them off the first week. The bars were still too high and back for my comfort. Because of BMW's non-standard bar center diameter normal aftermarket handlebars won't work without shims. Clip-ons won't work because of other stuff in that area. I installed an RS handlebar and am happy with it.
 

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I also have a 2015 LC. At first I lived the bars and the bike was far more comfortable than my racy R1200S. After a while I started to have issues with the handlebars and hand comfort, especially the thumbs. I discovered that a combination of my gloves, foam grips and very minor bar angle adjustments resolved my issues. It might sound crazy but try different gloves and quality foam grips.
 
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In an ongoing saga I have been trying to fiddle with the bar angle on the 2015 LC. It always seems to make the insides on my thumbs ache. Any suggestions?

Sent from my ASUS_I001DC using Tapatalk
I've learned that adding grippy material where my knees touch the bike makes a huge difference in keeping my weight and braking loads off my hands.

 

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Grip puppies? Would be a simpler and cheaper solution than risers, if they fix the problem for you.
 
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