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Hello everyone. I live in Saco, Maine and I am very interested in BMW bikes primarily for their quality and safety. At age 15, I started with a Lambretta 125, at 17 moved up to a Honda 305 and then to a Yamaha Scrambler. I drove for a total of 6 years and can honestly say that I know the value of ABS brakes first hand. That was 40 years ago.

I am taking the Maine Motorcycle Course (20 hours) at the end of the month, the only bike I have ridden since 1969 is human powered.

I am interested in the R1200R and feel that if I take it slow and just drive in my quiet neighborhood for a while, the old reflexes will return fairly quickly.

Any thoughts on this will be appreciated.

Nice to be here.
 

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Hello everyone. I live in Saco, Maine and I am very interested in BMW bikes primarily for their quality and safety. At age 15, I started with a Lambretta 125, at 17 moved up to a Honda 305 and then to a Yamaha Scrambler. I drove for a total of 6 years and can honestly say that I know the value of ABS brakes first hand. That was 40 years ago.

I am taking the Maine Motorcycle Course (20 hours) at the end of the month, the only bike I have ridden since 1969 is human powered.

I am interested in the R1200R and feel that if I take it slow and just drive in my quiet neighborhood for a while, the old reflexes will return fairly quickly.

Any thoughts on this will be appreciated.

Nice to be here.
Welcome and you'll love this bike. When I purchased my R1200R last winter I had not ridden a bike for 14 years. I took the MA two day safety course to get back into the swing of things and a year later I have just over 10K miles on my bike.

You'll get back into it quickly and the bike is a major part of that. It is light, agile and simply a great package. It does well as a commuter, touring and run about bike. Good luck and post some pics once you get yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
fleuger99,

Thanks for the encouragement. I am really excited to get going on this. I'm thinking about the classic option.
 

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Welcome! I've found that the R12 is actually quite a bit easier to ride than some of the smaller bikes with higher centers of gravity. I had a BMW G650gs before my R12 and did not find it to ride nearly as solidly as the 12. The very low CG and boxer engine gives it an almost gyroscopic stability. Add in traction control and antilock, and you can ride it almost anywhere, which is good because where you live is just south of NoWhere, weatherwise. . .:)
 

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and you can ride it almost anywhere, which is good because where you live is just south of NoWhere, weatherwise. . .:)
Yes, I resemble that remark. :001_rolleyes: I mostly intend to ride for recreation, not commuting. I can pretty much pick my days but you can never rely on the weather up here in Maine. Mrs. might get upset if she gets wet but reminded me we had rain suits for the Yamaha.
 

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Hey mewguy, welcome.

I think you sound mature enough to get a bike this caliber after many years of not riding, it doesn't sound like you are going to be pulling some wheelies or stuff like that.

Just like DrDave, I find this bike to be easier to ride then many other smaller lighter displacements, also more comfortable and that itself make it safer, now add the ABS and the whole packages, and you are set to enjoy many years of riding.

Good luck and don't forget to bring some Allagash on your first trip to NY
 

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I can relate. I live in the Chicago area, and we get our summers from Mexico and our winters from the Arctic circle. I've been voting to reverse this but for some reason it never gets approved. I've ridden my R12 down into the teens, and up into 90-100 "this is a big mistake" weather. The bike just takes it all in stride. Bottom line, you'll love it. Consider getting hand guards, and a Stebel Nautilis 139db horn to add to the BMW's weeny-horn. Hoshiko and others will also suggest big LED lights for conspicuity, because, really, if you are thrown into Canada by a logging truck which didn't see your cute little R12 painted in HitMe Grey. . .well, who would even look for you? :) Best to be visible and loud. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Some of the other bikes I looked at are Triumph Bonneville t100 and the Honda NC700x and CB500X ABS. I eliminated the Bonneville, although I loved the retro looks of it, because it has no ABS brakes and no way to put them on. I feel the Honda with ABS would have been ok, but I probably would have traded it in after a year for the R12.

I am 66 and I am probably having a "senior crisis" because I am too old for the mid-life kind. Not going to go crazy with this bike. I intend to take it slow and let the reflexes come back.

I can tell from the replies I have gotten to my Welcome Post that this forum is going to be a great place for me to work out my "issues".

Here is a picture the way we were in 1968. We are ready to seriously update this photo with some new iron. :D
 

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The Bonnie is sweet, No real problems with it; it's the best of a class of retro bikes and easy to knock around. I think you can now get a Bonnie with ABS. The Bonnie might be easier for 2-up heightwise

The Honda NC700 is underpowered but of course high Honda quality. The new CB's are a kick, but a small kick.

The R12 is just a different league bike; really twice the power and torque of the others; shaft drive. It's comparing a Timex to a Rolex. They're both good, but. . . :)
 
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