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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Frame plugs bought from Nippy Normans in the UK. The plugs are a model-specific set by Wunderlich.
Will search for that. Thank you for your help.

So I got a spare plastic key.
That's a good alternate solution; thank you for your help too. May I ask how much did you pay? The only thing I don't like is it can actually start the bike, so I'd keep it at home. You know, it might not be a bad idea to order another one to keep home and one on the bike... if not crazy expensive.
 

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It wasn’t expensive, I think less than $50 or $60. And it also opens my luggage. But speak of the Devil! My bike just told me my fob battery was down to 50%, but not to worry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Be aware you can open the battery compartment with your fingers, after deploying the key. Don't use a screwdriver, like the inept tech did at my dealer, mangling the plastic at several places:mad:. And yes, battery was dead after 2+ years of sitting.
 

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The irony of this thread is probably lost on some. "Keyless" is not keyless, it is an electronic key to replace a steel key. But riders have to carry extra "keys" just in case, and keep them in separate locations? And then the battery is another maintenance item? Reprogramming if you lose your fob and that means a trip to the dealer? And lose the fob? How much more than a regular key? And the selling point is it is more convenient? Sticking a steel key in a lock is too much effort? All the owners of bikes with the electronic key fob, do all of these riders replace their house and business locks with electronic locks for the convenience? Bathroom door locks? Postal box? Tool box? All those separate fobs should make life more convenient? Maybe BMW will sell everyone an attractive purse to carry multiple fobs for the ease of opening all those locks. A photographers vest with multiple pockets, not for film but fobs. Maybe a fashion statement with a necklace full of bobs.
 

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Finally chiming in on this thread.

I really like not having to get out a key, having it rattle on the dash, and having to remember to take it with me. When I had a keyed ignition bike, there were too many times that I had to take my gloves off and go digging in my pockets because I forgot to get the key out. I had more trouble with the keyed ignition not functioning due to numerous issues - water washing crud into the keyhole, a worn key, a stuck tumbler that wouldn't turn.

I have had zero issues with the keyless system. It may happen someday if I don't keep fresh batteries around. If it does, I may feel differently. However - I have as much chance getting the bike stolen as I do having an issue with the ignition. Given the nature of keyless ignition, that makes theft less likely. If I happen to be standing close enough for a thief to start it, they'll only get so far (less than 200 miles unless they catch me at the gas station filing up) before the bike won't start once they turn it off. The lock can't be picked or bypassed to start it that I know of. So there's that.

An extra key for the luggage isn't necessary unless your locks are REALLY messed up, the key in the fob is plenty strong enough, and I don't ever expect it to fail in normal (repeat normal, not trying to wrench the locks beyond reasonable force) use.

If keyless ever does fail and strands me, I've got AAA to get it to a dealer for repairs, with 200 mile free towing. Until that happens, I'm going to enjoy not having to get the key out of my pocket, and being able to just hop on, push a button, and ride off into the sunset.

Sometimes, you can take planning for every eventuality a little too far, and make owning and riding a beautiful piece of machinery like these a lot less enjoyable than it needs to be...
 

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An extra key for the luggage isn't necessary unless your locks are REALLY messed up, the key in the fob is plenty strong enough, and I don't ever expect it to fail in normal (repeat normal, not trying to wrench the locks beyond reasonable force) use.

If keyless ever does fail and strands me, I've got AAA to get it to a dealer for repairs, with 200 mile free towing. .
Good points on worn keys or stuck tumblers.
I agree the luggage locks work with little or no effort. Our seat locks are the locks that can be very stiff and I have heard complaints on seat locks from others.
As for towing there's plenty of times we're more than 200 miles from a dealer on trips :)
 

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You don't need to carry a spare battery - just put the key in the "emergency" position if the battery is flat.
I removed the battery from the fob. It’s too thick to slide under the rear seat and putting it up against the rear seat didn’t work. However, removing the rear seat and placing the fob in back of the front seat did work.
 

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The dealer was keen for me to select the keyless £285 ignition option. Yes £285 to solve a problem that does not exist. As I pointed out to the dealer, if it was standard, I’d happily pay a wee bit extra to have a good old fashioned keyed ignition instead. Keyless ignition is expensive pointless junk.

At the end of the day, what you have on your bike is a keyed switch. The key allows you to close a contact which turns the bike on. It is an on/off switch. It is very simple (well plus an immobiliser circuit)

For keyless, add in batteries, transmitter and receiver, electronic printed circuit boards – a whole host of technology to open and close a contact.

Given the nature of keyless ignition, that makes theft less likely.
Keyless vehicles are more likely to get stolen than keyed vehicles. Some insurance companies have increased premiums for keyless vehicles. Some police forces in the UK are advising owners of fancy cars with keyless ignition to use aftermarket steering locks to prevent their cars from being nicked.

Here’s a keyless Merc being nicked. No noise, no fuss, all thanks to keyless ignition.

 

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There was one new R at my only BMW dealer and it was loaded with “the package”.
 

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Keyless vehicles are more likely to get stolen than keyed vehicles.
I would not be surprised in the US it doesn't matter what type of key you have.
BMW motorcycle theft is rare in the US but when it happens it's probably several guys loading it into a truck and parting it out later.
 
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There was one new R at my only BMW dealer and it was loaded with “the package”.
Yeah, from what I can see the ordering process in the USA practically forces you to have keyless.

From what I can see the showroom bikes in the UK almost always have keyless, but if you spec your own bike it is easy to avoid – that’s certainly the case for the R1250R.

I would not be surprised in the US it doesn't matter what type of key you have.

BMW motorcycle theft is rare in the US but when it happens it's probably several guys loading it into a truck and parting it out later.
Yeah, over here they steal em every which way. Fortunately, where I am (fingers crossed touch wood etc etc) it isn’t too bad, but in other areas you gotta be very careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
I removed the battery from the fob. It’s too thick to slide under the rear seat and putting it up against the rear seat didn’t work. However, removing the rear seat and placing the fob in back of the front seat did work.
Awesome work DougL. Good to know we don't actually need the plastic key on the bike now. Plus I'd need to remove the damn seats to get it anyway, so same crap to just put the dead fob there instead :). Thank you. By the way, since the keyless system allows you to open the gas tank without a key, I actually liked it yesterday. I often had to undo my gloves, to fish the damn key in my pocket. Ha ha. For bikes that still require you to pull out the key to refuel, I'd much better just have a freaking key for everything. This one is actually nice. Yes, there's more that could go wrong with the bike... but hopefully it won't happen :).
 

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I have this around my neck for each long ride. I have lost the fob a few years back. It having escaped my jacket pocket. Lucky I was just 40 mins away, I did get a warning on the TFT though. I was still able to ride around to look for it with not much luck! But during the search and return home, I could not stop the engine, as it will not restart without the fob. Cost me over AUD$500 to replace and a few weeks wait, hard lesson learnt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
That's one of my worries too. And if that happens, the green key under the seat would be of absolutely no help. I've been calling everywhere locally, and nobody can cut a 'side winder' key :(. So the best alternative would be to order a 2nd plastic key, and put it somewhere on the bike (inside a frame protector is a great idea). Even if a thief were to find it, it'd be rare that he knew what to do with it to start the bike. Ha ha. The other option for me would be to leave the fob inside my tail bag, and just take it with me if I park the bike for lunch, etc. If you happen to go down, the fob would probably get messed up if in your pocket, so that's another consideration. I always put my wallet and phone in the tail bag. And it's more comfortable too.
 

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‘12 R1200R Classic | ‘15 R1200RT | ‘19 C650GT
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The keyless feature on my RT is fabulous. One-touch central locking of both panniers, the trunk, and the two glove boxes, using either the fob or the central locking button on the right grip, bike running or not. It’s very convenient. I think the only thing BMW left out was the ability to lock the Nav in its cradle, electronically-adjustable mirrors, and electronically-adjustable seat height.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
And how about an electric center stand? It was a nice gizmo on an old K1200 tourer I test rode some time back. Oh, and my old brick had power brakes; Remember those 'whizzy' brakes? I used to like them, but not bleeding them (14 freaking valves to bleed). Good old times. Ha ha.
 
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