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Discussion Starter #1
After having been ordered from Nippy’s in the UK, the Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing and screen finally arrived today.

Contained in a HUGE box and extremely well-protected, everything looked pretty good.

I have just completed a pre-paint assembly of the main bits, just for my own satisfaction that everything’s there and that it will work, so off to the painter tomorrow, then installation asap thereafter.

It promises to be a time-consuming but not too difficult task – more fiddly than anything – but I’ll take some pix and post a story about the installation when it’s all completed and working.

Lawrence of Suburbia

Outer Brisbane, SE Queensland, Australia

2012 R1200R: Montego Blue with ABS, ESA, RDC, OBC, Puig rear hugger, Stebel Magnum horn, Grip Puppies, ss oil-cooler guard, Abdeckring installed, Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing.

 

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can't wait, more pics the better :001_smile:
 

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I would also like to know if the installation is fairly easy and quick so that you can install it for longer trips and then uninstall it for city riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would also like to know if the installation is fairly easy and quick so that you can install it for longer trips and then uninstall it for city riding.
The fairing is now with the painter and I won't get it back until the end of the first week in July (about ten days time), but I can at least partially answer this one now, I think, having already done a sort-of pre-assembly when the kit arrived.

I doubt you would want to be doing an uninstall/ reinstall more than about once a year! It's not going to be difficult (fingers crossed!) but tricky, fiddly, time-consuming.

One of the mounting points of the assembled fairing onto the bike is via the relocated front turn indicator (each side) and the access to that is impossible unless the whole lower bracket assembly is taken off the fairing. To explain a bit further/ better, the brackets are first mounted onto the fairing then the whole assembly put onto the bike, rather than vv, if that makes sense.

Some people love 'fiddling', as indeed I do, but I doubt I'd want to be thinking about regular removal and then replacement of the whole kit too frequently!

I'll put the clock on the job when I start installation and include that observation in my notes. Stay tuned!

Meantime. MR MODERATOR, please, is there any (reasonable) limit to the number of pix I can attach to my article?

Lawrence of Suburbia

Outer Brisbane, SE Queensland, Australia

2012 R1200R: Montego Blue with ABS, ESA, RDC, OBC, Puig rear hugger, Stebel Magnum horn, Grip Puppies, ss oil-cooler guard, Abdeckring installed, Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing.

 

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Good luck mate. Keep us posted. This will be a very interesting topic. R1200R's are not too common on UK roads and even the local BMW club raised a few eyebrows when I rolled up on mine.
 

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I have always found you to be a fairly reasonable fellow Lawrence. Well, except for the fact that you don't think of your beloved Montego blue Roadster as a "SHE" ,but we'll overlook that point. I think the Trophy fairing install with photos would be a fine addition to the Forum. Look forward to seeing it.
I trust your editing discretion will be reasonable.
Encourage all other members to take pix and post photos their farkles & accessories when you personalize your Roadster.
 

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The fairing is now with the painter and I won't get it back until the end of the first week in July (about ten days time), but I can at least partially answer this one now, I think, having already done a sort-of pre-assembly when the kit arrived.
Thanks a lot for this.

Looking forward to the installation pics and why not... to an installation video if that is possible. youtube is our friend here. :001_rolleyes:

At least for me being able to install it on my own even once a year for a long trip and then remove it is a great motive to get this. Wind is unbearable beyond 120 klm/h.
 

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Lawrence of S:

Unless I am not understanding what you are saying then . . .

why don't you ask/pay for another set of signal light brackets. One to leave attached to your fairing, and the other to mount on your bike. It would make removal/re-installation much easier.

bob
 

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Discussion Starter #11
why don't you ask/pay for another set of signal light brackets. One to leave attached to your fairing, and the other to mount on your bike. It would make removal/re-installation much easier.
bob
All things are possible, bob, and there is usually more than one way to skin the cat! BUT, having looked at this pretty carefully, I don't think it would be feasible, unless you were to locate the 'spare' or extra pair of indicators elsewhere on the front of the bike. The existing ones cannot be left in situ as the new bracket that's part of the Wunderlich kit would foul it when assembly time came. There would also be the matter of duplicating the wiring on each side to the new 'spare' indicators.

Finally, I don't think I'd want to sell my first-born to pay for a new pair of BMW indicators!

However, all things, etc.... you make up you mind when you view my notes and pix!

Lawrence of Suburbia

Outer Brisbane, SE Queensland, Australia

2012 R1200R: Montego Blue with ABS, ESA, RDC, OBC, Puig rear hugger, Stebel Magnum horn, Grip Puppies, ss oil-cooler guard, Abdeckring installed, Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing.
 

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LofS, Am anxious to see your new project. Completion is near. :drool:
Granted, a new set of L&R regular bulb type front turn indicators would be some expense.Aftermarket LEDs sometimes run the risk of a fault code.
FYI:
BMW OEM LED front turn signals are $45 each.
Comes with wiring and connectors installed.
MAX BMW Motorcycles - BMW Parts & Technical Diagrams - R1200R 10+ (K27)
They are Plug & Play.

Beemer Boneyard often has excellent condition used OEM front turn signal sets (standard bulb type) listed for $50-$75.
Lots of guys switched over to the LEDs.
LIGHTING & RADIO/SPEAKER PARTS

BTW, BMW OEM LED ATC ABS ETC GPS OBC CAT TPMS DOHC ...
Geez, does BMW have way too many acronyms, or am I just old and grumpy? Does anyone beside me have trouble remembering what they all mean? I have to stop and think sometimes. End of rant. I feel better.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Fitting the Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing and screen 2.0

Buying on-line from Nippy Norman’s (UK) avoided the 20% VAT (sales tax) for non-EU residents: the saving helped appreciably and more than paid for the spray-painting. But still, IMHO, far too costly for what it is.

Wunderlich does not yet produce the Trophy fairing in 2013 colours, so I specified Biarritz Blue – very similar to my bike’s Montego Blue paintwork – so that if the repainted fairing suffers any damage the almost-matching underlying coat will help to camouflage it.

My local motorbike painter did an excellent job of spray-painting the fairing – I left with him one of the under-seat side panels from the bike, which he used to check colour-matching, and even to my ultra-fussy eyes it near-100%.

The fairing and screen are both very nicely made and finished. The fittings are also excellent and comprehensive. Installation instructions, however, are a different matter, sadly…

The Trophy fittings kit mainly comprises two pairs of very nicely-finished silver-anodized laser-cut aluminium (I’m guessing) brackets, looking aircraft-like in design and finish. One pair is triangular in shape (support for the upper part of the fairing), the other pair roughly ‘L’ shaped (supporting the lower part). Two other small ‘U’ shaped brackets are also included to allow the front LED indicators to be moved outwards.

An assortment of small nuts, bolts, screws, washers, spacers, and bushes completes the package, along with a length of clear pre-slit plastic snap-on edge guard to run around the edge of the fairing, if wanted. All fastenings are Allen heads, and on final assembly all threads were given a touch of Loctite for extra security.

The steps of the process are as broadly follows after having mounted the brackets onto the inside of the fairing:

(1) remove OE screen (if fitted)
(2) remove cowl above headlight – it’s a push-fit into rubber grommets so a gentle upwards wiggle just using fingertips does it
(3) remove headlight – place a thick towel on top of the front guard to hold/ protect headlight
(4) undo 2 x screws securing OE screen bracket (if fitted) inside/underneath headlight recess, and 2 x screws on outer/ rear ends of screen bracket
(5) snip 3 x zip-ties securing (a) indicator wires and (b) 2 x small junction plugs, one each side
(6) remove indicators from mounting points and pull out ends of wires from junction plugs
(7) pull out wires to extend length by about 5cm (2”)
(8) re-fit headlight, not forgetting to realign its beam afterwards
(9) attach screen to fairing – very important, this: proceed with fitting fairing via pre-attached brackets, after re-securing wiring and plugs with new zip-ties: thread indicator wires through the ‘U” bracket keyholes and headlight bracket: re-attach indicators on ‘U” brackets outboard of original locations: and replace cowl after checking indicators’ operation
(10) pour and consume large very cold beer, e.g. Grolsch.

Re-zipping the wires and the two under-cowl junction plugs is only a few words, but it was time-consuming and extremely fiddly, as I was working blind and entirely by touch, but I now feel competent to take on brain surgery!

The new brackets are attached to the fairing before assembly onto the bike is started. The two pairs of brackets – one pair for each side – simply screw onto the fairing via a total of eight (8) threaded inserts that are moulded into its inner surface.

The upper brackets then screw onto the bike via the two (2) x external threaded holes left when the OE screen’s supporting bracket is removed.

The lower brackets screw (firstly) into the new small “U” shaped brackets then secondly (into) the two (2) x threaded holes revealed when the front LED indicators are relocated outwards on these “U” brackets. For clarification (I hope!) one of my pix shows the arrangement of the brackets on the lhs of the bike, but without the fairing being there – again, the brackets are fitted to the fairing before installation onto the bike***.

This rather clever use of existing fastening points (a) makes it relatively easy to fit and align the fairing and (b) removes any need for makeshift clamps or other fastenings.

The instructions were very poorly worded and incomplete, and the illustrations not all that helpful, both deficiencies totally out of kilter with the excellent quality of the package’s hardware.

I followed some useful hints from this Forum, and especially from <las>: thanks, all. Following his lead I attached the screen to the fairing before fitting it to the bike, as he’d indicated this made final assembly easier. It certainly did, as the fairing is pulled into shape to better align the eight (8) fastening holes in the screen this way. I’ll paint the screen fastening screw-heads in matching blue later.

I worked through it, though, and took the trouble to do a pre-assembly of the brackets onto the fairing - before it was painted – to ensure that everything would work. This took about 30 minutes, working carefully and slowly so as not to damage the fairing, strip threads, or whatever.

Once this trial assembly was done it was easy enough to see how the final fitting onto the bike would work, much of it being intuitive.

A deal of patience and a fair bit of head-scratching and ‘fiddling’ were needed at times, especially when it came to de-coupling the indicator junction plugs under the cowl to allow the wires to be threaded outboard to the new location of the indicators, but I got there! Allow at least a couple of hours for a first-timer.

Finally, after a bit of alignment of everything the all-important ‘how does it work’ road test was pretty satisfying.

Although I’ve added the fairing largely for cosmetic reasons rather than wind protection, it does seem to smooth out the blast appreciably, directing the breeze largely onto my upper body (I’m 5’9” and-a-bit). It is certainly more effective than the tiny OE Sport Screen - and it looks good!

I’ve always been a fan of naked bikes, so this – together with the PUIG rear hugger – is as far as I’d want to go in adding anything to compromise the unclad look of the R, but I do think that Wunderlich’s Trophy fairing adds a certain amount of style as well as moderately improved wind-protection on the bike. For what it is the cost is ridiculous, but what’s a girl to do…?

Well recommended! Pix attached – if any reader would like others here, or more info, I’ll try to oblige. Or PM me…

Pix attached(if the system will accept them: having difficulties!!! ) (Will try again later - meantime, enjoy the words!)

· inside fairing shows threaded inserts for screws to brackets
· brackets attached (2 pix)
· hrdware kit
· underneath cowl shows junction plugs L and R, and 4 x securing rubber fastening grommets
· exploded or X-ray view of brackets without fairing attached (refer *** above)
· brackets blend-in nicely with the R1200 R style
· view of cockpit
· finally installed on the bike – colour of fairing paintwork is a better match than these pix suggest!

Lawrence of Suburbia

Outer Brisbane, SE Queensland, Australia

2012 R1200R: Montego Blue with ABS, ESA, RDC, OBC, Puig rear hugger, Stebel Magnum horn, Grip Puppies, ss oil-cooler guard, Abdeckring installed, Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing.


 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
It's the middle of the night - tho' my doggie doesn't seem to know! - and this inability to post pix is bugging me - so here's another try!

Sleepless in Brisbane.

L of S


NOPE - NEED HELP! I have ten (10) pix to delight you all, each about 500 KB.
 

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BMW OEM LED front turn signals are $45 each.
Comes with wiring and connectors installed.
MAX BMW Motorcycles - BMW Parts & Technical Diagrams - R1200R 10+ (K27)
Adding up the lens (US$12), reflector ($24), bulb ($3), and housing ($20) for the amber turn signal is more like $60 each. Or you can do what I did: my bike had white lights in the back, and I wanted ambers. I bought cheep Chinese copies at $6 per pair: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItemVersion&item=220683675139&view=all&tid=1207138423012
They're plug-and-play, decent quality, a little narrower than the fronts (and wider than the rears), but otherwise indistinguishable from OEM.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I think that some of these points and discussions about extra indicator lights are a bit of a mis-cue, chaps! It was Neikt (post #5 here) who mooted the possibility of taking the fairing off from time to time - then came a suggestion of additional lights to make this unnecessary, or whatever - I never did quite follow this line of reasoning!

IMHO - Neikt - or anyone else - would be mad to contemplate taking the Trophy fairing off with any frequency - it's a time-consuming and tricky job, and I cannot see the benefit. If it's fitted - leave well alone!

And BTW - Sat morning July 6th - I still cannot post pix. Going to try another avenue later - I'm well aware that without pix much of my installation words is somewhat wasted! Sorry!

L of S
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Try one for size!

Nervous breakdown time!

L of S

I may have to add them one at a time over a period of days - only nine (9) to go! Aaarrggggghhhhh!
 

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Fitting the Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing and screen 2.0

Buying on-line from Nippy Norman’s (UK) avoided the 20% VAT (sales tax) for non-EU residents: the saving helped appreciably and more than paid for the spray-painting. But still, IMHO, far too costly for what it is.

Wunderlich does not yet produce the Trophy fairing in 2013 colours, so I specified Biarritz Blue – very similar to my bike’s Montego Blue paintwork – so that if the repainted fairing suffers any damage the almost-matching underlying coat will help to camouflage it.

My local motorbike painter did an excellent job of spray-painting the fairing – I left with him one of the under-seat side panels from the bike, which he used to check colour-matching, and even to my ultra-fussy eyes it near-100%.

The fairing and screen are both very nicely made and finished. The fittings are also excellent and comprehensive. Installation instructions, however, are a different matter, sadly…

The Trophy fittings kit mainly comprises two pairs of very nicely-finished silver-anodized laser-cut aluminium (I’m guessing) brackets, looking aircraft-like in design and finish. One pair is triangular in shape (support for the upper part of the fairing), the other pair roughly ‘L’ shaped (supporting the lower part). Two other small ‘U’ shaped brackets are also included to allow the front LED indicators to be moved outwards.

An assortment of small nuts, bolts, screws, washers, spacers, and bushes completes the package, along with a length of clear pre-slit plastic snap-on edge guard to run around the edge of the fairing, if wanted. All fastenings are Allen heads, and on final assembly all threads were given a touch of Loctite for extra security.

The steps of the process are as broadly follows after having mounted the brackets onto the inside of the fairing:

(1) remove OE screen (if fitted)
(2) remove cowl above headlight – it’s a push-fit into rubber grommets so a gentle upwards wiggle just using fingertips does it
(3) remove headlight – place a thick towel on top of the front guard to hold/ protect headlight
(4) undo 2 x screws securing OE screen bracket (if fitted) inside/underneath headlight recess, and 2 x screws on outer/ rear ends of screen bracket
(5) snip 3 x zip-ties securing (a) indicator wires and (b) 2 x small junction plugs, one each side
(6) remove indicators from mounting points and pull out ends of wires from junction plugs
(7) pull out wires to extend length by about 5cm (2”)
(8) re-fit headlight, not forgetting to realign its beam afterwards
(9) attach screen to fairing – very important, this: proceed with fitting fairing via pre-attached brackets, after re-securing wiring and plugs with new zip-ties: thread indicator wires through the ‘U” bracket keyholes and headlight bracket: re-attach indicators on ‘U” brackets outboard of original locations: and replace cowl after checking indicators’ operation
(10) pour and consume large very cold beer, e.g. Grolsch.

Re-zipping the wires and the two under-cowl junction plugs is only a few words, but it was time-consuming and extremely fiddly, as I was working blind and entirely by touch, but I now feel competent to take on brain surgery!

The new brackets are attached to the fairing before assembly onto the bike is started. The two pairs of brackets – one pair for each side – simply screw onto the fairing via a total of eight (8) threaded inserts that are moulded into its inner surface.

The upper brackets then screw onto the bike via the two (2) x external threaded holes left when the OE screen’s supporting bracket is removed.

The lower brackets screw (firstly) into the new small “U” shaped brackets then secondly (into) the two (2) x threaded holes revealed when the front LED indicators are relocated outwards on these “U” brackets. For clarification (I hope!) one of my pix shows the arrangement of the brackets on the lhs of the bike, but without the fairing being there – again, the brackets are fitted to the fairing before installation onto the bike***.

This rather clever use of existing fastening points (a) makes it relatively easy to fit and align the fairing and (b) removes any need for makeshift clamps or other fastenings.

The instructions were very poorly worded and incomplete, and the illustrations not all that helpful, both deficiencies totally out of kilter with the excellent quality of the package’s hardware.

I followed some useful hints from this Forum, and especially from <las>: thanks, all. Following his lead I attached the screen to the fairing before fitting it to the bike, as he’d indicated this made final assembly easier. It certainly did, as the fairing is pulled into shape to better align the eight (8) fastening holes in the screen this way. I’ll paint the screen fastening screw-heads in matching blue later.

I worked through it, though, and took the trouble to do a pre-assembly of the brackets onto the fairing - before it was painted – to ensure that everything would work. This took about 30 minutes, working carefully and slowly so as not to damage the fairing, strip threads, or whatever.

Once this trial assembly was done it was easy enough to see how the final fitting onto the bike would work, much of it being intuitive.

A deal of patience and a fair bit of head-scratching and ‘fiddling’ were needed at times, especially when it came to de-coupling the indicator junction plugs under the cowl to allow the wires to be threaded outboard to the new location of the indicators, but I got there! Allow at least a couple of hours for a first-timer.

Finally, after a bit of alignment of everything the all-important ‘how does it work’ road test was pretty satisfying.

Although I’ve added the fairing largely for cosmetic reasons rather than wind protection, it does seem to smooth out the blast appreciably, directing the breeze largely onto my upper body (I’m 5’9” and-a-bit). It is certainly more effective than the tiny OE Sport Screen - and it looks good!

I’ve always been a fan of naked bikes, so this – together with the PUIG rear hugger – is as far as I’d want to go in adding anything to compromise the unclad look of the R, but I do think that Wunderlich’s Trophy fairing adds a certain amount of style as well as moderately improved wind-protection on the bike. For what it is the cost is ridiculous, but what’s a girl to do…?

Well recommended! Pix attached – if any reader would like others here, or more info, I’ll try to oblige. Or PM me…

Pix attached(if the system will accept them: having difficulties!!! ) (Will try again later - meantime, enjoy the words!)

· inside fairing shows threaded inserts for screws to brackets
· brackets attached (2 pix)
· hrdware kit
· underneath cowl shows junction plugs L and R, and 4 x securing rubber fastening grommets
· exploded or X-ray view of brackets without fairing attached (refer *** above)
· brackets blend-in nicely with the R1200 R style
· view of cockpit
· finally installed on the bike – colour of fairing paintwork is a better match than these pix suggest!

Lawrence of Suburbia

Outer Brisbane, SE Queensland, Australia

2012 R1200R: Montego Blue with ABS, ESA, RDC, OBC, Puig rear hugger, Stebel Magnum horn, Grip Puppies, ss oil-cooler guard, Abdeckring installed, Wunderlich ‘Trophy’ fairing.



Perfect instructions,
Although I don't personally like the fairing, I think our bikes look better all naked.

Nice riding boots btw, I'm sure your feet are dry.
 

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Discussion Starter #19

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
try again...
 
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