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Anyone have any good "rules of thumb" or tips when it comes to manually adjusting the suspension on my '12 r1200r? I'm worried about making things uneven. Or is it just something I'll have to feel my way through? :confused: I wish I had the ESA, but at the same time, like my dealer pointed out, once I've set it I don't really need to mess with it too much. So it seems a bit steep to spring for now.
 

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There is no adjustment on the stock front suspension. The rear has an adjustment for preload under the seat and damping by screw at the case of the shock. The preload setting "normal" presumes a single rider weighing 187 lbs with no luggage. The factory damping is set for this. If you weigh/carry more or less adjust the preload one bar at a time in the appropriate direction and the damping one complete (360degree) turn at a time in the same direction. If you adjust one, you should adjust the other at the same rate. Experiment until you find what works for you. If you keep track of what you did- how many bars/turns you move off normal, you can always get back to the factory setting.
 

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If you weigh/carry more or less adjust the preload one bar at a time in the appropriate direction and the damping one complete (360degree) turn at a time in the same direction.

Good to know. When I was looking at the screw the other day the arrows on it looked like H<-->S, so I had no idea what direction they actually meant. I assumed it would be the same as the preload.
 

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I originally had the same issue. Great bike- hook blur manual and markings. I have the shop manual on cd- I figured out the Rubic's cube faster than I can figure out most of its diagrams. I hear tell that understanding it is one of the MENSA challenges!
 

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H= Hard, for sportier riding
S= Soft.............

I played with it in several riding conditions, and honestly, I find right on the middle to be just ok, for all.
 

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Keep in mind that conventional suspension wisdom is: if you adjust preload, you should adjust damping at the same rate and vice versa. As I happen to weigh 187 lbs, more or less, I also find the middle setting to be just fine- but my preload setting is also in the middle- at "Normal". When I add bags and fill them or go two up, I adjust the preload a couple of bars toward Hard and adjust damping the same amount of tuns of the screw as the number of bars of preload that I added. This seems to give me the closest dude to before the added weight.
 

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Interesting read...and im not sure if the above posts are entirely correct in their understanding of dampening and preload.
My understanding and I reckon its right, is you adjust the dampening for a more harder or softer ride. I back off (turn my dampening screw anti clockwise) for a less harsh ride...meaning it speeds up the rebound.... lets the end and rear wheel move up and down quicker of bumpy undulations...which you find in New Zealand roads.
I adjust my preload for a entirely different reason and its is separate to the dampening so by adjusting the dampening you don't then need to adjust the preload.
Preload is only for adjusting the back end up and down to take into account extra weight of luggage and carrying two people.
I may also adjust mine to tip my weight forward a bit more onto the bars.
By adjusting it a little higher may mean you are on your tippy toes a bit more.
 

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SportRider magazine has a great article on suspensions, what all the terms mean, common problems, and how to set up your suspension. See here.

I weigh about 155 pounds and typically ride solo with little or no luggage, and I like a sportier ride. I have found that adding 1 full turn of rear preload (towards stiffer) and 0 to 1/4 turn of damping work well for street riding.

I have now done 3 track days with my 2013 R12R. At the first, at Road Atlanta, I had a suspension tuner measure my static sag and recommend adjustments. Since the front on our bikes is non-adjustable, he didn't adjust the rear as much as he would have otherwise. He set the rear preload really high, with only 3 lines showing. He added a full turn of damping (towards H). The bike felt MUCH more planted on the track. However, keep in mind that I was running tire pressures for the track (31 front, 30 rear, cold). These suspension settings felt awful on the street.

I'm seriously considering upgrading the suspension with Wilbers components, courtesy of Ted Porter's Beemer Shop. I had a long conversation with him and he asserts that it's possible to get much sportier performance without sacrificing comfort.
 

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This link may have been suggested in earlier dialog...not all is applicable, but almost all is interesting: Suspension Setup
 

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This was my last experience with suspension on my 2012.

I was going on a long trip. I packed all my stuff and stood on the scale with saddle bags in hands. Total weight 260 lbs me and my gear. I also had a tent, sleeping bag and bedroll attached to the rear rack so I figured another 30 lbs.

My rear sag is usually set at 45mm. I adjusted the preload to the middle bar so the bike was level again with all the gear loaded and me on it. I could tell by the mirrors and where the headlight was pointing. This should make the bike handle similar to when its unloaded. Its sits the same. No further changes were made for the trip.

Next I was heading down the slab for the first day. I wanted a nice smooth ride, trying to dial out the expansion joints. I set the rear damping to 2 turns out from H. Ride was good. I stop every hour when traveling so one stop I went to 3 turns out which would be minimal rebound damping. The bike went up and down with every bump. Kinda made me sea sick. Back to 2 turns out for that part of the ride. Later in the day when I was going through Cleavland the bike was a little hard to handle. road was rougher, traffic was busy and I was not liking it. SO I turned the rebound in 1/2 more turn. This left me at 1.5 turns out or about the middle. Things were better. I had more control of the bike and was not getting the bump twice. Still getting a pretty smooth ride.

Next was some riding in the upper peninsula of Michigan. I turned the damping in to 1/2 turn out from H. Almost all the rebound damping it has. Handling was good even though I had all my crap strapped on the back and saddle bags full. Twisties and bumps were good. No bouncing or wallowing in the corners.

That night I set up camp. Everything was off the bike. I went to fetch a steak for dinner. Bike was bucking me like crazy. I got to feel all the bumps, ride was rough. I was still at the setting for twisty roads and loaded bike. I just put up with it, I was only going to the store.

I rode 2,000 miles in 7 days. Too much on the slab (about 1/2), but the ride was good no matter what i was doing.

Each has their own taste to suspension.

Preload, makes bike level. Not much to change once its there. Keeping the front and rear balanced helps the bike handle best it can.

Rebound makes for a stiffer or softer ride.
The rear tire must follow the contour of the road, so rebound has to be adjusted to conditions you are riding.

Don's page is good.
The sport bike page is also good.
Read all you can and make adjustments to see what they do to the bike.
In the end, solo riding factory settings are pretty good.

David
 

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Is Hard clockwise or anti-clockwise?
Clockwise on spring preload increases preload, clockwise on damping adjuster increases damping.
 

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Keep in mind that conventional suspension wisdom is: if you adjust preload, you should adjust damping at the same rate and vice versa. As I happen to weigh 187 lbs, more or less, I also find the middle setting to be just fine- but my preload setting is also in the middle- at "Normal". When I add bags and fill them or go two up, I adjust the preload a couple of bars toward Hard and adjust damping the same amount of tuns of the screw as the number of bars of preload that I added. This seems to give me the closest dude to before the added weight.
Which direction do you turn the screw for Hard?
Clockwise on spring preload increases preload, clockwise on damping adjuster increases damping.
Thank you.
 

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Anyone have any good "rules of thumb" or tips when it comes to manually adjusting the suspension on my '12 r1200r? I'm worried about making things uneven. Or is it just something I'll have to feel my way through? :confused: I wish I had the ESA, but at the same time, like my dealer pointed out, once I've set it I don't really need to mess with it too much. So it seems a bit steep to spring for now.
Dave,
I have a brand new in box
That I paid almost $1500.00 for. I ended up sellling my 2012 Classic, and he was taller than I was, so he didn't want them. If you have an interest, let me know, I'll send you more info. These can be adjusted in multiple different settings, rather than the 4 you get with factory ESA. I was really trying to get another 1.5 inches lower, but as Ted Porter of the Beemer Shop told me, This Suspension Kit comes with Front and Rear Shocks, Wilbers Remote Hydraulic Spring Preload plus everything needed to mount them. Again, all the stock suspension parts can be removed and saved so if you sell the bike, the new owner can decided what he wants to use. The stock ESA comes with 4 settings, using temperature as an analogy, you get Hot, Warmer, Warm and Cold. With this kit, it gives you the capability of changing the 'heat' almost infinitely, and once you find the settings you prefer for different loads and roads, you just set it and go. Again, still in the box, never used. I ended up buying a 2016 R1200R so these don't fit. Jack - 516-281-4560
 
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