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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

(Again, in the hope I am not duplicating an already-existing thread on this topic)
I thought it might be worth to share the idea of considering a modular/flip-up helmet -
I.e. while very popular among e.g. GS-riders (and with raving reviews),
If I am not mistaken modular/flip-up helmets are far less popular among other riders -
And I would therefore like to warmly recommend to consider them/give them a try.

I live in GA-USA with summers with lots of > 90F/32C and high humidity days,
And while till now only worn full face helmets (latest being Shoei X-14),
Just got a Schuberth C4-Pro few weeks ago, and really like it:
I.e. (not only its external dimensions and weight feel much smaller/lighter than my ex Shoei X-14, and thus less wind facing surface and easier to e.g. turn head/look aside/back, but more importantly)
The ability to lift the front in e.g. red traffic lights makes a huge a difference, as one is bathing in sweat/hot-soup-like-weather while waiting for the green light,
And the combined heat+humidity nightmare suddenly feels much less overwhelming.

And further - given the C4-Pro in particular is certified to be used/ridden in open/flipped-up-mode too,
I find myself doing so during in-city rides too (internal visor still protects one's eyes),
and love it.

Warmly recommend to give it a thought/try :)

P.s.
To anyone, who is debating between Shoei and Schuberth,
I would warmly recommend to watch this very informative and useful 'Shoei Neotec 2 vs Schuberth C3 Pro Modular Motorcycle Helmets' review.
 

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Very popular with many BMW and touring riders have had 2 in the last 8 years. I have a BMW system 7 which is basically a Schuberth.

Will on occasion flip it open at low speeds and nice to be able to go into a fuel station to get drinks without removing your helmet.

I like the integrated sun visor and was the initial reason for getting a modular before full face helmets started including sun visors.
 

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Now that I am down to one fully functioning eye, I’ve given up on shorties and open face helmets, which I used for decades, and will use only full face. Modular seems cool but I still went with a full for my last new helmet. Modular helmets may be safer than open face but they aren’t Snell rated. It amounts to a personal choice. Flipping them up while riding defeats their purpose.
 

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Currently using a BMW System 7 as well, open on hot city driving and pumping gas..

Sun visor its accurate and doesn’t distort vision like some others.

Doesn’t rattle ur head on high speed.


Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk
 

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I’ve been using a System 6/7(?) helmet for years will always stay with a modular, having previously had full face.

As mentioned, it’s so handy being able to leave it on when popping into shop (some servos will insist you remove it - usually those that are prone to hold-ups). It’s much easier to communicate with others by flipping the front. At the lights I’ll occasionally let a driver know a brake light bulb is out, and it’s easier/quicker to get through. I think the mic boom helps - their initial impression may be that I’m a policeman. 😄

My next helmet may well be an AGV Sport Modular. The latest version of the BMW System helmet seems to have more soft padding which made the fit less than ideal for me. The AGV is full carbon fibre and hence very light, and the fit seems to suit me.
 

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The AGV sport modular seemed like a great idea - great fit around the head, well-made etc and I was going to get an amazing deal on a carbon version, until I tried it on at the store more thoughtfully, paying more attention to the strap after reading some online reviews.

YMMV of course, and I think it depends very much on body build, but in my case I found the strap to dig into my throat quite objectionably. An uncharitable person might suggest that this is connected to being 25# overweight, and my guess is that a slimmer person would have less of an issue. The friend who recommended one in the first place is rail thin, and has no issues.

Not trying to put you off, as I thought it was a truly excellent helmet which I would have bought in a heartbeat but for the strap. If that part isn't an issue, I expect you'd be delighted with it.

JtL
 

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I definitely agree, but a lot of it comes down to personal choice and acceptance of risk. Modular/flip-up helmets are definitely great and have improved a lot since they first started to appear on the market. I've ridden with a modular for several years, currently riding with a Nolan N-104 (that replaced my much-loved N-103) and very happy with it.

However, there's no question they aren't as safe as a full-face. The hinges and latch mechanism are a weak point that doesn't exist with a true full-face so there's a chance if you come off your bike and strike the face of the helmet the entire chin area might come off. Safer than an open-face, but not as safe as a proper full-face... but again it comes down to acceptance of risk. From my perspective, I accept a certain amount of risk EVERY time I ride. I am willing to accept the risk for the convenience of a flip-up; for example while on a long ride I usually carry a couple of bottles of water on the bike. It's nice to be able to pull over by the side of the road and drink something without having to take my helmet off. Same with going into a gas station. YMMV though :)
 

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With the Shark Spartan full face I use, if it is really hot out and I'm not going much more than say 40 mph, I flip the visor up and use the internal sun visor for eye protection against bugs etc.. Flows a lot of air onto the face and you've still got chin/jaw protection. Now I don't know how well the sun visor would handle a rock strike, so I suspect that's my risk area.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
.... Modular helmets may be safer than open face but they aren’t Snell rated. ...
.... Modular/flip-up helmets are definitely great ... However, there's no question they aren't as safe as a full-face. ...
AFAIK some of the police forces around the world use modular helmets as e.g. noted in this Youtube review,
And thus arguably -
If it is good/safe enough for such an organization given its high standards and demands (safety/high millage/comfort/reliability/usability/etc),
And good enough furthermore to justify their higher (than many other, very good, full face helmets) purchase cost -
It is good enough for everyone else.
 

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AFAIK some of the police forces around the world use modular helmets as e.g. noted in this Youtube review,
And thus arguably -
If it is good/safe enough for such an organization given its high standards and demands (safety/high millage/comfort/reliability/usability/etc),
And good enough furthermore to justify their higher (than many other, very good, full face helmets) purchase cost -
It is good enough for everyone else.
Until you consider many US police forces wearing open face helmets and I've seen them wearing short sleeve shirts. Trained or not, GFL going down in that get up!

JtL
 

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However, there's no question they aren't as safe as a full-face. The hinges and latch mechanism are a weak point that doesn't exist with a true full-face so there's a chance if you come off your bike and strike the face of the helmet the entire chin area might come off. Safer than an open-face, but not as safe as a proper full-face..
There's actually less correlation between safety, type and price of helmets than one usually assumes, especially if you take the helmet safety as a whole, not one specific aspect of it.

If you check out the SHARP ratings, (1-5 stars, 5 stars being the best) you will find 6 modular helmets with 5-star rating. The latches on one of them held in all tests. The latches on the one I'm currently wearing, Caberg Konda, failed in 3% of tests. Apart from this they provide high level of protection. The prices for the cheapest modular 5-star helmet is 90 GBP, the most expensive is the now discontinued BMW System 5 at 255 GBP.

In contrast, the cheapest Schuberth full-face helmet R1 costs 320 GBP and only has 2 stars. Even their priciest full-face SR1 for 500 GBP only has 4 stars.

I'm not saying that Schuberth, Shoei,... do not offer other advantages, such as comfort, lower noise levels,... but if we're talking about safely, neither the price nor the helmet type have much of an effect on the rating, instead it's down to details of a specific helmet.
 

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That’s a very broad generalisation. The UK has a helmet rating system that allows a pretty informed judgement when assessing helmet safety.
Looks like a good site but it appears you need to look at the info for the helmet instead of comparing the number of stars.
The Shoie Neotch 2 has four stars and the Schuberth C4 has three stars.
The Schuberth has slightly better impact results and the latch is 100% compared to the Shoie 70%.

The C4 that was sold in the US is a little different than the Europe C4. I wonder is the US C4 would rate the same.
 

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Looks like a good site but it appears you need to look at the info for the helmet instead of comparing the number of stars.
The Shoie Neotch 2 has four stars and the Schuberth C4 has three stars.
The Schuberth has slightly better impact results and the latch is 100% compared to the Shoie 70%.

The C4 that was sold in the US is a little different than the Europe C4. I wonder is the US C4 would rate the same.
I have spoken about the Sharp helmet rating system to a number of people and the consensus is that it’s fine for moped and scooter riders but meaningless for motorcyclists as the helmets are tested in an 18mph collision, which favours ‘spongy’ lids that are nice and cushioning in a low speed crash, but potentially damn all use in a faster accident.


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I’ve never heard of any incidences of modular helmet failures in accidents. I’m onto my second Shoei Neotec & love them. As a glasses wearer I find them easier to use. I like not having to remove them at most servo’s & when conversing with other road users. Oh yeah.. I NEVER ride with it open as that defeats the purpose of a full face design.
Stricko
 

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And let's give the flick to - Where did You go on your Roadster today?
I wonder whether if your head hits a solid, immovable object at much over that speed you're toast anyway, whatever helmet you're wearing. Just sayin' ...

There's an interesting discussion here.
 

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When flip front helmets are good enough for the track then they will be good enough for me. ;)
 

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When flip front helmets are good enough for the track then they will be good enough for me. ;)
Do you also wear airbag leathers and full race boots and gloves? Every ride is a risk (as is choosing to get out of bed in the morning) – it's a matter of how big a risk you are prepared to take and what mitigating steps you take. 😉
 
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