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Some good info Dr Dave, thanks for sharing.
 

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Had a similar problem riding my K100RT. Turned out to be Carpel Tunnel.
Sponge grips help but discovered that riding a R1200RT with slightly higher bars virtually eliminated the problem.
I bought a set of risers from a company called 'Red Luna Racing' in the USA via eBay.
Appear to be good quality and not expensive. £30 including p&p to the UK. $28.95 in the States. Arrived quickly, too.
 

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Hi All,
I'm new to the forum so hello! I read the replies and thought I might be able to help with some personal experiences and a revelation I had. I had a Ducati monster which has similar ergos as the R1200. My hands used to go numb every time I rode. I tried bar risers, grips nothing helped. Then I discovered what was really causing the numbness and the numbness never came back.
I'll explain what the cause is and what to do about it. First, a demo: reach out for something and take note of what your elbow does. It rises, abducting from the body. it's a very natural motion. When we reach out for the bars our elbows do the same thing and move away from our body. This position seems to compress the nerve going to the arm/hands resulting in numb hands. The solution is to keep your elbows tucked into your sides as much as you can. The result is no numb hands. It's also a more aerodynamic position as well. Try it I think you'll see it works.

Regards Doc
 

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You could try doing some wrist, arm and shoulder exercises and stretches. Get some of those cheap resistance bands and look up some exercises on youtube. This is probably your cheapest solution and even if it doesent fix the numbness, you have stronger arms and shoulders ;).
 

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Try it I think you'll see it works. Doc

Thanks for this little tip, Doc - I'll give it a try when next out on my F800 GT.

L of S
 

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Risers

A couple of year ago I went from a Triumph America (cruiser) to a BMW F800 ST and the numbness problem arose. I added 1: up and back risers (Twisted Throttle) and the issue is gone. It could be the beginning of carpal tunnel issues but if you only have pain on this bike, I'd look into the risers which alter your forward position and release the pressure. Good luck.
 

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From time to time, I would get the numb hand thing to. The reasons why may differ from one person to the next, so I have tried many things. First make sure the boxer is in a good state of tune, a good valve adjustment and throttle body sync can tame a lot of vibration. On my bike, I have added one inch bar risers, the heavy version of throttlemeister throttle lock(weight to calm vibes and a lock to rest my hand). I have even filled the handle bars with sand to further change the vibe frequency. I also use a gel padded glove. For the most part I don't numb hands that often any more.
 

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Couple of things.
It could be carpal tunnel syndrome but without an exam it can be suspected, but not confirmed.
It could be vascular, ie impeding blood flow to the fingers-> numbness. The grips on the r12 are thin and with gloves on and your hand curled, arteries to the fingers can be compressed leading to numbness. If this is happening the feeling will return quickly when your fingers are outstretched and blood supply returns; likely faster than feeling returning after median nerve compression from carpal tunnel. Anything to make the grips fatter will help this though maybe not completely (Grip puppies). I had this flavor of numbness and the grip puppies helped big time so that it is not an issue anymore.
There is another "tunnel" in the wrist thrrough which the ulnar nerve passes. It too can be compressed and it too sometimes need surgical release. The ulnar nerve provides sensation to the little and the little finger half of the ring finger. It also provide innervation to the muscles in the palm of the hand.
The radial nerve is on the thumb side and is rarely compressed.
So, with all that said, someone said ergonomics. Obviously if pressure on whatever is causing this is removed, the symptoms would likely improve.

I would try the grip puppies, but also"rolling" the bars forward or rearward, by loosening the retaining clamps on the triple tree and trying different positions. You won't have to roll them much to tell and it is something you can try on a ride. Just remember to retighten. Doing this changes the ergos a bunch and may address the problem.

John
 

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+1 on the Grip Puppies…. didn't totally eliminate the problem, but almost….. and I try to remember to relax my grip, especially in trying traffic or road conditions…...
 

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Dr. Strangelove: I would try the grip puppies, but also"rolling" the bars forward or rearward, by loosening the retaining clamps on the triple tree and trying different positions. You won't have to roll them much to tell and it is something you can try on a ride. Just remember to retighten. Doing this changes the ergos a bunch and may address the problem.

Just for safety sake, R1200R handlebar clamp bolt torque values are 24 Nm
and the bar end weights should be 19 Nm.


+1 What surflj said.

These puppies helped comfort for me. Grips alone are just a bit too small.
Relaxing grip helps in strong sidewinds also. The Boxer is a very steady bike, just relax and trust her more.
 

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Grip puppies are good/great and will reduce vibration, but they also add greater diameter to the handlebar grips, which some may like.

As for me, my hands like the diameter size and feel of stock O.E.M grips, and dont want to make them larger. Anyway, if one wants to futher reduce vibration, but keep the factory grips, just get aftermarket "heavier bar end weights".
 

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Been off forum a few days and getting caught up... surprised no one has mentioned a Crampbuster. Greatly reduces need to grip the throttle... (and the resultant tension on the muscles in your hand.) Just lay your hand on the rocker. Combined with Beemer Buddies I have no problems.
 

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Been off forum a few days and getting caught up... surprised no one has mentioned a Crampbuster. Greatly reduces need to grip the throttle... (and the resultant tension on the muscles in your hand.) Just lay your hand on the rocker. Combined with Beemer Buddies I have no problems.
The Crampbuster (along with the Grip Puppies) has been a big help for me.

This may be dumb question, but can you get a benefit out of putting a Crampbuster on the left hand grip also?
 

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The Crampbuster (along with the Grip Puppies) has been a big help for me.

This may be dumb question, but can you get a benefit out of putting a Crampbuster on the left hand grip also?

I do... but then I'm a little OCD about symmetry. :001_unsure:
 

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can you get a benefit out of putting a Crampbuster on the left hand grip also?
It would probably change the grip enough that it might help. Some bicycle grips have a "ledge" similar in positioning to the Crampbuster. The hands rest far flatter with them on the bicycle.
It may take pressure off the nerve, if that is what's causing the problem.

Word of warning though on the throttle side crampbuster (full disclosure: I use one). That twitchiness of the throttle at low speed, the all or none that sometimes happens at the most inopportune times, especially at low speed and esp in 1st gear and esp when the engine is cold, can be exacerbated by the crampbuster. It can "catch" the butt of your palm, and suddenely you are giving FAR more throttle than you intend and the bike can lurch.

Careful positioning of the crampbuster will ameliorate, but not fully prevent this from happening.
 

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grip buddies, bar risers and "just let go"

Same problem plus back pain. Been using the grip buddies for a few months with good but not sufficient results. I got the Touratech bar risers installed a week ago and went out for a long ride. The mechanic recommended taking some tools with me to play with the pitch angle of the bar and find the best spot. Amazing how different the feeling is with every tiny change.
Having said all that, the solution for me comes from "just letting go". Whenever I feel pain or numbness I just relax my palms, arms and upper body, I let my hands rest on the grips rather than hold on to them. I did a lot of Tai Chi practice in the past and it helps in understanding how to relax the upper body. The bike by the way prefers it that way, when I let it do its thing without me disturbing too much.
 

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