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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As a follow on to Pierre's post with problems with the Puig rear hugger, I figured it would be easier to put this in a new post.

I just received my new Puig rear hugger, and frankly, the quality control on the mounting bracket is terrible, which explains why Pierre's broke twice.

The idea is pretty simple-- the bottom/rear leg bolts solid to the caliper mount, and the forward mount bolts to the paralever attachement point. This mount has a bushing installed to allow for movement as the rear suspension travels up & down. Proper idea, horrible execution. They manufactured the mount thicker than the bushing, which when bolted up becomes solid making rotation impossible. Naturally, this puts stress on the weakest point--- the rear mounting bracket-- which is why it snaps eventually. Additionally, the brackets are not square to each other which adds further stress when the bolts are tightened.

After pressing the bushing out, I took a file and carefully reduced the thickness of the mount and squared it up to the other bracket as best as possible by eye, since I didn't have a jig. The lower mount needed to be filed as well. When bolting it up to the caliper and sighting the top mount, it was obvious things were still out of square. Since the bushing has the greatest leverage, it will square itself when tightened, putting the stress on the lower mount, which is another problem which caused the lower mount to snap on Pierre's since tightening the bolt on the mount when it isn't square puts it under tension.

I filed the lower mount so that when it is bolted up, the upper mount remains square to the paralever mount. The other problem is Puig's instructions say to put the bushing with the shoulder facing outwards. This, coupled with the bracket being too thick for the bearing, has the effect of essentially bolting the bracket up solid to the paralever, which prohibits any rotation and will only result in the bracket eventually breaking at the weakest point-- the lower bracket at the caliper.

To assemble the mount properly, I added a shim between the bracket and the caliper to allow the shouldered bushing to be inserted between the paralever arm and the fender bracket, opposite of their instructions, without any pinching when tightening the caliper bolt. Now, after applying some grease to the bearing/bushing, and bolting it up, the bracket is able to rotate freely on the bushing at the paralever mount, thereby preventing stress on the caliper mount.

Hopefully this makes the bracket function as intended! We'll see...
 

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Excellent thinking, action taken, and pix, Steve - thank you. I'm now on my third PUIG hugger (on three bikes!) and have had no issues, but before heading-off on a longish 3,600km or so trip in early Feb I think I'll follow your lead.



May I humbly suggest that you send this, with pix, to PUIG? Might avoid similar issues for future owners.

Thanks again!


L of S
 

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Absolutely BRILLIANT Steve, excellent way of thinking.

I have to agree with Lawrence, this should be forwarded to PUIG in order for them to hopefully be able to avoid future problems. Maybe they will send you some free huggers for ypur design efforts. :)

I was thinking abut buying a PUIG Hugger as I think it totally enhances the looks of the bike. However, when I started to read about all these problems, I decided to keep my money instead.
 

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Nice work Steve.

I often thought the cause of failure was the over tightening (i.e. not using torque wrench) on the pivot bolt - should be 56Nm. And 24Nm for rear bolt.

Anyway, seeing this thread had motivated me to spay dry lube around pivot bush, and I will consider your solution too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks for the kind words!

It's actually quite a simple mount, the rear bolt holds the fender tight and in place. The upper bolt in ordinary circumstances would do the same, however in this case, it happens to be the paralever mount to the rear axle housing which houses a bearing to allow for the rear housing to pivot within the paralever. Trying to use that as an anchor point for the fender bracket is ok as long as the motion isn't impeded. Essentially, the design is simply making the bolt for the paralever longer and then adding a bushing to allow the fender bracket to ride on the paralever bolt without binding the slight rotation needed for the rear end to move properly. Unfortunately, they have poor quality control in their castings where the dimensions are critical to allow for proper alignment of the brackets and the slight rotation needed for the paralever to prevent it from binding, and hence, breaking the bracket.
 

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Well thought out Steve! And great pictures to illustrate your fix. This is the kind of thread that makes this such a great forum, thank you! I have a Puig and I agree that the quality, especially at this price they get, leaves a lot to be desired. But it does look good and helps keep the rear shock clean. I haven't had any issues but after reading your post I'll take a closer look at it.

BTW, I'm down in La Jolla, maybe I'll see you around riding one of these days. Boy, that was some storm that rolled thru here a few hours ago, including a tornado watch! I'v lived here for 40+ years and have never seen a tornado warning before!
Hope all is ok up in Poway.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Just make sure the mount on the paralever bolt is free to move. That's the big problem that I can see with their poor quality bracket.

Yeah, more rain than we've seen in years, as everybody knows. I now have a 'disappearing edge' pool.... the water level is even with the deck! I also have a house out in Palm Springs, and I hear from friends a lot of rain is falling out there too. Kind of odd for the desert, but it happens!
 

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I was thinking abut buying a PUIG Hugger as I think it totally enhances the looks of the bike. However, when I started to read about all these problems, I decided to keep my money instead.
Don't be too discouraged to purchase this product. I will almost guarantee that their success rate far exceeds their failure rate.

For example, between LoS and myself, our proven miles with this product far exceed the double-unfortunate experience of Pierre.

My harshest critique is that is doesn't wrap far enough back around the wheel for uber super protection.
 

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I don't want to over-think or over-complicate things here, but two observations if I may.


First - I think I'm correct in thinking that Wunderlich sells a rear hugger which appears to be identical in all respects to the PUIG item, and which is almost certainly made by PUIG for W'lich. Have there been any reported failures on W'lich-branded huggers?


Second - I have seen pix showing a fractured front support arm (this is the one with the rotation bush inserted) and others with the rear arm fractured (the one which bolts through to the brake caliper).


Why is it so? Is it time to call in Sherlock Holmes or M. Poirot? :surprise:


L of S
 

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I don't want to over-think or over-complicate things here, but two observations if I may.


First - I think I'm correct in thinking that Wunderlich sells a rear hugger which appears to be identical in all respects to the PUIG item, and which is almost certainly made by PUIG for W'lich. Have there been any reported failures on W'lich-branded huggers?


Second - I have seen pix showing a fractured front support arm (this is the one with the rotation bush inserted) and others with the rear arm fractured (the one which bolts through to the brake caliper).


Why is it so? Is it time to call in Sherlock Holmes or M. Poirot? :surprise:


L of S
I think "steve b in sd" has done a great job in identifying the weak areas of the hugger and going about a fix.

However these huggers must have been already installed on a lot of BMW bikes?? RT's/GS's surely it's a weakness that would have shown over hundreds of sales.

I love, and have a tendency to over think things as well Lawrence.

My BMW sport 'soft bag 2' I had replaced as the secure 'wide' strap that fits snuggly over the rear BMW rack on our bikes and my BMW f800s rack…had shredded.
The supplier was puzzled to its demise.
The BMW rack on the f800s I had painted black, although smooth like the silver finish the rack comes as standard, it was abrasive enough to act as a sandpaper…to the straps demise.:frown2:

It makes me curious as to why Perrie's Puig hugger has broken twice!
Is it a different manufacturers source that his Puig hugger is coming from?
As silly as it may seem…..vibrations from his bike thats taking its toll on the hugger, a particular gear that the bike is ridden in, most of the time.
But i'm sure with his trained and work background all this would have been considered.

See..now I'm over thinking…but interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The Wunderlich unit is sourced from Puig, they have a link on their site for instructions which brings up the Puig instructions. I would say that solves that mystery.. lol

Also, it's interesting to note that on Wunderlich's website, they have this: "Important: Torque the mounting bolts while someone is sitting on the bike."

Um, that shouldn't make any difference at all if the part was properly designed...... harumph..... I guess they sort of acknowledge that tightening the bracket with the suspension in the riding position somewhat prevents stressing the bracket by tightening it with the suspension unloaded? Do they note this because they have had problems? There's nothing noted in the Puig instructions suggesting a proper tightening procedure.

Just a thought.
 

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More hugger thoughts during the first ride of 2016...

I put in a decent and brisk-ish 384km today, in pleasant weather after recent torrential rains and accompanying unbearable humidity, my first outing of the year.

I travelled in a big loop to the SW then E then N around the outer Brisbane region, the Scenic Rim, and into the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales – very pretty country around there, and all very lush and green after the recent rain. See pic of map with black dots being my route.

Today’s roads varied from billiard-table smooth to Dakar Rally rough – to call some of them a goat-track would be an insult to all the goats in all the world, and they would be a definite no-go on a dark and stormy night.

The R’s roadholding and composure was, as always, exemplary, despite the fact that along some of these tracks the bike’s rear end was hopping up and down like a professional pogo-stick practitioner preparing for a cross-country marathon, and so the hugger was on my mind.

I’ve become a bit wary after these recent posts about failures of PUIG rear hugger mounts, rare though they are, and wondering what to do, apart from disassembling the whole plot in the next few days, checking everything and maybe making some adjustments as suggested here. Or – leaving well alone!

Despite my conservative riding style the bike’s suspension took quite a hammering today, so I’m happy that when I checked the hugger supports on arriving home all was well.

On the road will be a different matter, and with my upcoming long 3500km or so Tour de Snowies in mind – some of which might also be on poor-condition roads – I’ve been pondering ‘what if?’ Being a firm believer in Murphy’s Law I’m convinced that if a hugger support arm fractures, it will be when I’m as far away from home as planned on this trip – about 1700 or so km! So I intend to take some fixin’s with me, just in case.

My plan is to carry two short lengths of heavy-duty rubber hose of appropriate internal diameter (such as a piece of auto radiator hose) – one for each arm, and each piece 2” to 3” long – and some worm-clips to suit. Should a support arm fracture, with any luck there’d be enough material at each side of the point of fracture to allow a length of the hose – trimmed to suit – to be clamped-up onto each end, thereby securing it as an emergency fix.

Following are some pix from todays’ ride, including one of a rather tasty tank paint-job – OE I imagine – on an 1150 GS seen roadside today, and a pic of the pretty NSW village of Uki – “Where Mountains Touch the Sky”.

I touched a nice coffee there, and become up close and familiar with a very tasty slice of mango, orange, and coconut torte: GPS coordinates are being sent to doc_dogg.

Another pic shows Mt Barney on the Queensland/ New South Wales border, heading south.

Enjoy!

Lawrence of Suburbia (‘39 model)

2013 Montego Blue R1200 R - now at 4267km.

Akrapovic can; BMW konfortsitz; Grip Puppies; Abdeckring; stainless-steel oil-cooler rad-guard; Skene LED rear conspicuity lights; Cree front hi-viz LEDs; Puig New Generation Naked screen; Puig Carbono rear hugger; Stebel Magnum mini-Mack two-tone horn; TPS cover.
 

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So I intend to take some fixin’s with me, just in case.[/FONT]

My plan is to carry two short lengths of heavy-duty rubber hose of appropriate internal diameter (such as a piece of auto radiator hose) – one for each arm, and each piece 2” to 3” long – and some worm-clips to suit. Should a support arm fracture, with any luck there’d be enough material at each side of the point of fracture to allow a length of the hose – trimmed to suit – to be clamped-up onto each end, thereby securing it as an emergency fix.
Looked like a great day to ride Lawrence.

I wonder if you also made up a small bent piece of aluminum strip to act like a splint, then place the radiator hose over this as well.
 

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LoS - I would simply remove the rear mounting bolt, and check that the hugger pivots easily around the front bolt, and that the inside face of the rear mounting lug is snug against the final drive, no gap and yet you should just be able to pull it away to make a small gap.
If all that's ok then either it was right in the first place, or it's bedded itself in, and you can probably leave it all alone (after putting the bolt back of course).
If however there's any untoward stiffness or misalignment then me personally I'd want to fix it pdq.
 

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LoS - I would simply remove the rear mounting bolt, and check that the hugger pivots easily around the front bolt, and that the inside face of the rear mounting lug is snug against the final drive, no gap and yet you should just be able to pull it away to make a small gap.
If all that's ok then either it was right in the first place, or it's bedded itself in, and you can probably leave it all alone (after putting the bolt back of course).
If however there's any untoward stiffness or misalignment then me personally I'd want to fix it pdq.

OK, thanks Sprig. After chocking-up the rear wheel I did as you suggest. There is an easy degree of rotation of the front hugger arm around the front bushed pivot, so that sounds good!


BUT - I was a bit concerned to note a small but appreciable gap of about 3mm between the bottom lug (where the rear bolt screws into the caliper) and the caliper body itself when the rear bolt was fully removed - the arm sort-of sprang out a little bit. I hadn't noted this before, but it was probably there.

This seemed to me to slightly distort the alignment of the two hugger arms when screwed back into place, putting excess and unnatural stress on the arms - surely they should not be under any kind of tension or torsion?


So as a bit of first-aid I inserted a thick-ish (about 1.5mm) ss washer between the inner face of the rear arm's lug and the face of the caliper. This has effectively reduced the gap there and thus the free play. It probably has had the same effect as filing away one or both lug faces as done here by steve b.


D'you think it would be wise to insert a second washer to more-or-less fully close the gap, or should I leave well alone? :001_unsure:


Appreciate your inputs..


L of S
 

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Update to my earlier post...

There seems to be two sets of Threads currently covering this issue. Reflecting, I recalled Pierre's comments and fix from the other Thread <BMW R1200R Appearance - failure and replacement of PUIG rear hugger>.

He found precisely the same gap as I noted below, and also fixed it by putting in two washers to fill the gap.

With this in mind I think I'll remove the rear bolt again and insert another washer there, which should effectively close the gap and remove most if not all stresses on the two arms.

Fingers crossed! :001_unsure:


L of S
 

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Discussion Starter #18
LoS

Yours sounds like it shouldn't be a problem. Just having a bit of "spring" after removing the caliper bolt due to a gap isn't in and of itself much of a problem. You said the paralever mount end of the bracket has rotation when its bolt is torqued to spec, and that's what's important.

Mine, on the other hand, had such a mismatch between the bushing and the thickness of the mount in the front, that when bolted up tight, the bracket would not rotate at all. None. Tight. The rear was irrelevant. So, by filing the bushing mount to be the proper thickness (thinner than the bushing) allows the bolt to be properly torqued to hold the paralever while still allowing the bracket rotation on the bushing. The other problem mine had was the rear mount. Even though it had a slight gap vs the caliper when the front was bolted tight, the face of the bracket wasn't square to the caliper. So, when bolting it up tight, it forced the bracket to conform to the caliper which imparts the type of stress on the small end of the bracket that would eventually cause it to break like Pierre's did. Adding a washer will help, of course, but a couple of millimeter gap can be pulled in by the bolt without causing a problem, I would think, as long as it's not also causing it to change shape at the same time because it's not parallel to the caliper face to which it's mating. In actuality, the movement of the final drive unit vs the paralever arm (and hence, the puig bracket) is quite small, but, over time, enough to snap the cheap metal the bracket is made from. Also, bolting up a bracket solid to the paralever arm wouldn't be a good idea because it has the effect of making the rear suspension bind rather than move freely as designed.
 

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LoS - I would simply remove the rear mounting bolt, and check that the hugger pivots easily around the front bolt, and that the inside face of the rear mounting lug is snug against the final drive, no gap and yet you should just be able to pull it away to make a small gap.
If all that's ok then either it was right in the first place, or it's bedded itself in, and you can probably leave it all alone (after putting the bolt back of course).
If however there's any untoward stiffness or misalignment then me personally I'd want to fix it pdq.
Great thread! Thanks, I just checked this on my hugger, and everything appears pretty good, really useful information.
 

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........With this in mind I think I'll remove the rear bolt again and insert another washer there, which should effectively close the gap and remove most if not all stresses on the two arms.......

L of S
That should stop any side "twisting" load on the front bearing as well.
cheers, sprig
 
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