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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

I just bought an 2016 R1200R with about 40k miles, wanted to know anything I should be concerned at this mileage?

RB
 

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Hi there,

I just bought an 2016 R1200R with about 40k miles, wanted to know anything I should be concerned at this mileage?

RB
See if they will give you a discount on buying a warranty. I would only consider a real BMW warranty, not those aftermarket companies, but some people like those ones too. I would be more confident with a bike with 10k a year on it than those bikes with maybe 500 miles a year. Machines don't like to sit in storage.

Congrats on a great bike. Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
See if they will give you a discount on buying a warranty. I would only consider a real BMW warranty, not those aftermarket companies, but some people like those ones too. I would be more confident with a bike with 10k a year on it than those bikes with maybe 500 miles a year. Machines don't like to sit in storage.

Congrats on a great bike. Enjoy.

It was kinda of private party sale, so no warranty option. Though it's one owner bike, so I'm happy! Speedometer cluster was melted, I fixed it within an hour.

But I wanted to know more about primitive maintenance.

Thank you!

RB
 

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Hi there,

I just bought an 2016 R1200R with about 40k miles, wanted to know anything I should be concerned at this mileage?

RB
Do all the factory scheduled maintenance.

Keep an eye on the fork seals & slider legs.

Start shopping for a new shock. 40K is beyond the limit. They go bad slowly so you just get used to it - until you ride it with the new shock.

Next time you check the valves shim them all to within the lower half of the acceptable lash range. It's a lot quieter.

Ride it hard til it wears out.
 
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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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If it's fine now, it'll be fine in another 40k. Unless you thrash it at high rpm, the valve clearances will change very slowly - noisy is fine, provided they're within spec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If it's fine now, it'll be fine in another 40k. Unless you thrash it at high rpm, the valve clearances will change very slowly - noisy is fine, provided they're within spec.
I'm a bit used to the noise, but the gear is very clunky. Went out for few hours and loved every bit a part from the gear box.

RB
 

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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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the gear is very clunky
It’ll be clunky from neutral into first, especially when warm, but once under way, there shouldn’t be any need to shift into neutral. The clutch is light, allowing first to remain engaged while waiting at lights (which also allows a quick getaway if ‘threatened’ by a vehicle from behind.

Once under way, my up-shifting technique for slick, quiet shifts when not using the Shift Assist goes like this:
  1. take up the slack in the clutch lever (this disengages the Shift Assist)
  2. take up the slack in the gear lever and apply moderate pressure
  3. roll the throttle off quickly as you dab the clutch lever half-way
  4. as load comes off the drive train the gear lever should snick through with a little more pressure to ensure it goes through fully to the next gear - immediately release the clutch lever and reapply the throttle.
These actions (particularly 3 and 4) are quick rather than deliberate.
 

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I quickly discovered I only need to move the clutch lever in a half inch once I've pre-loaded the shifter. It is very quick and quiet. Mine's an '11 with 12k miles.
 

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Dave in NE TN
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I quickly discovered I only need to move the clutch lever in a half inch once I've pre-loaded the shifter. It is very quick and quiet. Mine's an '11 with 12k miles.
This is the technique Reg Pridmore teaches at CLASS. I also find it works exceptionally well.

Cheers, Dave
 

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This is the technique Reg Pridmore teaches at CLASS. I also find it works exceptionally well.

Cheers, Dave
Funny - I spent a lifetime pre-loading the shifter. You wouldn't believe how long it takes to un-learn that behaviour when you get your first bike with the quick-shift technology. Even in the second year of owning my 2016 Roadster with Shift Assistant Pro, I was still occasionally shifting when I didn't intend to. At times, I must've looked like a 15-year old kid learning to drive a manual-transmission truck.
 

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I quickly discovered I only need to move the clutch lever in a half inch once I've pre-loaded the shifter. It is very quick and quiet. Mine's an '11 with 12k miles.
You don’t need to touch the clutch. I use the clutch from 1st to 2nd and often, though not always, from 2nd to 3rd. After that the clutch is not required.

All a quick shifter does is unload the gearbox so that you can snick it up into the next gear. You can do exactly the same thing by quickly rolling off the throttle and pushing the gear lever at the same time – up it goes into the next gear. It is basically snapping the throttle closed then open again whilst at the same time pressing on the gear lever. Rolling off the throttle unloads the box allowing you to select the next gear.

It is also much smoother than any quick shifter that I tried – more satisfying too. It is how I have changed gear all my life. Only with the advent of the quick shifter have I realised that so many folks actually use the clutch going up the box.

Oh, and while not recommended at speed (don’t even think about it to be honest!) you can do the same thing going down the box when just toodling along. Except it is the opposite way round. Close the throttle, then on opening the throttle press down on the gear lever – it will go down a gear without use of the clutch. Again, this time on opening the throttle you are just momentarily unloading the gearbox.

Needless to say my R1250R does not have a quick-shifter.
 

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I'm a bit used to the noise, but the gear is very clunky. Went out for few hours and loved every bit a part from the gear box.

RB
I felt the same way about my gearbox. A fresh change of full synthetic helped but shifting got worse. Then the shifter fell off :)

Check the tightness of the stud the shifter pivots on. If it's loose pull it out, clean and grease the pivot bearing surfaces, then screw it back in with a dab of threadlocker.

My transmission is still a bit agricultural but that's a BMW tradition.
 

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Dave in NE TN
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BTDT and I get it, but my '18 GS shifts like butter for the most part. On upshifts I preload the shifter slightly and just breath on the clutch and up she shifts. On downshifts I frequently use Shift Assist Pro which works very well, or just downshift in the usual manner without any drama. Each machine has its own shifting personality in my experience.

I hear Guzzis are really agricultural but have never had the pleasure.

Cheers, Dave
 
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