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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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Great effort, raesgar.

I can't read Spanish so can't really comment on how comprehensive the notes are, but it would seem to be a useful summary of the service procedures.

From the gist of it, I make the following comments:
  • The clutch fluid fill would seem to be superfluous unless you need to re-build the slave or master cylinder. The fluid doesn't require changing.
  • I note in the valve adjustment section the timing chain tensioners are removed. The RSD.exe specifies this, but then requires a special tool to be inserted in place of the adjuster. Your procedure seems to omit use of the tool. It's not clear to me why BMW would specify this process – perhaps to keep the intermediary shaft fixed to ensure it doesn't move while the two camshafts are removed to access the shims. With the tensioners removed and no tool inserted in lieu, it would seem that the risk of the intermediate shaft moving would be higher than not touching the tensioners at all. The Haynes manual is silent about the timing chains. If/when my valves need adjusting, I think I'll simply paint an alignment dot on the respective gears and leave the adjusters in place.
  • The final drive shaft clean and grease isn't a scheduled item but the video you used as a reference is a little scary, with significant rust evident on mating surfaces. Perhaps it's because the bike in question is a GS that has been subjected to creek crossings. I've ridden my LC through flood waters (that came over the cylinders) for a kilometre or so, and wondered afterwards about water ingress. The service centre that did repairs on my bike a couple years later made no mention of the shaft condition when they changed the drive after it was scuffed in a low-side.
 

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+1 on the excellent effort Raesgar, that is an enormous undertaking and must have taken you a LOT of time and effort. Thankyou. (If only I could understand Spanish!)

It seems clear you are a technical writer of some considerable skill - if not you have definitely missed your calling Sir!

I especially like the diagrams you have used, with the non-relevant items in the images faded out and the important items referred to/touched/removed/installed in that particular process clearly shown, with arrows and other useful identifying marks.

I'd be very interested in knowing what application you used to create those very useful diagrams and how it was done. As a budding writer with an interest in technical subjects involving motorcycles, I would find the ability to create similar diagrams extremely useful.

Any thoughts of getting your excellent document translated to English? Thanks again.
 

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Hello,

I've not studied Spanish since high school but I'm familiar with english mechanical vocabulary and I've often translated from french before. I think I could help you translate the document to english if you are interested.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great effort, raesgar.

I can't read Spanish so can't really comment on how comprehensive the notes are, but it would seem to be a useful summary of the service procedures.

From the gist of it, I make the following comments:
  • The clutch fluid fill would seem to be superfluous unless you need to re-build the slave or master cylinder. The fluid doesn't require changing.
  • I note in the valve adjustment section the timing chain tensioners are removed. The RSD.exe specifies this, but then requires a special tool to be inserted in place of the adjuster. Your procedure seems to omit use of the tool. It's not clear to me why BMW would specify this process – perhaps to keep the intermediary shaft fixed to ensure it doesn't move while the two camshafts are removed to access the shims. With the tensioners removed and no tool inserted in lieu, it would seem that the risk of the intermediate shaft moving would be higher than not touching the tensioners at all. The Haynes manual is silent about the timing chains. If/when my valves need adjusting, I think I'll simply paint an alignment dot on the respective gears and leave the adjusters in place.
  • The final drive shaft clean and grease isn't a scheduled item but the video you used as a reference is a little scary, with significant rust evident on mating surfaces. Perhaps it's because the bike in question is a GS that has been subjected to creek crossings. I've ridden my LC through flood waters (that came over the cylinders) for a kilometre or so, and wondered afterwards about water ingress. The service centre that did repairs on my bike a couple years later made no mention of the shaft condition when they changed the drive after it was scuffed in a low-side.
Hi again, yep, referring to mark the gears is that way. It’s specified in the manual. Just to mark with a pencil where the gears are to let them the same after the procedure.

The cluch fluid change is not mandatory, just an advise to check the color before to do nothing.

Final drive. It’s very common to get rust the final drive. Lot of people has reported that, so this is just, again, an advise.
 

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Hello,

I've not studied Spanish since high school but I'm familiar with english mechanical vocabulary and I've often translated from french before. I think I could help you translate the document to english if you are interested.
Ups why not? I can send you the word version.
 

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+1 on the excellent effort Raesgar, that is an enormous undertaking and must have taken you a LOT of time and effort. Thankyou. (If only I could understand Spanish!)

It seems clear you are a technical writer of some considerable skill - if not you have definitely missed your calling Sir!

I especially like the diagrams you have used, with the non-relevant items in the images faded out and the important items referred to/touched/removed/installed in that particular process clearly shown, with arrows and other useful identifying marks.

I'd be very interested in knowing what application you used to create those very useful diagrams and how it was done. As a budding writer with an interest in technical subjects involving motorcycles, I would find the ability to create similar diagrams extremely useful.

Any thoughts of getting your excellent document translated to English? Thanks again.
Thanks to you!
The pics are just taken from the BMW Official REPROM, so is not my merit at all. The rest of the images are taken from Haynes manual and some other vídeos on YouTube.
 

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So here i go again with another of my first world problems.
Yesterday i decided to test the coolant quality using a tester. So first check from the reservoir tank. The liquid seemed totally clear, not blue of any other colour, just transparent. This made me think i put the day before distilled watter, so it must have clear the coolant. So,i decided then to check directlly from the radiator. Yes, you can imagine the rest...

Plenty of coolant around the floor. Anyway, the liquid from the radiator was totally transparent again. The tester said that was ok just for cooling not antifreeze!!! So strange, made me think the whole system was filled with distilled watter!
The nest step was to refill as the reservoir got empty, with a coolant bottle (not opened) I had somewhere.
The coolant is Ipone. I let you some pics to judge the situation. With the new coolant, now blue, the tester said is ok for antifreeze and cooling. Three balls up, not only one as it was before the “emergency refilling”

so, do I have to change the liquid of the whole system??

here are some pics.
108054

108053

108052
 

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Ups why not? I can send you the word version.
Hi there!

I've finally managed to make my own step-by-step service manual, so i would like to share with you the pdf.

I would be very pleased to know any fault or something to add/remove from it. By the way, the manual is in Spanish, but i think it can be very usefull anyway.

https://www.wishingwell.es/Revisiones-Manual-R1200RS.pdf

Thanks!
good job, well done, I converted to English
 

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If I can make a few comments:
  • After replacing the front wheel for any reason, turn on the ignition to release the front fork ESA valves, then push the bike forward and down against a wall, without using the brakes, to compress the suspension a few times and let the forks settle naturally on the axle before then tightening the axle clamps.
  • When changing the front brake fluid, the same squeeze and release action as is specified for the rear brake should be followed. Also, I prefer to empty the master cylinders before pouring new fluid in so I'm not pumping old fluid through the lines.
  • A surer way to bleed the cooling system, should you decide to change the fluid, is to use the vacuum fill method. This results in far less initial air in the system and you can be assured of even cooling of the cylinder heads at initial start-up.
  • When checking the valves, a better seal is achieved on reassembly by having clean, dry gaskets, rather than oiled. The fitment is unlike an oil filter gasket where screwing the filter up tight demands lubrication to avoid distorting the gasket and to allow the filter to tighten properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If I can make a few comments:
  • After replacing the front wheel for any reason, turn on the ignition to release the front fork ESA valves, then push the bike forward and down against a wall, without using the brakes, to compress the suspension a few times and let the forks settle naturally on the axle before then tightening the axle clamps.
  • When changing the front brake fluid, the same squeeze and release action as is specified for the rear brake should be followed. Also, I prefer to empty the master cylinders before pouring new fluid in so I'm not pumping old fluid through the lines.
  • A surer way to bleed the cooling system, should you decide to change the fluid, is to use the vacuum fill method. This results in far less initial air in the system and you can be assured of even cooling of the cylinder heads at initial start-up.
  • When checking the valves, a better seal is achieved on reassembly by having clean, dry gaskets, rather than oiled. The fitment is unlike an oil filter gasket where screwing the filter up tight demands lubrication to avoid distorting the gasket and to allow the filter to tighten properly.
Thanks a million, Panzermann. I have already updated the pdf with your comments, overall the front suspension movements to settle on the axle.
 
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