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I have a 2012 Classic and I have tubeless tyres as standard.
There must be two different models of spoked rims, ones with tubes and the others without? :001_huh:
I live in Finland so maybe Europe gets tubeless and the rest of the world tubed tyres on the Classic. Because I know that the U.K. models and the German models are also tubeless.
 

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I have a 2012 Classic and I have tubeless tyres as standard.
There must be two different models of spoked rims, ones with tubes and the others without? :001_huh:
I live in Finland so maybe Europe gets tubeless and the rest of the world tubed tyres on the Classic. Because I know that the U.K. models and the German models are also tubeless.
Jokerdef, You have tubeless tires, no doubt. All Classics with spoked wheels do. However, you have tubes inside your tubeless tires. All Classics with spoked wheels come that way.
 

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Jokerdef, You have tubeless tires, no doubt. All Classics with spoked wheels do. However, you have tubes inside your tubeless tires. All Classics with spoked wheels come that way.
Ahh, ok. So they plug those spokes with a separate tube to hold the air in.
Does this make changing tyres more difficult?
 

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It doesn't make CHANGING tires more difficult; it does preclude repairs of flats with plugs.
 

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Link doesnt work in Russia.. can anyone copy/paste content right into this tread? thanks in advance...
It's probably to cold and the link is frozen :001_tt2::001_tt2::001_tt2:




This post describes my experiences sealing the spoked rims on an R1200R Classic so that tubeless tires can be used without the innertube that is standard on the stock bike. The conversion I performed is based on the Japanese “Outex kit” (Kit FR355, purchased on ebay, arrives in about a week) with some modifications suggested by posts on the advrider forum by the wheel guru Woody (of Woody’s Wheel Works in Denver). Because the R1200R Classic model does not have the factory option of a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS), I also installed an aftermarket Doran TPMS so that tire pressure could be monitored in the tires after the tubeless conversion.

The first thing to note (see photo below) is that the Classic’s spoke wheel rims are marked MTH2 on the side wall and, as shown in the photo inset, there is a 5 degree reverse slope on the textured area next to the bead seat leading to a bump that together are designed to keep the tire on the rim if the tire goes flat. More info on MTH2 cross section rims can be found on Snowbum’s airhead site (Tubeless versus Tubes in BMW motorcycles). I have seen closeup photos of R1200GS cross spoke wheel rims that also had an MTH2 designation; these GS rims are used with tubeless tires (and no tube). Thus there appears to be no safety issue in converting the R1200R Classic rims to tubeless because the bead mounting area of the rim is the type that is typically used for tubeless tires.

The outex kit is based on a two layer thick system consisting of a thick flexible adhesive strip and a durable plastic cover that together seal the spoke nuts on the inside of the rim. After removing the tire, tube, and rim protector rubber strip covering the nuts, I cleaned the inside of the rim with acetone. Woody suggests putting a layer of gap-forming cyanoacrylate glue (i.e. thick crazy glue) in the spoke hole and around the base of each nut to provide a solid foundation that prevents the strip from pushing down into the cracks under pressure and eventually forming micropores. The process I used is shown in the figure below. I first used a small sanding disk on a Dremel to smooth off the rough edges (upper left inset) on each spoke nut to produce a smooth surface (middle upper inset). After they were all sanded, I then scrubbed around each nut with soapy water (dish soap), using a toothbrush to remove any sanding residue; I then used hot water to thoroughly rinse off the soap residue and let the rim thoroughly dry. After this preparation, the nuts were filled in with rubberized cyanoacrylate glue (Bob Smith Industries IC-2000, 1oz. size). This glue is black in color and surrounds the nut and fills the thread hole. The trick is to apply it in thin layers (<0.5mm thick) and spray on a mist of accelerator (Bob Smith Industries Insta-set Accelerator Spray-2oz.) through a paper mask (upper right inset) for EACH layer. This filling-in must be done for each nut in a series of thin layers (<0.5mm thick) in order for the glue to harden properly. If you put it all on in one step and then spray the accelerator, only the glue on the surface hardens. I found it convenient to hold the rim during this gluing by having the lower half of the rim sit in the opening of a plastic crate on the floor.

I cleaned the rim again with soapy water, rinsed thoroughly with hot water, and then let it dry. The process I used for applying the adhesive strip, covering, and valve (which comes with kit) followed the instructions in the kit. The only additional step I took was to measure the width of the adhesive strip and then put pencil marks next to each spoke nut, as shown (red arrows) in the figure below, that indicated the expected edge of the strip if it were properly centered over the spoke nuts. This was a great help when slowly pressing on the adhesive strip, because otherwise it is too easy to get it off center as you go around the rim. I also cut the strip at an angle (instead of perpendicular to its length) where the junction occurs between two spoke nuts. This is shown in one of the installation videos available on the Outex website, but not clearly indicated on the instruction sheet that came with the kit. The kit comes with circular adhesive pads to put over the spoke nuts before installing the strips. Given that the nuts were filled with the rubberized glue, I don't think it is necessary. However, I decided to put the pads on the nuts in the front rim and no pads on the rear, to test it out both ways. I suspect there will be no differences down the road.

The photo below shows the installed sealing strip. The metal bolt-in valve that comes with the kit is high-quality and it fits in the existing valve hole perfectly without the need to enlarge the hole. This means that if you end up not liking this sealing system, you can just revert back to the tube set-up, as you have not altered the rim.

The tires I chose (Michelin Pilot Road 3) went on the rims fine using two short, and one long, tire spoons (and a NoMar stand for holding the rim while mounting). I static balanced the wheels (after installing the TPMS sensor on the valve ) using a Parnas axle assembly (BG12 kit, marcparnes.com).

I purchased the Doran Model #360M TPMS system to monitor tire pressure on the tubeless rims. Installation was straightforward. As shown in the photo below, I mounted the display on the handlebar next to the clutch control lever. The only wiring required is power for the unit; in my case, the power wire was led under the gas tank to an Eastern Beaver switched fuse panel I had previously installed under the seat. As shown in the inset, the sensors mount on the valves and fit easily in the area between spokes.


I performed the whole installation about 6 weeks ago and set the tire pressures to the factory recommended 36 PSI front, 42 PSI rear. It's been cold in NJ and I have only put about a hundred miles on the bike since the installation, but so far the pressures have not dropped at all (measured at 50 degrees; the pressure changes with temperature) since I first set them 6 weeks ago. With the inner tube setup I had previously, I needed to top up the pressure every few weeks, so this is already an improvement. Of course, only time (and miles) will tell if this is a good system on the R12R Classic. But so far I have been very pleased with how the conversion went.""""""""





Now, you have another option, it's not only easier, it makes your bike look way better, just purchase and install. You might be able to swap yours with someone.
:2cents:




Clem: what are you doing in other forum, traitor
 

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Hoshiko, many thanks! main reason of why i've got classic are spokes.. yes links are frozen... for some unknown reason weather is getting cold now here ...
 

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I'll be doing this soon myself. I didn't order today as they won't ship until after the first of the year so I thought I'd wait until then. Looks interesting with the worst part spooning the tires off and back on without any rim or personal damage. I'll search for some suitable equipment.

Any who have done this experience any problems since?

2bob
 

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Ordered mine on the 26th of December and amazingly it was in the UK by the 28th, only problem with the delivery is the import duty required before they would release it, £32 and in total it came to around £130.
I've completed the rear wheel and it sealed it ok. Took my time to infill the spoke recesses with some gorilla glue and I'm 1/2 way to finishing the front wheel.
Once it's done I'll be getting the Stop'n and go pocket plugger puncture repair kit along with a slime power sport 12v pump.
It's one of those hidden gems, hopefully well worth the money
 

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An easier option might be to find someone who has alloy rims on their bike, but who would prefer the look and style of the wire-spoked wheels on a Classic - and do a swap.

I've thought about this a cuppla times, but being in Oz the chances are slim to none.

L of S
 
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. Looks interesting with the worst part spooning the tires off and back on without any rim or personal damage. I'll search for some suitable equipment.

Any who have done this experience any problems since?

2bob
You need to get some "rim protectors", or have some thick leather square patches to place over/on the rims where you are going to lever with the tyre levers. But you most likely need to set up some sort of bead breaker. If you are really interested in doing this yourself, and want to make a home made bead breaker, that you can do all your own tires let me know and I will take a photo of what is set up for mine. Other wise best to take your tyre into a motorcycle shop and they have melange of tyre poppers, pumpers, and whizz bang technology to get your job done.

rim-protector-2.jpg
 

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An easier option might be to find someone who has alloy rims on their bike, but who would prefer the look and style of the wire-spoked

L of S

The most time consuming part of the process is the glue setting in the spoke recesses as you can only do 3 or 4 at a time, due the curvature of the wheel.
As it's winter here I have plenty of time to get it done.
It's also great having a tyre fitting guy 2 minutes away, he charges £10 to remove, refit and balance each loose wheel.
After taking a few days preparing the wheel it took 10 minutes too fit the kit. It's the easy part.
When it's all done it'll give me the peace of mind when touring around France in a few months.
 

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I would like revive this old thread and see if we can get an update from any Classic riders who have sealed their wheels.......

What method did you use? Outex? Home brewed concoction?


What are your results over time? :whatdoyouthink:
 
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I used Outex and was successful with the rear but not the front. The front rim being narrower than the rear is harder to apply the tape properly.
I have been riding on the rear with Outex for 10,000 miles and air loss is not worse than the front with the tube in it. When I get new rubber I might try to do the front again and take a little more care with it. I'am not sure who but I have seen some other folks who have done it successfully front and rear.
Best of luck.
 
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Very interested in this too.......Got stranded on my last trip 1,000 mls away from home with a flat...luckily a slow leak and I carried a compressor so was able to get to the nearest shop.
 

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BMW should use the GS-type lacing for all their spoked models. Nevertheless, I'd stick with alloys - easier to clean.
 
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