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If you find yourself here, it is most likely your bike has sprung a fuel leak and you have decided to replace all the plastic quick disconnects (WHY BMW!!!) with metal ones. I got the full set from Beemer Boneyard https://www.beemerboneyard.com/cpcqkdiscr12r.html but I'm sure you could get them somewhere else should that be your preference.



First step is to remove the tank from your bike. It has been covered plenty of times before so I'll skip that bit. I like to give all the wires and cables a bit of a visual and jiggle test whilst the tank is off. Makes finding cables that are rubbing or stripped easy to find.





Once the tank is off, you use a 19mm spanner to remove the female threaded quick disconnect. If you are unlucky like me, just touching the QD will snap it clean off :(





If this happens, you may need to remove the pump from the housing and unscrew the remainder of the QD with a large flat head screwdriver. I ripped the guts of the QD valve out with pliers and using a gentle bit of downward pressure I was able to unscrew it. Thankfully whoever did the flange ring recall used a nice soft thread sealant.








After cleaning up the thread on the fuel pump I applied a small amount of the supplied thread sealant onto the metal QD threads. Making sure to skip the first couple of threads and lightly coat about 3 or 4 threads 360° around. The instructions said to leave it 30 mins to go tacky before screwing it in, but I read that bit after I had screwed it in...hopefully it doesn't leak.



If using the the Beemer Boneyard thread sealant, leave it overnight to set fully before filling with petrol and priming the pump. If you don't get thread sealant with your parts, Loctite 567 is what you need. It is both petrol resistant and plastic part safe. Note: Permatex High Performance Thread Sealant is NOT recommended for plastic parts.


Next job is to fit the straight female QD to the other hose on the fuel pump assembly. Getting the plastic one out is a bit of a job. Use a pair of needle nose pliars to get the OEM clamp off by flattening out the loop. I had success using a pair of plastic fuel line clamps to apply pressure just at the end of the barbed QD and used a thin ball ended allen key to loosen up the hose without gouging it. Some copious jiggling, wiggling and squeezing will have the plastic bit out. Make sure to wipe the inside of the hose out, just to remove any residual chunks of rubber hose (you don't want bits in your fuel injectors).



Next put the supplied hose clamps on and push the barbed end of the QD in the hose. I tightened the clamps up until I was unable to rotate the QD in the hose.






If you removed the fuel pump assembly like I did, put it back the way it came (there is a tab on the assembly that goes into a slot in the tank part). It is probably a good idea to replace the rubber gasket in the tank part. I didn't, but I will when I next change the fuel filter (or sooner if it leaks).


Replace the 90° male QD with a metal one using the same aforementioned poking, jiggling and squeezing method. Remember to face the male part towards the fuel pump assembly.






The last bit is to replace the two 90° QDs on the bike itself. I was careful not to pull too hard as they end up in a plastic part as well that looks like a real bugger to replace (the opaque cream coloured bit in the background).





Now with metal ones, the way God intended.






All the remains is to plug it all back together. Wait overnight for the sealant to set. Start the bike and watch for leaks. Pull the tank back off, fix the leaks by tightening the hose clamp or reapplying sealant, tightening to spec and waiting overnight to try it again. YMMV.


All up a pleasant way to spend an afternoon at the inlaw's.
 

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Quick Disconnects

Great write up Scott.
Thanks for taking the time to document. :goodjob:
 

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Thank you so much for taking the time to document all this. Those of us who have not yet done this will certainly find it useful!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Tested it today for leaks. Not even a whiff of fuel :) So I pumped up the tyres, filled it with fresh fuel and went for a 30 min ride to test things under pressure. No issues at all.



All up it was easier than I expected. Highly recommended!
 

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what leak?

Sorry for being out of touch for so long... Summer is NOT riding season in Florida - so the poor bike has sat unused for (too many) months. I was so happy it cranked up with no issues... except... for the smell of raw gas!!

now... I started to post this question as a new thread but launched another search instead and found this write-up... THANKS! I was going to buy a new OEM hose if i could find it but was having no luck...

I have identified a leak in the fuel delivery hose (at least that's what my Haynes Manual calls it) at the point where it attaches via quick-connect fitting to the fuel pump.
 

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Just FYI (or is it FMI), when is a good time (routine maintenance) to just do this proactively since the bike is “torn down” enough to access the relevant parts?

Can you post link(s) to the kits one should order? I did something similar for my XX (no disconnects) so adding them made it easier to dismount the fuel tank to access air filter, plugs, etc. without having to drain the tank each time.

Never mind...saw the link in the first post.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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BMW Brain

Well, i ordered, received, and installed the kit from beemer boneyard and took it out for a little 90 mile round the block today, and, as advertised, the fix worked perfectly.

On the ride home i got to thinking how $130 to a BMW Brain is like $20 to a normal brain. I didn't think twice about this fix. If it had been my old Honda, I'd have spent twenty nine cents on an O-ring and called it a day. A normal biker brain says - but hey... now you have these shiny chrome parts - even if no one will ever see them. and a sport biker brain says - Dang! these are HEAVY. I probably lost 2/10 of a second per lap!

but... it worked. the fix was easy and fast. It was worth it to my BMW Brain.

bw
 

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If you find yourself here, it is most likely your bike has sprung a fuel leak and you have decided to replace all the plastic quick disconnects (WHY BMW!!!) with metal ones. I got the full set from Beemer Boneyard New CPC Chrome Plated Brass Fuel Line Quick Disconnect Set For All R1200R Bikes but I'm sure you could get them somewhere else should that be your preference.



First step is to remove the tank from your bike. It has been covered plenty of times before so I'll skip that bit. I like to give all the wires and cables a bit of a visual and jiggle test whilst the tank is off. Makes finding cables that are rubbing or stripped easy to find.





Once the tank is off, you use a 19mm spanner to remove the female threaded quick disconnect. If you are unlucky like me, just touching the QD will snap it clean off :(





If this happens, you may need to remove the pump from the housing and unscrew the remainder of the QD with a large flat head screwdriver. I ripped the guts of the QD valve out with pliers and using a gentle bit of downward pressure I was able to unscrew it. Thankfully whoever did the flange ring recall used a nice soft thread sealant.








After cleaning up the thread on the fuel pump I applied a small amount of the supplied thread sealant onto the metal QD threads. Making sure to skip the first couple of threads and lightly coat about 3 or 4 threads 360° around. The instructions said to leave it 30 mins to go tacky before screwing it in, but I read that bit after I had screwed it in...hopefully it doesn't leak.



If using the the Beemer Boneyard thread sealant, leave it overnight to set fully before filling with petrol and priming the pump. If you don't get thread sealant with your parts, Loctite 567 is what you need. It is both petrol resistant and plastic part safe. Note: Permatex High Performance Thread Sealant is NOT recommended for plastic parts.


Next job is to fit the straight female QD to the other hose on the fuel pump assembly. Getting the plastic one out is a bit of a job. Use a pair of needle nose pliars to get the OEM clamp off by flattening out the loop. I had success using a pair of plastic fuel line clamps to apply pressure just at the end of the barbed QD and used a thin ball ended allen key to loosen up the hose without gouging it. Some copious jiggling, wiggling and squeezing will have the plastic bit out. Make sure to wipe the inside of the hose out, just to remove any residual chunks of rubber hose (you don't want bits in your fuel injectors).



Next put the supplied hose clamps on and push the barbed end of the QD in the hose. I tightened the clamps up until I was unable to rotate the QD in the hose.






If you removed the fuel pump assembly like I did, put it back the way it came (there is a tab on the assembly that goes into a slot in the tank part). It is probably a good idea to replace the rubber gasket in the tank part. I didn't, but I will when I next change the fuel filter (or sooner if it leaks).


Replace the 90° male QD with a metal one using the same aforementioned poking, jiggling and squeezing method. Remember to face the male part towards the fuel pump assembly.






The last bit is to replace the two 90° QDs on the bike itself. I was careful not to pull too hard as they end up in a plastic part as well that looks like a real bugger to replace (the opaque cream coloured bit in the background).





Now with metal ones, the way God intended.






All the remains is to plug it all back together. Wait overnight for the sealant to set. Start the bike and watch for leaks. Pull the tank back off, fix the leaks by tightening the hose clamp or reapplying sealant, tightening to spec and waiting overnight to try it again. YMMV.


All up a pleasant way to spend an afternoon at the inlaw's.
I realize this is quite an old thread, but I still feel it's the best write-up I've seen on it. Hope someone still sees this. Question: did you replace the actual hoses? It seems nobody ever does, on this particular repair. I'm about to order parts and attempt the same. Thanks again for the pictures and detailed posting!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
did you replace the actual hoses?
No, the hoses should last a long time and as long as you are careful not to pinch or cut them, they are fine to keep using after changing for the metal QDs. Also, they are form fitting and no doubt stupendously expensive if you were to buy them. However, if you do find they are a bit stiff or showing signs of wear, then by all means replace them.
 

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No, the hoses should last a long time and as long as you are careful not to pinch or cut them, they are fine to keep using after changing for the metal QDs. Also, they are form fitting and no doubt stupendously expensive if you were to buy them. However, if you do find they are a bit stiff or showing signs of wear, then by all means replace them.

After perusing the forum and marveling at your wonderful post on this repair, I ended up with the fuel leak 😂 At least I knew right where to look, thanks to you and the forum. Beemer Boneyard kit, identical install, rode about 60 miles today, bone dry so far, fingers crossed. Thanks again!!
 
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re: the hoses...if you need to replace them, BE ABSOLUTELY SURE TO REPLACE THEM WITH FUEL INJECTION HOSES, I.E., NOT REGULAR HOSES. Regular hoses will expand first then dissolve.
This was a huge problem on the 1150s. When I replaced them, as with you, they just broke apart with little manipulation. Crap OEM.
 
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