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any one have any exp. with it....good or bad.

Paul
Yup, used one a few times, I chucked it in the trash. Sometimes the plugs stay, sometimes they don't. One time the tire spit out 3 plugs, another repair spit two plugs in less than 10 miles.. And yes, I know how to use the kit and ream the hole and insert the plug.

I went with good old rope style plugs; they have never failed me. I also carry a Dynaplug kit, have not needed to use it yet. It is just a fancy rope style plug system.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Never go anywhere without it. My back tyre seems to be a magnet for sharp objects and the stop n go has repaired the hole successfully every time. Only on one occasion have I had to get the repair redone professionally on my return home as there was a slight leak, all the others have been permanent.

I even managed to fix a double puncture on my F800 a few years ago.



 

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I carry one all the time, has saved me twice. Simple to use, fast, and effecient plug. Ive had nothing but good luck with them, wouldnt hesitate to recomend.
 

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Stop & go tyre plugger.

Yes. Me too. I alwats carry it. The bag it comes in is big enough to hold allen-key set, torque-keys, and a load of zip-ties as well. Get one. you won't regret it.
 

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Question:
I have heard, and read, that if you get a flat on your bike you should replace the tire. Is this common practice? If so, why? Seems like an expensive repair, especially if you have new-ish tires.
 

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Stop & Go Tire Plugger

Haven't used this Stop & Go kit.

New tubeless tires will often seal themself from a small nail. Rode around town with a roofing tack for a week and it didn't leak down.
If there is any air in the tire, I never pull the nail out on the roadside. Ride slowly until I get to where I can safely fix it.
Have had great results with sticky ropes for all small to medium size punctures. Use a small tube of gum cement and let the repair sit for a while at the six o'clock position.
I carry two types of plugs in case of a larger hole. Don't forget to carry a pair of needle nose pliers! Very handy.

This kit came with another BMW, but the plugs are BIG.
The suggestions to replace the tire are a "Safety First" approach. If you top-end the bike, ride 2-up with heavy luggage, or do long highway miles in summer, heat buildup can be an issue. I rope plugged a BT207 with 200 kilometers on it; it was fine until the cords began to show. I often rode solo at the speed limit though. Your safety is your responsibility.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #27
The tyre normally only needs replacing if the puncture is in the side wall. Also I'm sure there's a safety issue if you have more than 2 repairs. BUT as Clem says above your safety is your own responsibility and if you think the tyre needs replacing then do it.
 

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so what does one do with the tubeless but tubed tires on the Classic? Are they pluggable or should Classic owners just tattoo the BMW towing service on their forearms? I'm aware of that gizmo, I think Hoshiko found where you can wrap the inside of the spoked rims with sealing tape, but I've done enough occupational therapy for the summer. So should Classic owners use the Stop n Go kit?
 

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Discussion Starter #29
drDave - I don't think so. The plug is in the tyre so won't repair the damage to the inner tube. Repairs are done with the tyre on the bike. As far as I know the wheel and tyre would have to be removed to get to the inner tube.
 

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F-word. :( I want a set of BST rims and tubeless tires. . . .
 

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I have had one flat so far with my classic. I would stop and pump it up every 5 miles until I got it to a dealer because the leak was not big. I was lucky to be only 20 miles away from the dealer.

The cast wheels that where on the 2010 and 2009 R1200R look nice, and having the ability to fix a flat sounds good. I have contemplated making the switch if they fit.

In the mean time I carry Slime and a pump. The next time I get a flat I will try the Slime. Several people say it works. I have seen it work on a bicycle. They make it in several size containers.

Has anyone else have experience with fixing tires with tubes without taking the tire off?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Keep an eye on fleabay. Wheels do come up quite regularly. I picked up a spare back wheel for a very good price and had it powder coated. I believe it was from an R1200RT originally. I'm always on the lookout for a front but as I'd like one with brake discs they are way more expensive.
 

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The Stop n Go is just magic. Just so easy to use. I purchased the pistol grip style with the rubber mushroom type plugs. I travel with a manual pump, not interested in the cylinders ( approx. 6psi / cylinder only, I am told ).
My brothers car tyre was my first ( and only, touch wood ) experience. All is still going well.
Regards
John
 

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Stop N Go.....Yeah right

I have no doubt that it works for some punctures, but didn't work for me. Had a great 380km ride yesterday, however 5 minutes from home picked up a TEK screw in my rear tyre, tyre pressure monitor advised I was losing pressure and got home with 14psi remaining. How lucky was that.... I tried to use the Stop N Go, removed the screw, reamed the hole, plugged with the mushroom plug and she won't hold air. I have a couple of weeks to get it sorted, before I take my bike to the shop for 10,000 service. Has anyone a little advice on repairing the hole, brand of rope repair kit, etc...

Thank you

Shishka
 

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I have no doubt that it works for some punctures, but didn't work for me. Had a great 380km ride yesterday, however 5 minutes from home picked up a TEK screw in my rear tyre, tyre pressure monitor advised I was losing pressure and got home with 14psi remaining. How lucky was that.... I tried to use the Stop N Go, removed the screw, reamed the hole, plugged with the mushroom plug and she won't hold air. I have a couple of weeks to get it sorted, before I take my bike to the shop for 10,000 service. Has anyone a little advice on repairing the hole, brand of rope repair kit, etc...

Thank you

Shishka
Might be time to get a patch if a plug won't work - or a new tire.
 

Dave in NE TN
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Merged two old threads to add a personal endorsement for the Stop & Go Tire Plugger Kit.

Motorcycle Tire & Puncture Repair Kits - Stop & Go International

Rear tire was flat due to small screw in center of tread. I used their Tubeless Puncture Pilot Kit with a mushroom plug to repair the puncture, it was very easy and it held up perfectly while I rode 80 miles / 130 km to the dealer for a new tire.

The only items I needed outside the kit were a pliers to pull the offending screw (multi-tool would work), and an adapter to hook the compressor to my bikes power outlet (which is wired direct to battery, bypassing CAN Bus limitations).

I also recommend carrying around one of their string/rope plug kits so you can use several of the "snot ropes" in case the hole is too big or jagged for a mushroom plug.

The tire had 3500 miles on it, the repair might conceivably have held up for the rest of its life, but I'm cautious and I felt a lot better riding home on a new unplugged tire. Everyone is responsible for making their own decision regarding riding on a plugged tire any longer than necessary.

HTH!

Cheers, Dave
 
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Mark 鈥 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Today, I too got a chance to try out my Stop n Go kit. I headed out for some errands and a couple hundred metres from home glanced down whereupon a very bright flashing red triangle caught my attention, along with the tyre inflation icon and a flashing tyre pressure readout, being 1.4 bar for the rear tyre rather than 2.9. Inspection revealed a nail in the tyre. Being close to home, I returned to effect a temporary repair in the comfort of my garage.

Not having used the kit before, I was reliant on the instruction sheet, which is pretty good. The only trick was to know whether I had bottomed out the plunger. Not being confident that I had, I unscrewed the barrel from the conical guide, and sure enough, the plug was still in the barrel. A second effort, backing the plunger off a couple times along the way, was effective. For the future, I鈥檒l run some tape around the Allen key so I know I鈥檝e achieved the required depth.

The tyre is nearing the end of its life and I have no trips planned, so the plug will stay in place until the tyre is replaced in the New Year.

I was fortunate the RDC did its job, as the rear sensor has been somewhat sporadic in its operation for quite a while. Only a couple days ago I played around with it and my GS911, hoping to re-assign the sensors F-R to potentially confirm whether the lack of rear tyre readout is a sensor rather than RDC module issue. Interestingly the GS911 data readout showed that both front and rear sensor batteries are unhealthy, notwithstanding this hasn鈥檛 been reported on the instrument panel as indicated in the manual that it should. The front sensor has also reported a couple comms failure errors, so maybe it is just a battery issue. 5 years and 95,000 km is probably reasonable.

When I replace the tyre I鈥檒l replace the rear sensor with a cheap eBay item I have at the ready, and see how that goes. I will likely replace the battery on the OEM item as well, in case the cheapo doesn鈥檛 last.
 
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I also have tubed tires on my Classic. I plan to use RideOn before the riding season gets underway. I've been using it on several tubeless tires when doing changes, mainly for it's balancing claims. I've got a shop that will replace tires for $25. without balancing if I bring him the wheel. I watched several videos that show how RideOn reseals after going over boards imbedded with nails. If it actually did this, I consider that a bonus. Anyway, I like my spoke wheels and, with other mods/maintenance and other bikes, buying cast wheels for my classic isn't even on my radar.
I'm not advocating RideOn for tubed tires and haven't had it save me as I've only about 1,200 miles on my bike. I just want to offer it as a hedge to others who share my perspective on the issue.
 

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Interesting findings from our favourite YouTube advocate RyanF9

 
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Mark 鈥 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Painful to watch 鈥 more about him than what he was reviewing (as usual ...).

He suggests that the sealing effect against the inner surface of the tyre is unnecessary; that the stem seals the puncture. I'd suggest the inner mushroom is the more important sealing component, and without creating some type of inner mushroom, the repair would be highly likely to fail.

His test of durability seeks to emulate (his example) hitting a rock, and yet the means of testing is in effect re-puncturing the tyre at the site of the repair using a sharp probe, so is completely inconclusive.

The Stop n Go does have various components, but isn't rocket science as he seems to imply. Also, it isn't necessary to keep reaming the tyre so the aperture is circular - just to take off any rough edge.

What he didn't test is the resilience of the Dynaplug. The little 'licorice' strips tend to dry out with age (under your seat or in your jacket pocket) meaning they will detach from the brass arrow-head with very moderate force when seating them back against the inner surface of the tyre after inserting.

The conclusion that snot strings work OK seems fine though - just messy.
 
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