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Hey guys, new to the forum and not sure if this is right place for this thread. I came across a tempting local listing on CL.

2015 R1200R, "launch edition", comes with all electronics - D-ESA, lean angle ABS, ABS-Pro, gearshit pro, BMW nav, BMW top & side cases, Puig touring windscreen, electric suspension, keyless - everything that could possibly be bought apparently and some aftermarket accessories too. 8700mi, awesome condition, yet to see the bike but pictures show she's been well taken care of.

Listed for $11k. Is that fair? Looking at the other For Sale posts in this forum, avg price is about $9800 for similarly equipped 2015ish models.

I watched a few YouTube videos since last evening for general thoughts about the bike and read ride reviews. I'd appreciate tips from folks who've had this for a while, this would be an upgrade for me from a smaller Japanese bike.
  • what are the maintenance costs - big services and oil changes/regular maintenance?
  • any shaft-drive concerns? this will obviously be my first shaft bike
 

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I'd be a bit wary of that 'gearshit' pro...
 

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I'd be a bit wary of that 'gearshit' pro...
Yes - it's important to get the version that has the 'f'. 😄

I'll leave it to US members to comment in an informed manner on the price, but that does seem a lot for a five year old bike, although the luggage, Nav and ABS Pro (added as an upgrade - not available on the original delivery) would bump up the value a fair bit. At 8,700 miles, it's barely run in, although I don't pay too much weight to miniscule mileages as a bike is better used than sitting around, IMO. My 2015 has 85,000 km on the clock and seems to run as well now as when new, with no apparent signs of wear. The model has no endemic issues, although technical changes were made with the MY17 model update available from August 2016 - details are shown here. I suspect the transmission upgrades were to accommodate hard-riding GS owners - the R, RS, RT and GS share the same drive train.

Note that ABS-Pro = 'lean angle ABS', and D-ESA = 'electric suspension'.

The Roadster is fairly naked so service is very straight forward (not much plastic-ware to remove to get at things - the most time consuming in this respect is changing an air filter, and the cylinders stick out in your lap rather than being buried between/under frame tubes). Valves are checked each 20,000 km but unless the bike is ridden hard, shims rarely need to be changed (mine are still in spec). Changing shims requires the cams to be lifted but this is quick and easy because the timing chains are not touched – there's a lay-shaft that the twin cams are geared to. This model seems not to have shaft spline issues that afflicted some earlier models and I've not heard of a Roadster owner wearing out the rear drive. So in theory it will be cheaper than a lot of brands, although I suspect BMW technician hourly rates are at the premium end of the scale, so it is likely to be commensurate with other large bikes (but nowhere the cost of ownership of a Panigale, for example). As a self taught shade-tree mechanic I have done all the maintenance on my Roadster (and the F800 before it) to good effect. I must fit that new front tyre I picked up last week ...
 

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Yes - it's important to get the version that has the 'f'. 😄

I'll leave it to US members to comment in an informed manner on the price, but that does seem a lot for a five year old bike, although the luggage, Nav and ABS Pro (added as an upgrade - not available on the original delivery) would bump up the value a fair bit. At 8,700 miles, it's barely run in, although I don't pay too much weight to miniscule mileages as a bike is better used than sitting around, IMO. My 2015 has 85,000 km on the clock and seems to run as well now as when new, with no apparent signs of wear. The model has no endemic issues, although technical changes were made with the MY17 model update available from August 2016 - details are shown here. I suspect the transmission upgrades were to accommodate hard-riding GS owners - the R, RS, RT and GS share the same drive train.

Note that ABS-Pro = 'lean angle ABS', and D-ESA = 'electric suspension'.

The Roadster is fairly naked so service is very straight forward (not much plastic-ware to remove to get at things - the most time consuming in this respect is changing an air filter, and the cylinders stick out in your lap rather than being buried between/under frame tubes). Valves are checked each 20,000 km but unless the bike is ridden hard, shims rarely need to be changed (mine are still in spec). Changing shims requires the cams to be lifted but this is quick and easy because the timing chains are not touched – there's a lay-shaft that the twin cams are geared to. This model seems not to have shaft spline issues that afflicted some earlier models and I've not heard of a Roadster owner wearing out the rear drive. So in theory it will be cheaper than a lot of brands, although I suspect BMW technician hourly rates are at the premium end of the scale, so it is likely to be commensurate with other large bikes (but nowhere the cost of ownership of a Panigale, for example). As a self taught shade-tree mechanic I have done all the maintenance on my Roadster (and the F800 before it) to good effect. I must fit that new front tyre I picked up last week ...
Awesome, thanks for the info. The owner did mention that he went back to dealer to get the ABS Pro fitted in a few days after purchasing the bike. Good to know of the reliability and maintenance stuff. I called a BMW-reputed shop in the area for a quote on the 12,000mi full service and it wasn't too bad; just the valve check/adjustment was really reasonably priced - comparable to my previous bike.
 

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...
Listed for $11k. Is that fair? Looking at the other For Sale posts in this forum, avg price is about $9800 for similarly equipped 2015ish models.
...
Please note it is unlikely the price of any given make/model/year vehicle to be the same across the whole US states,
Given average cost of living is different among the states;
I.e. you need to check prices in your own state

With that in mind,I will add I live in GA, and my second-hand/pre-owned 2016 has-been/is fully loaded (all from the factory),
And when compared to your accessories/additions list, the only differences are
  • no BMW nav (though it has had the BMW cradle for it)
  • no BMW top & side cases, and instead original/first owner has fitted it with 2 Shad SH36 side cases
  • no ABS Pro, and instead standard ABS
And on Oct-2019 (when I have purchased it from first/original owner), with just under 3k miles on it, it has been listed for $11.5k.
 

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Make sure you give the quickshifter a fair go, @kimidam. The R1200 is a high inertia engine/transmission so the shifter works best at higher revs than when puttering around, and tends to be clunky going up 1-2 and 2-3 due to the bigger ratio changes (down is better with these shifts).

Don’t pre-load the lever or the clutch (which we tend to do for regular shifts) - it cancels out the Shift Assist action.

The throttle must be at least partially open for upshifts, and completely closed for downshifts.

I don’t often use mine but when I do, it’s great - smooth progression with minimal interruption to power delivery/engine braking, hands are free in complex scenarios leaving more ‘brain space’ for other things (e.g. high speed merging) and the ‘bars aren’t disturbed as you go up the gears (e.g. cranked over in a tricky corner).
 
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Oh, and for regular shifts, you’ll find they’re smoother if you preload the lever and just dab the clutch rather than pull it all the way.

Once you become accustomed to the bike, you can emulate the Shift Assist with clutchless changes up and down (albeit slower than with the Shift Assist).
 

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Hey guys, new to the forum and not sure if this is right place for this thread. I came across a tempting local listing on CL.

2015 R1200R, "launch edition", comes with all electronics - D-ESA, lean angle ABS, ABS-Pro, gearshit pro, BMW nav, BMW top & side cases, Puig touring windscreen, electric suspension, keyless - everything that could possibly be bought apparently and some aftermarket accessories too. 8700mi, awesome condition, yet to see the bike but pictures show she's been well taken care of.

Listed for $11k. Is that fair? Looking at the other For Sale posts in this forum, avg price is about $9800 for similarly equipped 2015ish models.

I watched a few YouTube videos since last evening for general thoughts about the bike and read ride reviews. I'd appreciate tips from folks who've had this for a while, this would be an upgrade for me from a smaller Japanese bike.
  • what are the maintenance costs - big services and oil changes/regular maintenance?
  • any shaft-drive concerns? this will obviously be my first shaft bike
I buy a 2014 in January, 14000 miles for $7k, then $900 to bring current on tires and maintenance. I moved from a honda nc700. This bike is spectacular in every way. I've put 5000 miles on it, and loved every mile. They tend to sell for low book.
 

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I buy a 2014 in January, 14000 miles for $7k, then $900 to bring current on tires and maintenance. I moved from a honda nc700. This bike is spectacular in every way. I've put 5000 miles on it, and loved every mile. They tend to sell for low book.
I own a 2015 with all options and its best of the best. I've owned two previous R1200R's and all were excellent. The 2015 has improvements that are hard to resist and as long as previous owner has some documented proof of service, you're bound to enjoy long life. I suggest getting a slightly taller windscreen available from several sources but I found the BMW taller option suits me best. Watch tire pressures to ensure you get best handling and longer life from them and of course regular maintenance maintains it forever. Probably best to find a service place that is used to European bikes. Good luck
 

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Love my 2015, only done similar mileage to the one your buying but does everything I need. Can put luggage on, ride to the isle of man and arrive in comfort. When you take it off for a few runs over the mountain and that quickshifter works great.

I had one issue with the starter switch but it was still under warranty at the time and changed without issue. I now take my bike to an independent bmw specialist who is closer to me than the main dealer and much cheaper.

I don't know how tall you are but I'm 6ft and fitted the tallest sports seat and made a massive difference to the comfort of the bike.
 

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Make sure you give the quickshifter a fair go, @kimidam. The R1200 is a high inertia engine/transmission so the shifter works best at higher revs than when puttering around, and tends to be clunky going up 1-2 and 2-3 due to the bigger ratio changes (down is better with these shifts).

Don’t pre-load the lever or the clutch (which we tend to do for regular shifts) - it cancels out the Shift Assist action.

The throttle must be at least partially open for upshifts, and completely closed for downshifts.
Pz's instructions for the convoluted operation of the quickshift remind me of the guidance given to a novice golfist - who had just mastered his first decent shot of the ball - by meister-scribe PG Wodehouse: "your stance was right, and your grip was right, and you kept your head still, and didn't sway your body, and never took your eye off the ball, and slowed back, and let the arms come well through, and rolled the wrists, and let the club-head lead, and kept your balance, and pivoted on the ball of the let foot, and didn't duck the right knee".
 
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There is another bike on this site for $7500. Not saying that you could get the bike you are looking at for that price but from experience the R1200R does not have good resale value.
That doesn't mean it isn't a great bike because it is. Handling, power comfort it has it in spades. The quickshifter to me is only useful for 4th, 5th and 6th gear. But what great fun it is in those gears. In the twisties the guickshifter is a blast. You can downshift comin into a turn with it and then upshift at the apex. It is a blast and is very smooth in those gears. I really don't use it in 1st and 2nd at all. I will use it in 3rd ocassionally. One of the reasons I bought the boxer is the ease of doing your own maintenance. Oil and rear end changes are very easy. The valve adjustment looks fairly straitforward although I haven't had to do this yet. The dealers will charge an arm and two legs for almost any service. BMW is very proud of their parts If you buy this bike get a headlight shield right away. It is a plexiglass 1/4" thick shield from Austrailia and it works. Didn't like the stock seat but there are many custom seats to choose from. I like it with just the little sport windshield. Of course I live in Louisiana where the summers are very hot. You will love this bike. Best of luck and take care.
 

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Oh, and for regular shifts, you’ll find they’re smoother if you preload the lever and just dab the clutch rather than pull it all the way.
...
Again a reminder of how ignorant one could be, first time I hear/read about this tip/method.
Applied and found it to be much better/pleasant/easier than traditional method -
Kindness and willingness to share one's wisdom and experience, and educate the less experienced/knowledgeable ones, are much appreciated.
 

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I own a 2015 with all options and its best of the best. I've owned two previous R1200R's and all were excellent. The 2015 has improvements that are hard to resist and as long as previous owner has some documented proof of service, you're bound to enjoy long life. I suggest getting a slightly taller windscreen available from several sources but I found the BMW taller option suits me best. Watch tire pressures to ensure you get best handling and longer life from them and of course regular maintenance maintains it forever. Probably best to find a service place that is used to European bikes. Good luck
I am buying a 2013 90th edition with the telelever front. I understand that in 2015 that went away. Can you tell me the basic diff between the 13 and 15 changes? In other words, what will I be "missing"?
 

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I think $11K is maybe a little high. The cases are definitely worth having, the screen will be hit or miss, as the other accessories might be. That can all be handled in the bargaining.
I own a 2015 that now has about 21K miles. Still works like new, absolutely no problems with shaft drive. I've done pretty much all my own maintenance work, which, as Panzermann pointed out, is relatively easy.
 

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Make sure you give the quickshifter a fair go, @kimidam. The R1200 is a high inertia engine/transmission so the shifter works best at higher revs than when puttering around, and tends to be clunky going up 1-2 and 2-3 due to the bigger ratio changes (down is better with these shifts).

Don’t pre-load the lever or the clutch (which we tend to do for regular shifts) - it cancels out the Shift Assist action.

The throttle must be at least partially open for upshifts, and completely closed for downshifts.

I don’t often use mine but when I do, it’s great - smooth progression with minimal interruption to power delivery/engine braking, hands are free in complex scenarios leaving more ‘brain space’ for other things (e.g. high speed merging) and the ‘bars aren’t disturbed as you go up the gears (e.g. cranked over in a tricky corner).
My 2015 1200RS does not need closed throttle for downshifts, just steady (not accelerating) speed. I often use it to drop a gear for quick overtake.
 
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