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Can anyone recommend high mileage tires for a
2018 r1200r? I would like to see 15K. I am not an
aggressive rider.
120/70 ZR17 58w front
180/55 ZR17 73w rear
 

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I am very light on the throttle/brakes
(curios to see how many miles I will get out of of these original/stock Metzeler roadtec z8),
And while they still have plenty of thread (motorcycle has about 4.5k miles on it),
I have been doing some reading (mostly in this forum),
Since I have missed few heart beats here and there due to their traction in cold weather
(very easy on throttle, and yet on several occasions they had slid/slipped a bit during a non-aggressive entrance to a turn (mostly front if I recall)),
Air-pressure 42r/36f;
Perhaps/likely they have not had enough time to warm up, so for now I still use and learn them, since AFAIK they should do very well traction wise, have been tire-of-the-year in the past, etc,

And regardless, what I have as of now as my top first and second choices are:
  1. Michelin Road (Pilot) 5; some reviews reported it to reach 20k km, e.g. FortNine, in his Longest Lasting Motorcycle Tires of 2018 review; revzilla has it at 4.6/5 stars thread life and 4.7/5 stars overall, based on 144 reviews
  2. Metzeler Roadtec 01 Tires; also nice to know both Metzeler roadtec 01 and Z8 got top spots in 2016 Sports Touring Tyre Test | Product Tests | Motorcyclenews.com (thank-you to whoever posted a link to that review in this forum); revzilla has it at 4.2/5 stars thread life and 4.7/5 stars overall, based on 35 reviews
p.s. it seems my knowledge is a bit outdated, given most reviews I have watched/read are from '17-'19,
But in my opinion top-of-'18 or top-of-'19 tires are still a very solid choice,
Not to mention great deals/prices as stores clearance them to have room for latest-and-greatest
 

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That Fortnine fella is really irritating.

I’m trying not to wack the throttle wide open all the time as I’m supposed to be running the thing in. But yeah I like to open the throttle for a bit of oom pah

Brakes? I did wonder how long the front pads would last on a boxer, what with all that weight, but then I’m finding I am light on the brakes thanks to all that engine breaking.

Tyres. I had hoped mine would come with the PR4’s. But it came with the Z8’s. But I have to say I can’t really fault then. They are maybe just a bit on the sensitive side at lower speeds. Definitely quite a sporty tyre for a touring compound.

How cold was it when you lost traction rxc?

That fortnine fella is really annoying. Hmm, the mcn test was run by Metzeler and Metzeler tyres came out on top. I don’t like the tread pattern on the new roadtec 01.

I am told the PR5 breaks from previous PR series tyres in having a sportier profile. PR5 not to be mixed with 3 or 4 presumably.

Z8’s look like great value in the UK.

Quick check on UK prices; (without shopping around)

Z8’s - 175 quid.

Roadtec 01 – 200 quid

PR4’s – 220 quid

PR5’s – 260 quid
 

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MCN used the heavy-duty version of these tyres. Is that necessary? What does the bike come with as standard?
 

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... But yeah I like to open the throttle for a bit of oom pah
Same here, but for the sake of preserving rear tire

Brakes? ...
for the sake of preserving front tire

How cold was it when you lost traction rxc?
this whole winter except for rainy days, ranged around +35 Fahrenheit in the mornings (give or take 5 or 10 degrees to cover the whole period); and given my daily one-way commute is ~15min and that I am gentle on the throttle it is arguably not enough time for tires to warm up
 

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In English that appears to be just above freezing! 1 or 2 degrees C. Grip is always going to be limited to a degree at such temperatures. My bike is tucked up in the garage for the winter. Scottish roads are usually wet, greasy and covered in salt and grit during the winter. Plus, there is little day light. I’m a spring to autumn rider I’m afraid.
 

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Interesting comment in the Michelin Road 5 video review that the sidewalls are very stiff. The centre part of the carcass though is much more flexible than other tyres I’ve used or looked at (Metzeler, Pirelli, Bridgestone, Dunlop) - if nothing else, making them easier to DIY fit.
I’m very happy with Road 5’s - on my second set at around 12,000 km a set. I’m a fairly brisk rider but rarely above 120 km/h (noting that in other than NT, maximum limits here are a paltry 110 km/h on motorways, 100 on other open roads. SPEED KILLS is the road safety mantra).
In my experience, high speed is the biggest contributor to tyre wear.
Front wheel braking doesn’t wear the tyre much given the weight transfer keeps the tyre well planted on the road; trail braking into corners will give the sides of the front tyre a hard time though due to the addition of lateral forces to braking forces.
A bias towards rear wheel braking will wear the rear tyre quickly (whether the actual brake or engine braking, especially if you change down an extra gear when entering a corner) due to weight lifting off the tyre allowing slippage. You can see this by the feathering on the tread of your rear tyre toward the outer edges. A mate couldn’t understand why he got such little life from the rear tyre on his Honda V4 Crossrunner, despite being a slower rider than me and taking extra care to get the bike upright before accelerating hard. He was in the habit of relying on engine braking a lot, changing down a gear or two more than he probably needed. In retrospect, I think it was the cause of the rear coming around on him on a wet Jamison-Eildon Road on one of our trips to Phillip Island, resulting in a low-side.
 

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I ride PR4', and at about 6k miles, they're doing quite well. I trust them in most conditions, and ride a good bit of highway.

Grip vs life is always the tradeoff.
 

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...
Front wheel braking doesn’t wear the tyre much given the weight transfer keeps the tyre well planted on the road
...
In my experience, high speed is the biggest contributor to tyre wear.
...
But then - by the same token - hard accelerations which do not involve any slippage (re ABS) would not wear the tyre much either ?
My understanding was that the bigger the speed-change (i.e. acceleration/deceleration) is - the higher the wear on the tyre compound is (and the smaller the speed change is, the lower the wear is), as the tyre compound is being stretched (literally) the most
And following that - that high speed by itself, e.g. if achieved by a gentle acceleration - would be far less wearing out.

I.e. I am aware the tyre compound 'rearranges' itself in the contact area (from a round shape to a flat shape and then back to a round shape),
And therefore the higher the speed is the more times it has to do that at any given period of time,
But have not been aware the wear from that would be that high.
 

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I’m saying that for road (rather than track) riding, accelerating/braking is generally a relatively small proportion of the ride and most of the time the tyre is using the centre sector of the tread. Hard acceleration will induce a level of slip as the thread squirms in response to the forces – not enough to necessarily spin the tyre and cause the ASC/DTC to step in, but enough to cause wear that would otherwise not occur to the extent with gentle acceleration. Similarly with braking. Hard braking on the rear tyre will allow more slippage (especially as the weight lifts off) again, not necessarily enough to trigger the ABS, so abrasion is greater.

The rear tyre is transmitting power throughout the ride except braking. The power required to maintain speed increases approximately exponentially with speed due to air resistance. Hence a 10% increase in speed, for example, will require about 20% more power. A 20% increase in speed requires roughly 40% more power. There are also friction losses within the bike, of course, so its not an exact equation, but these are a lesser proportion at higher speeds where air resistance dominates. Of course the stresses on the front tyre aren't affected in this way.

Designers of sports touring tyres (which we're talking about here) consider this in the tread and carcass design for better grip (and therefore consequently a faster wear rate) on the edges, and for longevity in the centre, thus providing a relatively long wearing tyre (as compared to a sports tyre) with good handling and grip characteristics. Michelin, for example, uses a two-compound approach. Each of these is a fine balance, and depending on your riding habits, roads and road surface, you may wear a tyre out evenly across the tread, wear the centre out first, or the edges first.

When a very elderly man was once asked how he lived to such a ripe old age, he said he doesn't drink, doesn't smoke, and doesn't chase loose women, to which the retort was, 'You call than living?' It's the same for most of us with motorcycles – we enjoy a squirt of the throttle, making the most of corners and the occasional burst of speed. Some push these joys harder than others. So you could go through your riding life with a focus on husbanding every ounce of rubber and fuel, but do you call that riding? Budget constraints may call for such measures, but maybe its better to own a cheaper bike upon which you can then afford to spend more on running costs and ride with an air of liberty in that respect.

For me, I try to enjoy every corner, and am happy to squirt out of them fairly hard while cranked over, the result being pretty even wear across the tread of both tyres. My front tyres tend to wear a bit more on the edges as I normally trail brake into corners, so the edges get a harder time than doing all braking in a straight line. For licence preservation, avoiding expensive fines, and ensuring a tyre will last a trip, I tend to not ride too much over our speed limits (except the occasional blat). This riding pattern, on our abrasive coarse-chip roads, results in about 10-12,000 km life out of a set of sports touring tyres, Road 5's being my current favourite. I'm happy with that, and couldn't be bothered with changing tyres more frequently if I went to a grippier but higher wear sports tyre.
 

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Can anyone recommend high mileage tires for a
2018 r1200r? I would like to see 15K. I am not an
aggressive rider.
I got close (14,5k miles I think) from a Metzeler Roadtec 01 rear tire on my 2007 R. At the time I think it was my record for rear tire life.

Since then I put 18k miles on a rear Shinko 705 on a different bike. Deep tread helps it last. It had enough tread do go farther, but performance had declined, and it was done. You'd have to go down a size (170/60-17) to use it on the R. I liked it well enough to replace it with the same.

Avon has the Storm 3D XM with an extra thick tread on the rear for high mileage.

My record for front tire life was a Dunlop Roadsmart 2 on my FZ1. Over 21k miles. I didn't get nearly as much from an RS3 on the R. The RS2 is pretty cheap right now.
 
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