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I thought I would share my tool kit for long-distance touring. Happy to share and listen to input positive/negative feedback.

I find I can do most repairs/tightening loose fasteners. That being said, apart from flat Tyers/ battery’s and things coming loose, there’s not much that goes wrong with modem bikes these days. With this kit a can remove exhaust - front and rear wheels, but realistic doubtful I ever will. Probably more of an issue for adventure touring but for road-based touring I’m not so sure.




Apart from the above, I take along an air pump, Tire-Plugger kit and small jump starter.

I keep in my jacket a mini torch, headlight and flashing strobe light.



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Discussion Starter #2
The tool kit I carry looks to be extensive but it all packs neat a small. However, I could probably cull a few more items. Realistically for a road-based bike, the need to remove the wheels would be highly unlikely. So I could remove the breaker bar, front axle nut socket and large Torx socket. Although I recall @Panzermann posting once about bending a rim on the Bylong Valley Way on his F800. I did help out a guy on thunderbolts once remove the rear wheel on his GS.

The one bit of kit that did annoys me is the CyclePump - it a little bulky and the alloy case has lots of shape edges. Tho’ the bloody thing just work effortlessly and so solid. I have used to help others and repair my own flat tyres. I removed the stupid little four fold-out legs and buffed all the shape edges down with wire & buffing wheel. I found with the air hose warped around the unit, those shape case edges were slowly cutting the hose.



At one stage I was going to replace the CyclePump and purchased a Stop n’Go small pump. The unit is tiny, and I guess in a pinch, probably be Ok, but it works so hard and gets really hot. Below is a comparison - on the left StopNGo and the right is the CyclePump internals out of my first unit that got run over (long story). It still works but the alloy case was screwed. Might make up a stripped-down unit or keep as spares.




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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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I try to keep my kit as compact as possible so haven't been in the habit of carrying an electric pump, relying on CO2 bottles under the seat to give me enough pressure to get to civilisation, or on mikeS-type travelling companions who carry enough kit to carry out a rebuild/restoration by the side of the road.

However, in recent times I've been travelling solo quite a bit and CO2 bottles are a one-shot affair. Mike's post reminded me I have a quality compact bicycle pump in the garage. It's only about a handspan long and while it would take a lot of pumps to inflate a motorcycle tyre, it's designed to readily achieve the high pressures bicycle tyres run at, so it'll eventually get me out of a scrape.

In fact I have a vague recollection that BMW's of the first half of the last century had a bracket on their frame for a hand pump, but haven't been able to verify this. My pump head clips directly to the Schrader valve stem, which makes the normally convenient 90 degree fitment on BMW's less than ideal, but there's still plenty of room for use on the rear wheel, and just enough at the front. I've never seen or heard of a front tyre puncture anyway - normally it's the front tyre that flicks the road debris to an optimum angle to penetrate the rear. The other end of the pump locks in place for transit.
 

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What took you so long @Panzernann I've been waiting for a response? Co2 cartridges are indeed a shot deal and pray it's fixed the first time. In my view, a small compressor is a reassuring bit of kit to carry partially remote and rural areas. A bicycle pump.. I suppose could be a back-up, but a compressor is the best option.

Come on Panzer, let's see your tool kit - free yourself time to show-and-tell. I need pictures and lay all out, don't be shy. Oh, I think I've said this before...



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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Triple A card and telephone.
Yeah, that can work (and I have a membership too), but in Oz you do not necessarily have phone reception. Also, in my experience, even the BMW Assist is contracted out to a generic provider who is likely to know nothing about your bike and default to towing it on a tilt tray to somewhere not necessarily on your route.
 
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Yes, credit card, mobile & roadside assist might work well in suburbia but out touring a few hundred click (or more)I wouldn’t trust that strategy. Here in OZ regional mobile reception is not great. BMW roadside assist will help if you have a break down but not if you have a tip-over. The thought of being stranded on the side of the road/h’way/freeway or remote country road and hoping someone is going come to the rescue is not something I prepared to risk. Just me I guess.


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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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OK, Mike, I’ll bite.

What you see here are pretty much all the tools I need for general maintenance, other than oil drain pan, filter wrench, torque wrench and feeler gauge. Of course I need my phone to operate the GS911 and there’s a separate puncture repair kit under the seat that stays there all the time - it also contains a $20 note for fuel if I forget my credit card, and a spare topcase key.

Everything to the right of the Pocket Rocket pump fits into the grey gadget case that has little pockets and a bigger zip pocket for the little bits.

The Allen keys and thin 10mm spanner are for non-BMW items I have fitted to the bike at various times. The small shifter is for the mirror stalks and likewise for some non-BMW items.

With this kit I reckon I can undo/tighten pretty much anything one could expect to need to do by the roadside. I use the same items for routine maintenance rather than duplicate; this provides assurance that I have the coverage I need. No coffee machine or home brew keg though.
 

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How good do you feel now that you have opened the Kimono and shared you tool kit list. Very minimalist but it works for you to great success. Looks like if needs be you could remove wheels. I’m curios about the GS-911 diagnostic tool - what kind roadside failures can it pinpoint? Also, do you carry a spark plugs socket? I assume you would have some fuses & some tape. A little torch wouldn’t go astray - please don’t say your mobile flash light.




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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Yes, Mike, I’m feeling a lot better now that my tool kit has come out.

Wheel removal is why I need the long bar adjacent to the pump. I forgot the spark plug socket when referring to other workshop tools. I can’t imagine any situation where one would need to remove a plug by the side of the road. Doing so is only required for replacement, valve adjustment, or engine repair.

I don’t carry spare fuses or tape. Fuses don’t fail of their own accord these days and if one were to blow out on the road, I think I have much deeper issues to resolve than can be sorted by the roadside. If need be, they, and tape, can normally be readily sourced (even from a passing car). Torch? Who rides at night when out in the boonies?

The GS911 can be used to analyse any fault codes by the roadside, including looking at real time values to understand what’s happening with a sensor related to the fault. A PC is required only for maintenance activity such as resetting the service reminders, doing output function tests, calibrations, ABS bleed Tests, clearing and relearning adaptations.

After my horizontal excursion en route to MotoGP in 2017, one thing I think I’ll add is some aluminium repair putty. MaMo covers will eventually wear through if you are going fast enough prior to an ‘incident’. I picked up this pack recently at the Aldi handyman products sale. Like other general purpose consumables, degreaser (e.g. turps) can be sourced locally.
 

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Some compelling thoughts there Panzer. I think your probably right about spark Plug Socket. I’ll probably keep my spare fuses because I’ve had one or two blow. Cheap and take up no room. The other stuff tape (race tape) very handy and worth taking along. Small torch alway good and agreed not many would ride at night out in the boonies, but $hit happens, and I would hate to be out in the dark with a torch of some sort. As happen to me on my Oxley H’Way & Waterfall Way loop. Got caught out ended up riding about two hours in the dark in the somewhere between Armidale & Tamworth.

I could probably flick a couple of the spanners and apart from that, I think I'm all good. Just a suggestion, just saying, you might want to add a some pliers or even a multitool - needle nose or get a multitool crunch (remove nails /screws from tyre) and you'll have a blade and some bonus tools.

I with you in GS-911 great bit of kit.






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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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Good thinking re the pliers/multi-tool, Mike. I’ve done that for the car and probably planned to have my multi-tool with me for trips on the bike, but it had slipped my mind.

Re spanners, don’t forget the underseat toolkit has an 8, 10 and 14 mm open end spanners - I haven’t yet worked out what they’re for.

For those rare night time occasions like you found yourself in, I think I’ll rely on my phone’s torch. :surprise:
 

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If you are thinking about a multitool give the Leatherman Crunch some thought. Nothing wrong with the standard needle nose type, but I partially like the Crunch. I found it useful as its locking type plier /mini multi grips and can be adjusted to clamp down really tight. Also, remove the adjustment thumb screw and used like a screw driver handle for the Phillip & torch bits. Of course it has a couple of blade and flat & Phillips head plus a file.








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Mark – 2015 R1200R-LC Exclusive
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If you are thinking about a multitool give the Leatherman Crunch some thought. Nothing wrong with the standard needle nose type, but I partially like the Crunch. I found it useful as its locking type plier /mini multi grips and can be adjusted to clamp down really tight. Also, remove the adjustment thumb screw and used like a screw driver handle for the Phillip & torch bits. Of course it has a couple of blade and flat & Phillips head plus a file.
Is there a tool you don’t own, Mike (now that you have a Kincrome mini ratchet)? :grin2:
 

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Is there a tool you don’t own, Mike (now that you have a Kincrome mini ratchet)? :grin2:

Well Panzer - I don’t own a GS-911 and now that’s really bothering me.



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Well Panzer - I don’t own a GS-911 and now that’s really bothering me.
:grin2:

These days I’d consider an Android phone and the MotoScan App teamed with an appropriate Bluetooth ELM OBD interface and adapter cable. There’s a thread on here about it. But if you have an iPhone the GS is an easy if more expensive solution.

Of course, the GS911 supports the R1250 so you are future-proofed there. :wink2:
 
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What? No wire crimping tool? ;)

No pics at the moment, but I carry most anything I might need for a field repair when on a trip. When I got the RS, I put every tool I need to access items on the RS in a smallish canvas bag. That and the code reader and a 12v air pump, and that’s it for most rides. On trips, I get my old tool bag and add in anything else I think I’ll need.

My running gag was that when something went wrong, it always required a tool I didn’t have on me. I caught three tire punctures on one trip alone.
 
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What? No wire crimping tool? ;)



No pics at the moment, but I carry most anything I might need for a field repair when on a trip. When I got the RS, I put every tool I need to access items on the RS in a smallish canvas bag. That and the code reader and a 12v air pump, and that’s it for most rides. On trips, I get my old tool bag and add in anything else I think I’ll need.



My running gag was that when something went wrong, it always required a tool I didn’t have on me. I caught three tire punctures on one trip alone.


3x punctures good thing you a compressor on board. How about posting a couple of pix of your tool kit?


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Good thread!

I’ve common items from what has already been displayed and all good suggestions, but add a bent up wire coat hanger. It’s come in handy a few times repairing someone in the touring parties mishap where something stronger and more adaptable than cable ties have been required.
 

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Which got me recalling a trip my parents, sister and I did in 1975 (I was 11) towing a 15ft Caravan behind a V8 Holden Kingswood to Perth and back from Sydney, when the Nullabor was still dirt for around 500 klms. My father, a qualified electrical fitter and auto electrician (and later TAFE teacher) had all bases covered, including a replacement starter motor and alternator, all drive belts, radiator hoses etc. The only thing that failed, was one of the exhaust pipes (twin system) just prior to the first muffler at a joining weld. This was on the dirt section and what was in common supply were empty beer cans and fencing wire. With the ends cut out of the beer can and a lengthways cut, the can was wrapped around the broken section and the fencing wire secure each end to the pipe. I remember Dad saying he didn't get it fixed for months after we returned.
 
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